Definition of contrite in English:

contrite

Pronunciation: /ˈkɒntrʌɪt//kənˈtrʌɪt/

adjective

  • Feeling or expressing remorse at the recognition that one has done wrong.

    ‘a contrite tone’
    • ‘There's nothing wrong with putting your hand up, accepting that you've made a big mistake and saying sorry in an honest, contrite declaration.’
    • ‘Compare and contrast this contrite pose with the self-same penitent jailbound all over again last year as a result of felling two motorists during a wee spell of road rage.’
    • ‘‘It was also clear that he was genuinely contrite and that he had never previously been in any kind of trouble with the police,’ he said.’
    • ‘And so he does not drop to his knees, he is not contrite, he does not sit in the church with the grieving parents and wives and children.’
    • ‘He then issued a contrite public apology for his ‘foolish mistake’ before frantically trying to avoid being tracked down by the media.’
    • ‘I will say that Dolly was contrite over the affair, almost apologetic in fact.’
    • ‘Maybe he's already rehearsing for a contrite resignation.’
    • ‘Prisons are designed to transform a regretted crime into contrite behavior through penalties and punishment.’
    • ‘You can even sell it as a contrite new dedication to safety.’
    • ‘He is very contrite and so sorry and we hug and he tells me he loves me and is so sorry and also is crying.’
    • ‘He knew he was supposed to be feeling suitably contrite and sorry, but there was nothing.’
    • ‘Some were contrite, and apologized directly to the families of those they had murdered.’
    • ‘I am truly contrite, penitent, repentant, remorseful and steeped in the tears of my regretfulness.’
    • ‘I am immensely contrite, and I am sorry for the damage that I've done.’
    • ‘I know the members of the morning show are truly contrite.’
    • ‘I guess this is the point where I should be contrite and say I was ashamed of myself, but I wasn't.’
    • ‘It was a dramatic change in tone, a contrite president uncharacteristically admitting a major failure.’
    • ‘It was striking, although its tone was less contrite than last week's recantation.’
    • ‘She tried to ignore how adorable he looked, all contrite and repentant.’
    • ‘As apologies go, it was about as contrite as you can get.’
    remorseful, repentant, penitent, regretful, full of regret, sorry, apologetic, self-reproachful, rueful, sheepish, hangdog
    ashamed, chastened, shamefaced, conscience-stricken, guilt-ridden, in sackcloth and ashes
    compunctious
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French contrit, from Latin contritus, past participle of conterere grind down, wear away, from con- together + terere rub.

Pronunciation:

contrite

/ˈkɒntrʌɪt//kənˈtrʌɪt/