Definition of cornucopia in English:

cornucopia

noun

  • 1A symbol of plenty consisting of a goat's horn overflowing with flowers, fruit, and corn.

    • ‘However, the cornucopia finial of the original has been replaced by a pink-tongued dragon.’
    • ‘Bring the cornucopia or other symbol of thanksgiving that you used last week.’
    • ‘Bring a cornucopia or other symbol of thanksgiving and photos of some of your friends, the children you meet, and members of the church family.’
    • ‘This subtle critique is best expressed by Horn of Plenty, an internally illuminated cornucopia that virtually drips with paper chains, charms, crystals and a strand of graduated pearls.’
    • ‘These were decorated using stencils and bronze powders (which were less expensive than paints) with motifs such as cornucopias, baskets of flowers, trailing vines, and a wide variety of decorative patterns.’
    1. 1.1An ornamental container shaped like a goat's horn.
      • ‘We found old baskets, a hand-painted antique serving tray, a child's chicken pull toy, a cornucopia, weathered vases and awesome iron candlesticks.’
      • ‘The pervasiveness of this illustration confirms the significant role of the Christmas tree, decorated with tiny toys, edibles, candies, or handmade ornaments - the favorite one being paper cornucopias.’
      • ‘The figure of Ceres on the stem of the cup holds a cornucopia.’
      • ‘The rare cornucopia shown in Plate XVI is embellished with free-floating murrhine and entwined with a seventeenth-century-style crested serpent.’
      • ‘Although the author does not mention it, you can see, from the useful illustrations contained here, that the cornucopia in Britannia's hand has been transformed into a sword in the hand of Leviathan.’
    2. 1.2An abundant supply of good things of a specified kind.
      ‘the festival offers a cornucopia of pleasures’
      • ‘I cannot accept that trained professionals with a cornucopia of offensive weapons at their disposal can't remain calm and professional in crowd control situations.’
      • ‘One by one they argue the reasons they're not guilty of a cornucopia of offences ranging from illegal parking and moving violations, to tossing their garbage on the wrong day.’
      • ‘But if, like me, you're too busy to buy raw ingredients, you might want to instead head to a shop where a cornucopia of ready-made Italian meals awaits.’
      • ‘But the food giant certainly seems friendly, offering consumers a cornucopia of food choices at low prices.’
      • ‘Neither ‘new’ nor entirely ‘forest’, the New Forest is a cornucopia of habitats, a haven of beauty surrounded by intensively managed farmland and conurbations.’
      • ‘The result is a cornucopia of detailed information.’
      • ‘A quick flick through Time Out will show you a cornucopia of options.’
      • ‘If celebrities were food, most would have been a five-course gourmet dinner, slaved over lovingly to the point of succulence, a cornucopia of flavours, some rich, some exotic, some spiced, some delicately subtle.’
      • ‘We are being promised a cornucopia of programming.’
      • ‘The fifth annual five-day event boasts art, food and shelter for the homeless, a cornucopia of artsy performances and a chance to mingle with artists.’
      • ‘It has created millions of jobs from Malaysia to Mexico and a cornucopia of affordable goods for Western consumers.’
      • ‘Still, for those of us lucky enough to be invited, the Forum will, as usual, provide a cornucopia of intellectual stimulation, even if those of us who pack our skis for the annual trip are feeling somewhat cheated.’
      • ‘The markets are a cornucopia of tribal handicrafts.’
      • ‘Frosted store windows groaned with a cornucopia of Irish linens, Madras shawls, China tea, Moroccan slippers, Scottish whisky and Madeira wine.’
      • ‘The Visual Arts Gallery is hosting the exhibition titled ‘Dreams’ a cornucopia of digital media printed on canvas.’
      • ‘With Edinburgh playing host to a cornucopia of festivals over the coming month, it can be difficult to step back and take each individual programme on its own merit.’
      • ‘Situated on the ground floor of the Natural History complex inside the Museum premises, the Museum Library is a cornucopia of books on subjects ranging from Taxidermy to maintenance of gardens.’
      • ‘Far from being pretty and otherwise pointless, our leafy friends provide a cornucopia of benefits; and these benefits provide an ironclad logic for protecting them.’
      • ‘Asian powers such as China and Japan have economies dependent on exports and are eager to supply us with a cornucopia of goods.’
      • ‘The cars that hurriedly zipped on by whilst I sat in behind the taxi driver who was encased in bullet proof plastic were a cornucopia of BMWs, Mercedes, Range Rovers and the odd Holden to boot.’

Origin

Early 16th century: from late Latin, from Latin cornu copiae horn of plenty (a mythical horn able to provide whatever is desired).

Pronunciation:

cornucopia

/ˌkɔːnjʊˈkəʊpɪə/