Definition of convert something to one's own use in English:

convert something to one's own use


  • Wrongfully make use of another's property.

    • ‘If I were to take something of value from you - without your express permission - and convert it to my own use for my own profit, would that count as stealing?’
    • ‘Any person so doing shall be presumed to have the intent to convert it to his own use.’
    • ‘Every person entrusted with any property as bailee, lessee, tenant or lodger, or with any power of attorney for the sale or transfer thereof, who fraudulently converts the same, or the proceeds thereof, to his own use, or secretes it with a fraudulent intent to convert it to his own use, shall be guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor.’
    • ‘It may be taken by stealth with such intent, or it may be taken with the owner's knowledge through fraudulent practice, by which the owner was induced to give up possession without parting with the title or right to the property, and if the taker receives it under such circumstances intending to convert it to his own use and thereby deprive the owner thereof, the crime is larceny.’
    • ‘Thereafter, defendant took away the severed sugar canes that were Mr. Jackson's with a value of $50.00 without Mr. Jackson's knowledge or consent and with intent to convert it to his own use.’
    • ‘Conversion is sort of like embezzlement: You have the rights to manage something, and you convert it to your own use.’
    • ‘It is possible that it may have been proved to the jury that this flour was really intended to be shipped on account of the plaintiff, and that the defendant did not mean to convert it to his own use.’
    • ‘Mr. Lyons told the client he would deposit the client's $35,000 in his trust account to prevent the lawyer from collecting, convert it to his own use, and the client could recover the money from the Lawyers’ Fund for Client Protection.’
    • ‘The Court ruled that a federal criminal statute forbidding conversion of government property required a showing that the defendant knew the property belonged to another and intended to convert it to his own use.’
    • ‘The cases where personal property is taken by a person to whom it has been entrusted, and who converts it to his own use, present very nice discriminations between ordinary breaches of trust and outright larceny.’