Main definitions of corn in English

: corn1corn2

corn1

noun

  • 1British The chief cereal crop of a district, especially (in England) wheat or (in Scotland) oats.

    ‘fields of corn’
    • ‘Peas, beans or carrots also formed part of the diet, plus corn, i.e. oats or maize.’
    • ‘To a European, corn covers all the cereal crops - wheat, barley, oat, and so on.’
    grain, cereal, cereal crop
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1The grain of a cereal crop.
      • ‘Indigenous Mexicans believe that God created humanity from an ear of corn and call themselves ‘people of maize’.’
      • ‘The moisture inside the corn kernels was expanding, violently bursting out of the hard shells.’
      • ‘Lin served Lannie; dinner consisted of roast beef, cream corn, beans, mashed potatoes and a tall glass of tropical Kool-aid.’
      • ‘Cover the kernels with the corn stock by one inch, reserving the remaining stock for the garnish.’
      • ‘In a pot, bring cream, milk and corn to a boil.’
      • ‘By sticking an ear of dried corn on top, he lured squirrels to charge up the board and then spin around for a dizzying ride.’
      • ‘Add the corn kernels, garlic, and shallot and sauté until tender, about 30 seconds.’
      • ‘His challenge was to eat creamed corn and cod liver oil.’
      • ‘Using a grater set over a bowl, grate the corn kernels off the cobs.’
      • ‘Two ears of Long Island corn, slathered in butter and salt.’
      • ‘Popcorn has never tasted so good to Lavonne Sanders, an entrepreneur who has turned popping golden kernels of corn into a lucrative business venture.’
      • ‘Zein is a corn protein making up about half of the protein found in the corn kernel.’
      • ‘Had my child not been in my arms, I probably would have dragged you out of your cart and shoved my ear of hot buttered corn down your red neck.’
      • ‘As she walked into the kitchen The Captain was just in the process of heaping handfuls of the kernels into the corn popper that was already heated up.’
      • ‘I waded through enough surf-and-turfs and enough creamed corn to last a lifetime.’
      • ‘Add the corn kernels and simmer until tender, about five minutes.’
      • ‘I look over at Mory, who is pushing around a corn kernel with her fork.’
      • ‘There were separate spoons for soup, corn, and ice cream.’
      • ‘Push the corn kernels to the side of the pan; add the sugar and allow the sugar to caramelize.’
      • ‘Christopher says his biggest failure was cream corn.’
    2. 1.2
      North American, Australian, and New Zealand term for maize
      • ‘The surrounding farmers raise sugar beets, corn, and sunflowers for oil.’
      • ‘As a youngster and teenager, I grew up on a big farm in the country where my father grew large crops of sugar beets, potatoes, corn, and alfalfa every year.’
      • ‘Traditional rural staples are sweet potatoes, manioc, yams, corn, rice, pigeon peas, cowpeas, bread, and coffee.’
      • ‘Spittlebugs especially like strawberries, corn and legumes.’
      • ‘This year Neville won 18 first and second place prizes for his grasses, which include maize, clover, corn, wheat and many more grown on his farm at Caniaba.’
      • ‘Steer away from safflower, sunflower, corn and sesame oils, as well as polyunsaturated vegetable oils.’
      • ‘They also eat grains such as Chinese sorghum, corn, millet, oats, and buckwheat.’
      • ‘Crops produced by these projects include mahango, maize, groundnuts, corn, cotton and various vegetables.’
      • ‘The Pomak economy is based on agriculture and their major crops include rye, barley, corn, flax, potatoes and tobacco.’
      • ‘Amta payments are available for barley, corn, upland cotton, oats, rice, sorghum, and wheat.’
      • ‘They grow lettuce, corn, parsley, sugar cane, rice and radishes.’
      • ‘He has three agricultural centres growing rice, corn, maize and peanuts.’
      • ‘Polyunsaturated oils, such as flax, corn, hemp, safflower, sesame and sunflower, have at least two gaps.’
      • ‘The major agricultural products are wheat, rice, barley, corn, sorghum, sugarcane, potatoes, and fruits.’
  • 2informal Something banal or sentimental.

