Definition of cookhouse in English:

cookhouse

noun

  • 1A kitchen or dining hall in a military camp.

    • ‘It reminded me of the classic cookhouse you'd find on a working ranch.’
    • ‘And with a ship docking it can run to 850 people tucking in at the cookhouse.’
    • ‘Better still, I was entitled to double rations in the cookhouse.’
    • ‘Three times daily we all marched to the cookhouse to dine.’
    • ‘But outside, there was a sort of bench and tubs where they used to wash, and then you went along a boardwalk to the cookhouse.’
    • ‘Later Guy Butler turned the old cookhouse at the village into an accommodation hostel.’
    • ‘Initially dining rooms were uncommon: men messed in small groups in their rooms, with food collected from the cookhouse by one of their number.’
    • ‘The Army padre led prayers for the war dead, their families, for the armed forces and for politicians in their efforts to create peace, during services held in a concrete aircraft hangar and a tented cookhouse.’
    • ‘He joked that he only received the Military Medal ‘because I kept the cookhouse supplied with kindling wood!’’
    • ‘In the Army, soldiers were fed by lining them up at the cookhouse door and then dumping food on their held-out plates.’
    • ‘British Army engineers detonate them in between planes taking off and landing in a series of controlled explosions that have become as routine to the troops guarding the airport as going to the cookhouse for breakfast every morning.’
    • ‘Visits were also made to cookhouses, messrooms and officers' messes, and the royal couple were presented to non-commissioned officers and their wives.’
    • ‘In its dormitories, there are more than 300 cells, four chapels, guest-rooms and a cookhouse.’
    • ‘Between the homestead and the mill, Rutherford constructed huts for the workers, a cookhouse and a dining room which doubled as a hall, complete with library and piano.’
    • ‘Mr Williams said Montgomery's tactical unit included a series of mobiles housing a map room, cookhouse, offices, stores and even a mobile church.’
    • ‘By 1992, however, the Nation opened a health center and later built a cookhouse, a council house, a playground, and recreation facilities.’
    • ‘The operation had been delayed and Corporal Green, who was to accompany the unit as chef, was returning to the cookhouse when the gun went off.’
    • ‘They had a cookhouse with a wood stove and if you spoke out against management, you got put on the punishment block, you chopped wood all day.’
    • ‘Good, you can get down to the cookhouse and cook it.’
    • ‘Danish culture is reflected in the design of towns, especially the ‘step streets’; street names; ovens and cookhouses; and red roofs.’
    cooking area, kitchenette, kitchen-diner, galley, cookhouse, bakehouse, scullery
    View synonyms
  • 2An outdoor kitchen in a warm country.

    • ‘On the most northerly island, Nornour are the remains of a Bronze Age settlement - shrine, dwelling, cookhouse and midden in such fine condition that it seems only just abandoned.’

Pronunciation:

cookhouse

/ˈkʊkhaʊs/