Definition of constrict in English:

constrict

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Make narrower, especially by encircling pressure.

    ‘chemicals that constrict the blood vessels’
    ‘constricted air passages’
    • ‘Peptides produced in the milk during culturing seem to inhibit chemicals that constrict vessels and increase blood pressure.’
    • ‘The last image he remembered from that time long ago was two strong hands clutching his throat, squeezing the life out of him, constricting his air flow.’
    • ‘As a result, caffeine dilates your pupils, speeds your heart rate, constricts your blood vessels, raises your blood pressure, and tightens your muscles.’
    • ‘Other pollutants, such as nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide, irritate the eyes, constrict air passages and lower the body's resistance to colds and other respiratory illnesses.’
    • ‘The band constricts the stomach, thus producing a small pouch with a narrow opening into the lower stomach.’
    • ‘It can also constrict blood vessels and cause chest pain or irregular heart beats.’
    • ‘Because high blood pressure constricts the blood vessels in the uterus that supply the baby with oxygen and nutrients, the baby's growth may be slowed.’
    • ‘Chemicals inhaled from cigarettes constrict tiny blood vessels in the skin, thus reducing the oxygen and nutrient supply to delicate facial tissue.’
    • ‘This will help constrict the blood vessel and stop the bleeding.’
    • ‘Pilocarpine drops may be used to constrict the pupil and re-establish circulation of aqueous humor.’
    • ‘It speeds the heart rate, constricts blood vessels, and can raise blood pressure to dangerous levels.’
    • ‘In colder temperatures, the heart tolerates less exertion because the body reacts to cold by constricting small arteries.’
    • ‘Results indicate that while cocaine did constrict brain blood vessels in men, it failed to do so in women.’
    • ‘It increases the heart rate and blood pressure, constricts the small blood vessels under your skin, causes changes in blood composition and metabolism, and increases the production of hormones.’
    • ‘Doctors treat shock by stabilizing blood pressure with medications that increase the heart rate, constrict large blood vessels, or increase the volume of blood the heart pumps.’
    • ‘All forms of hypertension can constrict the blood vessels in the uterus that supply the fetus with oxygen and nutrients.’
    • ‘This enlargement constricts the urethra so the flow of urine is reduced, making it increasingly difficult to empty the bladder.’
    • ‘She'd climb on with a bit of a problem, her tight little shirt wouldn't allow her too much freedom and the narrow stilettos constricted her feet.’
    • ‘Clinicians should remember to ‘fill up the tank’ before attempting to constrict the vessel.’
    • ‘In both cases, nicotine is absorbed and may constrict blood vessels and raise blood pressure.’
    narrow, become narrower, make narrower, tighten, compress, contract, become smaller, make smaller, shrink, draw in
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    1. 1.1no object Become narrower.
      ‘he felt his throat constrict’
      • ‘Matt's throat constricted painfully and he dashed, trainers squeaking on the shiny floor, to the high bed, only just stopping himself jumping onto it.’
      • ‘So Alex loved someone, I felt my heart constrict tightly as I registered what he said.’
      • ‘His throat constricted at her innocent teasing.’
      • ‘Her throat constricts, and she swallows painfully, trying to keep her voice steady.’
      • ‘I felt my throat constricting and my hands became clammy.’
      • ‘A weight seemingly pressed on my chest and my throat constricted.’
      • ‘Hot tears sprung into her eyes and her throat began to constrict.’
      • ‘He had wanted to start some form of conversation, but before he could, his throat would constrict in nervousness.’
      • ‘If the sympathetic nervous system is damaged, however, the blood vessels do not constrict and blood pressure progressively decreases.’
      • ‘Choking back a sob, he felt his throat constrict.’
      • ‘As stress can make blood vessels constrict and blood pressure rise, it may also reduce the heart's ability to relax and fill with blood, researchers says.’
      • ‘This junk causes your throat and nose to constrict, immediately reducing lung capacity.’
      • ‘His throat constricts, and he clears it quietly while standing up from his chair.’
      • ‘I felt my throat constrict, and not trusting myself to speak, I nodded.’
      • ‘Without warning my throat constricted and my eyes filled with tears.’
      • ‘It's like my throat is constricting or my lungs aren't working.’
      • ‘His heart constricted tightly in his chest as the wetness seeped into Michael's eyes.’
      • ‘Tears rose swiftly and her throat constricted.’
      • ‘He could almost feel his heart constrict in his chest as he remembered that moment.’
      • ‘He looked so desperate my throat began to constrict.’
    2. 1.2 (of a snake) coil round (prey) in order to asphyxiate it.
      ‘boas constrict and suffocate their prey’
      • ‘The snakes also twist while constricting, in order to break the backs of their unfortunate prey.’
      • ‘I quickly retrieved my digital camera and took this series of photographs as the snake constricted and consumed the bird.’
      • ‘They will kill their prey by wrapping around them and constricting or by pressing them against the burrow walls.’
      • ‘Would you rather be bitten by a poisonous snake or constricted by a python?’
      • ‘It became harder and harder to get a breath as the snake constricted around his ribs.’
      • ‘I saluted my rescuer with a roar and followed him as he swooped down on a giant yellow cobra that was constricting my friend.’
      • ‘But it takes about four minutes for a rat to die of asphyxiation, whereas a snake can constrict a rodent to death in just one.’
      • ‘The pythons have around 250 teeth and catch their prey by biting, grabbing, then wrapping themselves around the prey and constricting it.’
      • ‘The boa nailed the rat immediately and the rat gave out the loudest squeal I have ever heard as the snake constricted him.’
      choke, choke to death, suffocate, smother, stifle
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    3. 1.3 Inhibit or restrict.
      ‘the fear and the reality of crime constrict many people's lives’
      • ‘Having a shirt on probably constricts his creativity.’
      • ‘Then pressure constricted his movement and confidence, and an untimely double fault crept into his game.’
      • ‘Despite two illustrious parents, the company has been severely constricted for cash.’
      • ‘He said shoes constricted his creativity.’
      • ‘She does not want to be constricted by a narrow feminism nor does she accept the cultural burden handed to her as a woman.’
      • ‘But this meant that the economic life of Europe was severely constricted.’
      • ‘And how does your perception of reality enlarge or constrict the life that calls you forward?’
      • ‘It constricts his creativity and his autonomy.’
      impede, restrict, inhibit, obstruct, limit, interfere with, hinder, hamper, check, curb
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Origin

Mid 18th century: from Latin constrict- ‘bound tightly together’, from the verb constringere (see constrain).

Pronunciation

constrict

/kənˈstrɪkt/