Definition of coquette in English:

coquette

noun

  • 1A flirtatious woman:

    ‘her transformation from an ice maiden warrior into a winsome coquette’
    • ‘The poor man, caught senseless by the little coquette, dropped his mallet and his cheeks began to redden with embarrassment.’
    • ‘And she's one of the biggest coquettes in town.’
    • ‘On the contrary, our current courting practices - if they can be called that - yield an increasing number of those aging coquettes, as well as scores of unsettled bachelors.’
    • ‘Mary, who had always been a little coquette and didn't change her ways despite the fact that she was to be married, talked gaily with all the earnest men surrounding her, although they'd been warned against pursuing anything.’
    • ‘She, too, delivers a dual personality: the innocent young college girl Doc feels obligated to protect; and the little coquette, taunting Turk with promises she has no intention of fulfilling.’
    • ‘The coquette Lady Betty Modish is led to accept the suit of the honourable Lord Morelove (contrasted with the boastful and immoral Lord Foppington) by a plot to excite her jealousy, followed by reproaches from Sir Charles.’
    • ‘Of course, the nurses I worked with were not exactly coquettes sending out pheromones of enticement.’
  • 2A crested Central and South American hummingbird, typically with green plumage, a reddish crest, and elongated cheek feathers.

    • ‘Southeast Brazil has a wealth of special birds, few more impressive than the tiny Festive Coquette.’
    • ‘Possible candidates for most beautiful bird of the morning were a group of Bay-headed Tanagers. But my favorite came just after lunch - my target bird for the trip: A Rufous-crested Coquette.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: French, feminine of coquet wanton, diminutive of coq male bird, cock.

Pronunciation:

coquette

/kɒˈkɛt/