Definition of conversion in English:

conversion

noun

mass noun
  • 1The process of changing or causing something to change from one form to another.

    ‘the conversion of food into body tissues’
    • ‘The exhibits explaining the process of bio energy conversion with sewage water would have been music to the ears of die-hard environmentalists.’
    • ‘The company was experiencing several challenges related to their data analysis, conversion and storage processes.’
    • ‘These structures can be more fully exploited in the process of digital conversion of the material.’
    • ‘The characteristics of the transformed films and of the process by which conversion occurs challenge current models of the stable surfactant film.’
    • ‘After ingestion, the process of conversion of folic acid to the metabolically active coenzyme forms is relatively complex.’
    • ‘The expenditure during the quarter ended June 2002 includes costs incurred towards the process of conversion of the company into a commercial bank.’
    • ‘Within the inalienability of entailed real property was concealed the conversion of Parliamentary seats into a cash value.’
    • ‘In the end, true conversion is an ongoing process, and above all a challenge to ourselves as much as it is to those around us.’
    • ‘Workers were set to resume the final steps of conversion, a process that precedes enrichment.’
    • ‘Consider conversion of existing support units based on availability of contract support in wartime.’
    • ‘How do I know my system works properly after conversion?’
    • ‘But to do the conversion properly people need to know €1 equals £0.787564.’
    • ‘The farm is in the process of organic conversion, and Roger is growing spelt (300 tonnes this year), a nutty and nutritious grain that is a lot easier to digest than wheat.’
    • ‘One farm is about to achieve organic status and another is in the process of conversion.’
    • ‘Any process of conversion must be essentially artificial.’
    • ‘Shortly thereafter, the government proposed conversion from a monarchy to a republic with an elected president replacing the British monarch as chief of state.’
    • ‘It also has the weighty responsibility of inhibiting the conversion of body fat back into glucose for the body to burn (a hangover from our feast-or-famine cave days).’
    • ‘Lasers are able to produce a range of biological responses in tissue determined by the various processes of energy conversion within biomolecules.’
    • ‘To call historical films dishonest or inaccurate, as some historians have done, is to misunderstand the process of conversion of academic history into popular history by forming and employing myth.’
    • ‘Let's assume that our team has the responsibility to build out a Web service supporting currency conversion.’
    change, changing, transformation, turning, altering, metamorphosis, transfiguration, transmutation, translation, sea change
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The adaptation of a building or part of a building for a new use.
      ‘the conversion of a house into flats’
      count noun ‘they were carrying out a loft conversion’
      • ‘On hearing these concerns, the council agreed to market the building for conversion to housing.’
      • ‘At that point, the developer will begin the process of renovation and conversion.’
      • ‘He wonders if any bid has been made to market the property, which is said to need £20 million spending on it, as a house or for conversion into apartments.’
      • ‘Finally he stated that retention and conversion of the existing building was not viable.’
      • ‘With military precision, building conversion went ahead at top speed.’
      • ‘A tremendous boom in cinema building and conversion took place during the next few years and continued unabated until the First World War, by which time there were about 3,500.’
      • ‘There is nothing illogical about treating conversion of buildings other than agricultural ones on their merits.’
      • ‘In the smaller villages only conversion of existing buildings to residential use will be permitted.’
      • ‘Well we're all fairly sad to see the village shop being boarded up for conversion into two houses.’
      • ‘These projects will involve the construction of 1,500 new apartments and the conversion of 1,000 units from existing housing or health facilities.’
      • ‘Planning permission to carry out the major conversion work on the building and create 22 apartments was granted in May.’
      • ‘The conversion of an existing building from a non-occupied use into residential living space typically requires several things to meet the building codes.’
      • ‘The building's conversion into a large gallery required internal reorganization.’
      • ‘Having looked at the project in detail however, I have come to the conclusion that conversion of the building to a shopping centre is not a viable option on a stand alone basis.’
      • ‘If your loft conversion is in a two-storey house, you will have to encase the existing stairs of the house to create a fire-protected means of escape.’
      • ‘There is also an integrated double garage for which there is planning permission for conversion into dual level self-contained accommodation.’
      • ‘Kennet has offered grant aid of £25,000 towards the repair and conversion of the building.’
      • ‘With an attractive beamed ceiling as well as windows to the front and sides, this has potential for conversion to a self-contained flat, subject to the relevant planning permission.’
      • ‘The new scheme involves building 18 new homes on the site plus a partial demolition of the public house buildings and conversion of the rest into four flats.’
      • ‘Apart from minor rebuilding necessary for conversion, the buildings will retain their present appearance.’
      adaptation, reconstruction, rebuilding, redevelopment, refashioning, redesign, restyling, revamping
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2British count noun A building that has been adapted for a new use.
      ‘high-quality cottages and barn conversions’
      • ‘There have been several mill conversions in Little Germany and there are controversial plans to pull down an old factory in the former wool quarter to replace it with a new £8.5 million building.’
      • ‘‘The warehouse conversions in London were really coming of age,’ recalls Wayne.’
      • ‘It's a gorgeous split level apartment on the fourth floor of a school conversion in Camberwell.’
      • ‘Initially he focused on small scale residential conversions but Kennedy's big breakthrough came with the purchase of a disused Baptist church in Edinburgh's Dublin Street.’
      • ‘The accommodation is completed by an impressive attic conversion with separate landing overhead.’
      • ‘The plans for a side extension, replacement of existing roof and loft conversion were considered by the town council planning committee last week.’
      • ‘Over the last ten years in the Craven District Council area, permission was granted for 188 conversions and 188 new buildings.’
      • ‘Much of the work relates to house extensions and conversions where applications have increased by 40 per cent.’
      • ‘Andy's flat (I suppose I should call it an apartment really) is a beautiful loft conversion - one of those one big room affairs.’
      • ‘The conversion also includes holiday accommodation, which will mean the building will be used all year.’
      • ‘Shop conversions have become increasingly popular as traditional corner stores have been forced to close.’
      • ‘The policy also includes new property developments in existing buildings such as barn conversions.’
      • ‘Durable and seamlessly stylish, glossy resin looks beautiful in open-plan areas and warehouse conversions.’
      • ‘Other hot properties in Bradford include conversions at Victorian buildings including Silens Mill, in Little Germany, and Ivegate House, near City Hall.’
      • ‘The scheme was introduced by Labour as part of a wider package of measures to encourage the regeneration of Britain's towns and cities, which included a reduced rate of VAT on residential conversions.’
      • ‘The potential exists to create one - or possibly more - residential conversions.’
      • ‘They include conversions at Victorian buildings including Silens Mill, in Little Germany, and Ivegate House, near City Hall.’
      • ‘Another option may be a loft or basement conversion, or just a ‘re-ordering’ of the space you currently have.’
      • ‘A handful of the buildings are complete town houses, but most are upmarket conversions with Jeeps and Range Rovers parked outside.’
      • ‘Now almost all new homes, including barn conversions, will only receive planning approval if they are sold at below market prices to local people with genuine housing needs.’
    3. 1.3Law The changing of real property into personalty, or of joint into separate property, or vice versa.
      • ‘They may be interests in property, as in actions for trespass and conversion; or interests in unimpaired relations with others, as in causing injury or death to relatives.’
      • ‘Nothing, therefore, has happened except a conversion of one form of property held by the partners into another form of property held by the partners.’
      • ‘It was held that the plaintiffs could successfully maintain an action in conversion against the defendant as they still enjoyed the general property in the car.’
      • ‘A fortunate few have previously negotiated conversion from lease to proper title with the former laird for just the cost of the legal expenses.’
      • ‘Second, he claims a right to possession under the property law principles of trover and conversion.’
    4. 1.4Logic The transposition of the subject and predicate of a proposition according to certain rules to form a new proposition by inference.
      • ‘The operations of conversion, obversion, and contraposition are applied to categorical propositions to yield new categorical propositions - these can become immediate arguments.’
      • ‘This is a known transformation in logic, and is called conversion by contraposition, or negative conversion.’
  • 2The fact of changing one's religion or beliefs or the action of persuading someone else to change theirs.

