Definition of corky in English:

corky

adjective

  • 1Resembling cork.

    ‘corky lesions on apples’
    • ‘Between these fibres is the corky substance called ‘coir pith’ or ‘coir dust’ and as such a by-product of the fibre industry.’
    • ‘The texture of the mature perianth of the Salicornioideae may be soft and characterized as membranous, pithy or chartaceous or hardened, appearing crustaceous, corky or woody.’
    • ‘A spongy or corky material fills the base of the perigynia in these and related Carex species.’
    • ‘As the potatoes grow, the spots may expand and turn corky and necrotic.’
    • ‘Trees on the floodplains often have modified bark structures; such as corky bark in Sesbania formosa and B. acutangula, and papery bark with internal longitudinal air passages in Melaleuca species.’
    • ‘When the melting pot is finally empty, you are left with weird, corky bark which itself is a talking point.’
    • ‘The nuts enclosed in this have thick, corky shells, which are difficult to crack; but the slim kernels, white inside a pale brown skin, have a good, delicate flavour and repay the effort of extraction.’
    • ‘The juncture between leaf stem and tree branch slowly seals itself off, forming a corky layer called the abscission zone.’
    • ‘When the cup-shaped fruits open, the seeds drop into the water and, buoyed by their corky coats, are carried by the current.’
    • ‘Some varieties, for example Riesling, have corky lenticels scattered over the skin.’
    • ‘These pests cause cloudy spot, a condition characterized by white or yellow spots or patches on tomatoes and white corky tissue beneath these chlorotic surface blemishes.’
    • ‘Two trunks grew close, one sprouting strange corky warts and the other deeply furrowed.’
    • ‘It has been widely suggested that phellem, a corky outer layer derived from the cork cambium may function as aerenchyma, but until now no-one had tested that hypothesis.’
    • ‘Why do some of my apples have corky, brown blotches on the surface?’
    • ‘It is also called the Cork Tree, as an inferior cork is processed from its corky bark.’
  • 2(of wine) corked.

    ‘a musty quality in all three bottles tasted caused some judges to call this wine corky’
    • ‘When a cork is contaminated with TCA it makes the wine that comes into contact with it stink and taste bad and we say the wine is corked or corky.’
    • ‘If the Davis researchers could use their NMR to measure corky off-flavor - a more widespread spoilage problem - then the system might find more use, Henick-Kling says.’
    • ‘And our very own Wine and Spirit Association, WSA, took for ever to publish its own findings and when it did, in typical ostrich fashion it claimed that corky wines hardly existed in the UK.’

Pronunciation

corky

/ˈkɔːki/