Definition of conventionally in English:

conventionally

adverb

  • 1In a way that is based on what is traditionally done or believed.

    ‘careers conventionally followed by women’
    ‘the atlas is divided conventionally into six continents’
    • ‘Radially sawn timbers give better yields and more stable sections than conventionally milled timbers.’
    • ‘Sell the environmental benefits of renewable energy to customers who want to help reduce the consumption of conventionally produced power.’
    • ‘Conventionally skinned in metal, the penthouse roof drains to a gutter on the north side.’
    • ‘These insulated concrete houses look the same as conventionally framed houses.’
    • ‘Like more conventionally minded artists, he made work that fluctuated in quality.’
    • ‘The green and red tints chosen for the various rooms were conventionally perceived as middle tones.’
    • ‘We thought anyone who was making a living from farming was farming conventionally.’
    • ‘Such films look different from what's conventionally called video art.’
    • ‘He made few other conventionally romantic films.’
    • ‘Organic wheat here sells for 11.6 cents a pound, compared with about 3.3 cents a pound for conventionally grown wheat.’
    1. 1.1 In a way that shows concern with what is held to be socially acceptable.
      ‘Elisabeth behaved quite conventionally’
      ‘he was dressed conventionally in a grey shirt and trousers’
      • ‘She's a conventionally well-behaved, good girl with a touch of closet anarchism.’
      • ‘Apart from their unique headgear, they dressed conventionally in black attire, even in short skirts with high heels.’
      • ‘These fairies are conventionally well-mannered and alert to humans.’
      • ‘His brother was conventionally dressed last week when, as one of many admiring headlines revealed, his ship pulled off a big cocaine bust during his first week at sea.’
      • ‘The conventionally besuited and predominantly middle-aged "Dickensian Society" shown in the cartoon is a reference to the flourishing Dickens Fellowship.’
      • ‘She demands a true response of herself, not a conventionally acceptable one.’
      • ‘She soon escaped the conventionally respectable life of her parents.’
      • ‘This seemed to sink into him, rather than leaving him unaffected, or making him conventionally polite.’
      • ‘He's not conventionally charming here, but instead uses his charm as a way of making us overlook his serious character flaws.’
      • ‘The subject in his poetry returns from its relegation to the personal and collective unconscious with less conventionally acceptable sets of concerns.’

Pronunciation

conventionally

/kənˈvɛnʃ(ə)nəli/