    ‘he insists that real conversion is a matter of the heart’
    count noun ‘his passion for seventeenth-century literature had led the former atheist to a sudden conversion’
    • ‘They refuse to believe in a religion that allows for adaptation and change, and correspondingly can only see outsiders as people in need of conversion to their belief system.’
    • ‘The most fundamental religious experience of Newman's life was his adolescent conversion to evangelical religion.’
    • ‘A conversion from one religion to another may also help one overcome ambivalence; the imagery used for God may differ from that used in childhood.’
    • ‘As the Marxist creed dissolved, the other two religions have embarked on a process of mass conversion sending missionaries out to the four corners of the globe.’
    • ‘In most observed cases religious conversion did not give rise to a particular ‘capitalist spirit’ or economic success.’
    • ‘Its spread, from about 700 AD, was mainly a peaceful process of gradual conversion.’
    • ‘The texts of these religions give conversion theological significance.’
    • ‘In recent years in the United States and other countries around the world, we are hearing from a new set of commentators about the legacy of the 1970s conversions to new religions.’
    • ‘They were not as amenable to conversion to the official religions of the Roman Empire as the other pagan peoples the Roman has conquered.’
    • ‘A look at the history of conversions in India will make it clear whether conversion is an active or passive process.’
    • ‘Unlike Buddhism, Jainism did not advocate conversion to its religion and it did not spread outside the country.’
    • ‘Recent years have seen the mass conversion to religion of hitherto agnostic parents.’
    • ‘He requested them to investigate the case maintaining that religious conversion was a matter of grave concern which had earlier led to conflicts among other communities.’
    • ‘These tensions over religious liberty come to a head over two types of religious action: conversion and proselytizing.’
    • ‘In the eighteenth century the goal of mission was seen primarily as conversion from idolatry and religious perversion.’
    • ‘The sanction, moreover, would only be applied in cases of formal conversion to another religion.’
    • ‘For now, I wish to move on to the changes this religious conversion made in my life and to me as a person.’
    • ‘We discuss the role of caste in the process of conversion.’
    • ‘James is speaking of those who are for one reason or another incapable of religious conversion.’
    • ‘Adolescence and young adulthood is also the life stage when religious conversion is most likely to take place.’
    spiritual rebirth, regeneration, reformation
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1Christian Theology Repentance and change to a godly life.
      ‘the individual's responsibility in conversion is to repent and believe’
      • ‘The literary masterpiece Barrow draws on to illumine the path of conversion and repentance is Dante's Purgatorio.’
      • ‘Paul's conversion was a life-long process that consisted of any number of revelations and encounters with the living Spirit of the Risen Christ.’
      • ‘Saturday morning I lectured for another three hours on conversion and repentance.’
      • ‘Only in and through the process of conversion and practical change do we have access to the God of Jesus Christ.’
      • ‘The monastery, that is to say, is a place of continual repentance, of constantly renewed conversion.’
      remorse, contrition, contriteness, penitence, sorrow, sorrowfulness, regret, ruefulness, remorsefulness, pangs of conscience, prickings of conscience, shame, guilt, self-reproach, self-condemnation, compunction
      View synonyms
  • 3Rugby
    count noun A successful kick at goal after a try, scoring two points.

