noun

mass noun
  • 1The exclusive and assignable legal right, given to the originator for a fixed number of years, to print, publish, perform, film, or record literary, artistic, or musical material.

    ‘he issued a writ for breach of copyright’
    ‘making an unauthorized copy would infringe copyright’
    count noun ‘works whose copyrights had lapsed’
    • ‘In most countries, organisations have been created which control the exercise of copyright in performing and recording rights.’
    • ‘The possession of copyright in published material may also lead to a conclusion of dominance if the relevant market is drawn tightly.’
    • ‘One good reason to register is to establish a public record of your copyright.’
    • ‘Sometimes when copyright on a film expires, all sorts of stakeholders come forward.’
    • ‘Please be sure all reprints retain the original copyright, source, and author name.’
    • ‘But for the vast majority of musical artists, their copyrights are a woefully inadequate tool for leveraging their way to a mass audience.’
    • ‘Now they seem to think that out of print and out of copyright are the same thing.’
    • ‘They claimed that his new material infringed their copyright on some of his old songs.’
    • ‘This sort of thing is entirely acceptable in the pop world, as long as the end result does not infringe the original copyright.’
    • ‘The legal system protects intellectual property through patents and copyright.’
    • ‘Unlike copyright, patents give holders exclusive rights to a technology for a set number of years.’
    • ‘Some universities claim outright copyright on any materials produced by academic staff.’
    • ‘It compels the sharing of that amount between the owner of copyright in the artistic work and the owner of copyright in the literary work.’
    • ‘The most common argument in favour of the distribution of exclusive copyrights is that they provide an incentive for artists and scientists to create their works.’
    • ‘We think of creative work as a purely human thing, and wrap invention in mystery and legal monopoly of copyrights and patents.’
    • ‘Many choose to register their works because they wish to have the facts of their copyright on the public record and have a certificate of registration.’
    • ‘Every modern legal judgment concerning copyright, from the Berne Convention to the Betamax case, is on my side.’
    • ‘Standards New Zealand came and explained the legal implications around copyright.’
    • ‘This could be sound, pictures, movies or texts that have no copyright, in legal terms.’
    • ‘When creativity is stifled by copyright, the original intention of the law is lost.’
    licence, legal protection, right, performing right, permit, privilege, charter, franchise, registered trademark
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1count noun A particular literary, artistic, or musical work that is covered by copyright.

adjective

  • Protected by copyright.

    ‘permission to reproduce photographs and other copyright material’
    • ‘It is a groundbreaking attempt to protect a fictional storyline with a patent, rather than relying on copyright protection.’
    • ‘Why were so many fans outraged when Tubular Bells was released recently with digital copyright protection?’
    • ‘And judges seem to take a much dimmer view of any tampering with copyright protection.’
    • ‘Equally, Barry may not have made any move on supporting copyright protection technology.’
    • ‘Up for discussion still is how to treat the circumvention of copyright protection mechanisms.’
    • ‘To qualify for copyright protection under the Berne Convention there must be no requirement to register or deposit copies of a work.’
    • ‘Forthcoming EU legislation could criminalise Europeans who circumvent copyright protection.’
    • ‘Creating devices that circumvent copyright protection measures is a violation of the DMCA.’
    • ‘They invent a new form of copyright protection which is then broken by hackers.’
    • ‘The Register will act as a proving ground for existing copyright protection schemes and as a test bed for future technologies.’
    • ‘InterTrust has been developing copyright protection and management mechanisms for digital data for a decade or more.’
    • ‘The following sites contain useful information on copyright protection in various parts of the world.’
    • ‘Title and intellectual property rights are protected by the copyright laws and treaties.’
    • ‘This very diversity means that the purpose behind copyright protection may not always be the same.’
    • ‘This document is protected by applicable copyright laws and international treaties.’
    • ‘Having a few years of copyright protection is a good incentive.’
    • ‘The whole point of copyright law is to protect works even when they are broadly published.’
    • ‘There's a huge cost that's incurred when you increase copyright protection.’
    • ‘Where, for instance, is the actual damage caused by extended copyright protection for books?’
    • ‘Be this as it may, as was seen earlier, form was not important in the attraction of copyright protection in the present case.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Secure copyright for (material)

    ‘copyrighted music downloaded illegally from the Internet’
    • ‘I might draw a parallel here with scientists copyrighting genes.’
    • ‘Those found making a living by counterfeiting copyrighted products face a jail sentence of up to seven years.’
    • ‘He sits and trolls the internet, and steals copyrighted articles and passes them off as his own.’
    • ‘The playing pitch must be open, not patented and copyrighted every step of the production and delivery process.’
    • ‘This should come as no surprise - they did consider the idea of copyrighting the word ‘Pride’ a number of years ago.’
    • ‘Until now, it was legal in Sweden to download copyrighted movie and music files, but making them available for sharing was unlawful.’
    • ‘Henzteeth, one of Scotland's first dedicated copyrighting agencies will open for business this week.’
    • ‘It's also quite amusing that the material is copyrighted to a limited company.’
    • ‘I mean, imagine sitting in a bar and realizing the person two seats down is dropping copyrighted company names every other sentence.’
    • ‘Owners receive a certificate to this effect, which prohibits others from copyrighting their work without permission.’
    • ‘Copylefting involves copyrighting a program and then adding specific distribution terms that give everyone the right to use, modify and redistribute the code.’
    • ‘It is mainly used to download copyrighted files of music, video, etc.’
    • ‘The picture, above left, is copyrighted to Ruvan and is one of several to feature on the band's website.’
    • ‘This haiku is copyrighted and the Warrant Mark scheme is trademarked.’
    • ‘The software and the networks may now be legal - but using them to swap copyrighted songs is theft.’
    • ‘If the hymn or song is copyrighted, it is necessary to go to the copyright holder to ask for this permission.’
    • ‘Rights to copyrighted music are more in their hands than in those of the artists who wrote the songs.’
    • ‘The four students were forced to say they will not pirate copyrighted music on purpose and will shut down their search services.’
    • ‘The computer industry has now grown to such dimensions that copyrighting a software product does not satisfy the appetite of powerful sections of the industry.’
    • ‘Until recently, creative people have had two options in sharing our work: copyrighting it and reserving all rights, or releasing it to the public domain.’

Pronunciation

copyright

/ˈkɒpɪrʌɪt/