Definition of consternate in English:

consternate

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Fill (someone) with anxiety:

    ‘‘Oh dear,’ said Georgiana, looking a little consternated’
    • ‘I was consternated by some of the immediate responses individuals fired off at her.’
    • ‘I have recommended it to every friend I have had who was consternated by what they were facing in corporate structure.’
    • ‘More than once he keeps matters from becoming too ponderous, especially during a recital of crimes his daughter committed, long and surreal and made deeply funny by his air of consternated frustration.’
    • ‘I think initially she was consternated by the whole international thing.’
    • ‘I am shocked, consternated even, by your complete lack of Disciplinary Spirit!’
    • ‘It's easy to see why the University was consternated by the research.’
    • ‘He was consternated, as memories began to flow torrentially back into his mind.’
    • ‘The man, 46, had recently consternated society by marrying an 18-year-old, who was not only younger than his son but also five months pregnant.’
    • ‘An amused and consternated look passed over his face.’
    • ‘The cannibals are consternated, but they give in; he gets the fork.’
    • ‘The talented actress is stuck with the thankless, limited role of Joe's consternated girlfriend.’
    • ‘He consternates his teammates with his inconsistency.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from Latin consternat- terrified, prostrated, from the verb consternare.

Pronunciation:

consternate

/ˈkɒnstəneɪt/