    ‘Gavin Hastings landed one penalty and one conversion’
    • ‘Marcus Edwards, Scarborough's influential fly half, was instrumental in most of Scarborough's scoring, kicking all the conversions and a penalty goal.’
    • ‘Scotland's kicking specialist contributed 71 points - three tries, seven conversions, 13 penalties and one drop goal.’
    • ‘Bob Brown scored three conversions and two drop goals.’
    • ‘Full-back Gavin Douglas capped a fine display with two penalties, two conversions and a drop goal.’
    • ‘Andy Bowness kicked a great conversion to level the scores from the right hand touchline.’
    1. 3.1American Football An act of converting a touchdown or a down.
      • ‘Throw a touchdown pass and then perhaps go for a two-point conversion if you think it's worth the risk, Jeff!’
      • ‘After that go-ahead touchdown, Murdoch ran in a two-point conversion.’
      • ‘If this monotonous mess doesn't end after two overtimes, teams are forced to go for two points on touchdown conversions.’
      • ‘The colleges introduced two-point conversions in 1957.’
      • ‘He bagged two touchdowns, four conversions and a penalty.’
  • 4(in the context of online marketing) the proportion of people viewing an advertisement and going on to buy the product, click on a link, etc.

    ‘you'll see better conversion rates for your local advertising if you include your physical address on your website’
    ‘keeping things simple will improve conversion’
    • ‘Research has shown that an improvement in site speed can increase conversions.’
    • ‘If you improve conversion by 1% you will make $400 a month.’
    • ‘Tweaking your landing page is the most cost-effective way to improve your conversion rate.’
    • ‘Any advertiser who is interested in increasing conversions on their website will find Website Optimizer useful.’
    • ‘Strange as it sounds these logos will in fact reinforce trust and increase conversion rates.’
    • ‘If you see that successful pages all have one thing in common, you can start testing these on other sections to increase conversions across your whole site.’
    • ‘I had a client who got all excited about tiny traffic increases, but I proved to them that a small change could boost conversions by 20%, and they barely cared.’
    • ‘Online businesses continue to focus heavily on customer acquisition marketing, but by redirecting the same level of investment into improving conversion performance, organisations stand to see far greater returns.’
    • ‘He says that some catalogs have seen conversion rates increase by one-third.’
    • ‘Simple adjustments such as color, wording, and content placement have been proven to increase conversion rates by upwards of 40 percent.’
  • 5Law
    The action of wrongfully dealing with goods in a manner inconsistent with the owner's rights.

    ‘he was found guilty of the fraudulent conversion of clients' monies’
    • ‘The legislation will simplify the law on larceny, fraudulent conversion, forgery and embezzlement.’
    • ‘He faces 47 charges of false pretences, forgery and fraudulent conversion between 1995 and April 2001.’
    • ‘After two years on remand, he pleads guilty to charges of fraudulent conversion of clients' funds and is sentenced to five years in jail less remission for good behaviour and the time he has already spent awaiting trial.’
    • ‘This case is not however authority for the proposition that the exercise of a lien against the would-be seller would amount to conversion against the true owner.’
    • ‘Dishonesty is not an essential ingredient of the tort of conversion.’
  • 6Psychiatry
    The manifestation of a mental disturbance as a physical disorder or disease.

    as modifier ‘conversion disorders’
    • ‘It was concluded that the present results provide evidence of a relationship between childhood traumatization and conversion disorder.’
    • ‘What she did have was a form of conversion disorder.’
    • ‘But hysteria lives on today in a different guise - conversion disorder.’
    • ‘Moreover, in this process of hysterical conversion, symptoms are not arbitrary and meaningless phenomena but complex symbolizations of repressed psychological experiences.’
    • ‘As many as 4% of those attending neurology outpatient clinics in the United Kingdom have been estimated to have conversion disorders.’

Origin

Middle English (in the sense ‘turning of sinners to God’): via Old French from Latin conversio(n-), from convers- ‘turned about’, from the verb convertere (see convert).

Pronunciation

conversion

/kənˈvəːʃ(ə)n/