Definition of constellation in English:

constellation

noun

  • 1A group of stars forming a recognizable pattern that is traditionally named after its apparent form or identified with a mythological figure.

    • ‘Part of the constellation Puppis, the star is a tad too faint to see with the unaided eye.’
    • ‘You see thousands of stars arranged in patterns or constellations.’
    • ‘I was lying on the ground in front of someone's house watching the stars, the constellation, Cassiopeia.’
    • ‘Section IV takes us off the land and into comets, galaxies and constellations of stars.’
    • ‘He described hundreds of stars and the constellations and in the Milky Way which had never been seen or even suspected before.’
    • ‘Maria and her father lay out under the stars, naming the constellations.’
    • ‘Like all the other identified extra-solar planets, the body found orbiting the star in the constellation Lyra is a giant.’
    • ‘Centaurus is a southern constellation and its brightest stars are not visible in regions above latitude 29 north.’
    • ‘Look for the brightest stars and constellations first; light pollution or moonlight may wash out the fainter ones.’
    • ‘If you look at the night sky and wish you could name all the stars and constellations, you can.’
    • ‘And in which constellation is that Great Nebula, the constellation which then gave its name to the galaxy?’
    • ‘The centre of our galaxy lies within a cluster of stars in the constellation Sagittarius.’
    • ‘But it is a moving zodiac that no longer bears direct relation to the constellations of stars in whose honour its signs are named.’
    • ‘It represents the constellations Ursa Major and Ursa Minor (the Great Bear and the Little Bear) in the night sky.’
    • ‘Instead she tried to name the constellations in the stars.’
    • ‘North of Orion lies a pentagon of stars which mark the constellation Auriga, the brightest of which is Capella.’
    • ‘Even to this day their name is associated with a number of stars, constellations, and astronomical instruments.’
    • ‘Meteor showers are named after the constellations they appear to be coming from.’
    • ‘They played connect-the-dots with stars and came up with constellations that involved mythical figures and stories.’
    • ‘The site's astronomers (in Michigan) annotate the photos, so stars, constellations and planets are all clearly identified.’
    star system, solar system, cluster, nebula
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A group of associated or similar people or things.
      ‘no two patients ever show exactly the same constellation of symptoms’
      • ‘In the process, a constellation of personal qualities has been derided and devalued, and is in the process of vanishing altogether.’
      • ‘Similarly, data communications, including emergency service, is a natural use for a constellation of such satellites.’
      • ‘This constellation of images, and the devil in its dialectic, is nicely captured in this passage.’
      • ‘In each case, the same constellation of notions emerges.’
      • ‘He clearly delineated the constellation of today's fine art world by flowing and following the mainstreams.’
      • ‘The Defense Department has not yet selected all of the future locations for its new constellation of overseas facilities.’
      • ‘In fact, I visualize the constellation of events and characters in my novels with these pictures.’
      • ‘The constellation of these artists and their painted and sculpted expressions is impressive in its rhetoric and spectacle.’
      • ‘However, this improved prognosis is seen only when one finds the complete constellation of diagnostic features.’
      • ‘That morning, a peddler on Broad Street had extended a constellation of needle marks into her path, hand holding a fake plastic flower.’
      • ‘If women present with a different constellation of symptoms, they're less likely to associate those symptoms with heart disease.’
      • ‘The map of Europe is dotted with a constellation of spa towns.’
      • ‘What a constellation of small joys Sunday turned out to be.’
      • ‘The bullets found easy victims and a constellation of flashing lights lit up the smoke-filled cabin, accompanied by a staccato roar.’
      • ‘Perhaps it says a lot for the depth of Brazil's squad that they have advanced to the latter stages bereft of such a constellation of talent.’
      • ‘A whole constellation of imaging products is now maturing into commercial viability.’
      • ‘Both of these are definitely important considerations that capital owners weigh, but they are amongst a constellation of many others.’
      • ‘Rather, its impact is felt through people's concern with a constellation of ideas which are linked by the fact that they are presupposed by social Darwinism.’
      • ‘He has gladly capitulated to a constellation of race-hustling poverty pimps in an repellent effort to hang on at all costs.’
      • ‘They must find the new constellation of goods that the gift represents more attractive than the one they are used to.’

Origin

Middle English (as an astrological term denoting the relative positions of the ‘stars’ (planets), supposed to influence events): via Old French from late Latin constellatio(n-), based on Latin stella ‘star’.

Pronunciation

constellation

/ˌkɒnstəˈleɪʃ(ə)n/