    ‘the film is pure corn’
    • ‘Alexander's Ragtime Band is pure corn but rather tasty all the same.’
    • ‘The appetite audiences have for sentimental corn should never be underestimated.’
    • ‘God, will I forever be forced to deal with this massive amount of cheese and corn from now on…?’

Phrases

  • corn on the cob

    • Maize when cooked and eaten straight from the cob.

      • ‘Around her, hundreds of people were also enjoying barbecue beef sandwiches and corn on the cob.’
      • ‘This dish is pure luxury: a glorious pile of clams, mussels, corn on the cob, spicy sausage, and a bright-red lobster, all roasted on a bed of seaweed and served table-side.’
      • ‘Dad barbecued some steaks, and Mom made potato salad and corn on the cob.’
      • ‘While the food is unpretentious - steak, corn on the cob, beans, cowboy coffee - it's fresh and of top-drawer quality, and nobody goes away hungry.’
      • ‘My Mom is making an All-American meal: burgers, corn on the cob, freshly made fries, and apple pie.’
      • ‘My eyes nearly popped out of my head when I saw that dinner for the evening was to consist of rough hewn pork, corn on the cob, a messy cabbage-type salad and what I presumed were beef cutlets.’
      • ‘If you like sweetcorn, try the corn on the cob - it was delicious, all barbecued and crispy.’
      • ‘Serve with steak fries, corn on the cob (you can do that on the grill, too), and the simplest salad you can think of.’
      • ‘The ‘pearly whites’ of the corn on the cob, burst sweetly and milkily in your mouth straight off - roasting this variety, at least, was unnecessary.’
      • ‘We had herbed chicken, beef brisket, chili beans, fruit salad and corn on the cob.’

Origin

Old English, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch koren and German Korn.

Pronunciation:

corn

/kɔːn/

Main definitions of corn in English

: corn1corn2

corn2

noun

  • A small, painful area of thickened skin on the foot, especially on the toes, caused by pressure.

    • ‘Most boot related injuries are the same injuries that wearing any tight, stiff shoe can cause, meaning corns, calluses, blisters, and bone spurs.’
    • ‘By choosing appropriate footwear and keeping feet free of blisters, calluses and corns, we increase the body's general well being.’
    • ‘His feet did not sweat normally and he had huge corns over his weight-bearing areas of the big toe, the heel, and the heads of the deep bones of the toes.’
    • ‘But Mrs Ruthven warns the fad could lead to corns, bunions, calluses, claw toes, hammer toes - even arthritis and lower back problems.’
    • ‘On the toes, reactions to a pressure point are called corns.’
    • ‘From my 25th year, I have been suffering from corns on the feet.’
    • ‘Common problems are bunions, hammer toes, corns and pain in the balls of the feet.’
    • ‘See your doctor if you have foot pain or corns, or if you can't trim your toenails well.’
    • ‘She wore cheap tennis shoes with holes cut out for corns or bunions, something painful.’
    • ‘A variety of products are available over-the-counter for the treatment of common foot problems, such as athlete's foot, onychomycosis, foot pain, corns, warts and bunions.’
    • ‘In addition, soaking your feet in warm water or with Epsom salts can alleviate painful corns and calluses.’
    • ‘Wearing improperly fitting shoes on a daily basis causes foot problems such as calluses, corns, hammertoes, bunions, and more.’
    • ‘Metatarsal pads can also be used to change the alignment of the toes to relieve pressure on soft corns.’
    • ‘That Bo Jackson, he can do anything, I once went to a brunch with him and my feet were covered with corns and after a handshake with him they were gone.’
    • ‘How many corns, bunions, ingrowing toenails, pads of rock-hard skin and blisters are hidden away under tights and woolly socks?’
    • ‘Bunions, blisters and corns sound gruesome - and they are.’
    • ‘Deepika is my foot guru who, in half an hour, will transform my unattractive foot complete with corns, calluses and untidy-looking toes into a thing of beauty.’
    • ‘The accessories that come with it: corns, hammertoes, bunions, ingrown toe nails, calluses, and the list goes on.’
    • ‘See your regular doctor or a foot-care specialist for calluses, corns, bunions or warts.’
    • ‘Maybe they would have given me blisters or bunions or corns.’

Origin

Late Middle English: via Anglo-Norman French from Latin cornu horn.

Pronunciation:

corn

/kɔːn/