Definition of cook-maid in English:

cook-maid

noun

  • A female domestic servant who cooks or is an assistant to a cook.

    ‘the establishment consisted of a cook-maid, a coachman, and a little footboy’
    • ‘The Gentlewoman's Companion, or A Guide to the Female Sex, contains directions as to the correct behaviour for cook-maids, dairymaids and chambermaids.’
    • ‘This from my rich old Uncle Ned, Thanking me for my annual present; And saying he last Tuesday wed His cook-maid, Molly -- vastly pleasant!’
    • ‘They were called cooks, sometimes qualified as man-cooks, master-cooks, cook-maids, professed cooks, principal cooks, or even (in the case of La Chapelle on the title-page of The Modern Cook, 1733) 'chief cook'.’
    • ‘Despite considerable domestic duties, perhaps working at one time as a cook-maid in the neighbourhood, she produced a distinguished body of work.’
    • ‘More indicative still, however, is a proverbial usage common to Win and Mary the cook-maid.’
    • ‘A number of Swift's later poems on Irish subjects incorporate similar versions of the "cook-maid" theme, however, especially within the so-called Market Hill group of poems.’
    • ‘He dictated to his footman a letter to the "seer" expressive of a wish to know the future destinies of his fellow-servant, the cook-maid, and what sort of husband the constellations had, in their benign influence, assigned her.’

Pronunciation

cook-maid

/ˈkʊkmeɪd/