Definition of coping stone in English:

coping stone

noun

British
  • 1A flat stone forming part of a coping.

    • ‘Some of the walls border Leeds City Council owned houses and traditional coping stones have been replaced with white concrete slabs.’
    • ‘It seems he didn't know what happened on the line to Cheltenham where it was at once found that the cylinders were too wide and cut away the coping stones of the platforms on the whole of this section.’
    • ‘One staff member's car was written off only weeks ago when coping stones were dropped on to the roof.’
    • ‘The water level was about six feet below the bank coping stones, but during the deluge the water level rose so much that it completely covered the banking.’
    • ‘I want to get a stonemason to carve the mileage (27 miles London - Cambridge 24 miles) into some coping stones when I renew the front North South boundary wall.’
    • ‘A large section of Yorkshire coping stone was ripped from the boundary wall of Manor Garth Park, Bridge Street on Friday night.’
    • ‘After last year's victory Jack bought paint and, along with neighbour David Preston, cleaned and painted coping stones on garden walls in his street.’
    • ‘Vandals have destroyed a natural well by smashing coping stones - exposing a 5ft square hole filled with about 4ft of water.’
    • ‘The corner to Green Lane, a track, is wooded and walled, though part of the wall has gone and the curved coping stones are similar to some in the village.’
    • ‘Suddenly the coping stones of the archway came down.’
    • ‘The coping stones on the west gable have all been lifted to incorporate lead flashing.’
    • ‘At least one criminal gang is targeting properties in Oldham and stealing items like roof slates, coping stones, flagstones and walls.’
    • ‘The stonework in that area has been chipped, and is defaced by their practice of rubbing the boards on the coping stones.’
    • ‘A leak may actually be caused by masonry cracks, loose coping stones, window sealants or other wall- and glazing-related problems, so there may be no need to reroof.’
    • ‘The wall was partly rebuilt in May, but left without coping stones on, leaving it open to weather damage.’
    • ‘Inspection covers for the arches have been removed on occasions and coping stones weighing half a ton or more have been pushed off.’
    • ‘The spokesman said: ‘There will be measures to deter skateboarders by thickening slabs, reducing overhangs and providing ornamental railings around the coping stones.’’
    • ‘After going away for a long weekend, Mrs Wright, 58, returned to her home in Newcroft Close to discover that her coping stones had been removed all along her 50 ft garden wall.’
    • ‘A young man, clean-cut, sharp and fit, perched above us on the coping stones of the top of the seven feet high wall.’
    • ‘Neighbour Paddy Comerford, who was sitting on his front doorstep opposite the house when it collapsed, said: ‘I could hear the roof creaking and I saw one of the coping stones come up four or five inches.’’
    1. 1.1 The highest stone in a building, wall, or structure.
      • ‘But in the absence of a CDS, this structure is like an arch without a coping stone.’
      • ‘Suddenly the coping stones of the archway came down.’
      • ‘Inspection covers for the arches have been removed on occasions and coping stones weighing half a ton or more have been pushed off.’
      • ‘In 1870 (or 1871 depending on the source material), lightning struck the spire, dislodging a coping stone.’
      • ‘The water level was about six feet below the bank coping stones, but during the deluge the water level rose so much that it completely covered the banking.’
    2. 1.2 A finishing touch or crowning achievement.
      ‘the coping stone in Rattle's Birmingham plans was the completion in 1991 of the Symphony Hall’
      • ‘Far from the first attack, it was the copestone of eight years marked, roughly annually, by attempted or successful terrorist operations.’
      • ‘The universe is finished the copestone is on, and the chips were carted off a million years ago.’