Definition of conquistador in English:

conquistador

noun

  • A conqueror, especially one of the Spanish conquerors of Mexico and Peru in the 16th century.

    • ‘The Spaniards knew that they could not take on the whole Aztec Empire since they were so many compared to the number of conquistadors.’
    • ‘When the Spanish conquistadors arrived in South America in the 16th century, the giant vulture was a common sight.’
    • ‘When the Spanish conquistadors brought their Catholic faith to the shores of Mexico, the intensity of their religious zeal made the conversion of hundreds of thousands of Indians an important goal.’
    • ‘Soon enough, the Spanish Crown would need an enormous amount of ingenuity and resources to keep such competitors out of the profitable pilfering operation mounted by a handful of conquistadors in the Indies.’
    • ‘The application of science, especially new technology, to the means of production, communication, and coercion, gave Europe a penetrative capacity far in excess of anything available to merchant venturers and conquistadors.’
    • ‘But during the 1520s Spanish conquistadors, fresh from the conquest of Mexico, invaded the land of the Pipil.’
    • ‘Yet wine is an inescapable part of the landscape too, ever since the Spanish conquistadores started planting their first vines in the 16th century.’
    • ‘I remember my first few assignments analyzing journals written by conquistadors and sixteenth-century mariners involved in the African slave trade.’
    • ‘Their effectiveness, however, was limited by the opposition of the conquistadores.’
    • ‘There is a beautiful filmed reconstruction of the Aztec capital, Tenochtitlan, one of the biggest and most magnificent cities in the world before the Spanish conquistadors tore it down to build Mexico City.’
    • ‘Peruvian cuisine has had many influences - from Indians and Spanish conquistadors, who made Lima their South American capital, to waves of Italian, Chinese, African and Japanese immigrants.’
    • ‘For a millennium before the arrival of Spanish conquistadors in the early sixteenth century, great cities flourished close to what is now the lively Peruvian coastal city of Chiclayo, as they did elsewhere in Peru.’
    • ‘In order to encourage social acceptance of such unions, Anglos claimed that elite Mexican women were the racially pure descendants of the Spanish conquistadores.’
    • ‘Controlling an empire that included modern Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and parts of Chile and Argentina, the conquistadores fell to fighting among themselves.’
    • ‘And they were here for less than a century before they fled the Spanish conquistadors who arrived in Peru in 1532.’
    • ‘With the conquistadors came Roman Catholic priests and brothers to bless, or challenge, Spanish attacks upon indigenous peoples.’
    • ‘Yet, as with the army, the government had the greatest difficulty in controlling would-be conquistadores.’
    • ‘Not thinking much of the local cactus brew, Spanish conquistadors in Mexico begin distilling the Aztec's pulque and come up with a mezcal wine.’
    • ‘The Spanish conquistadors encountered the highly evolved Inca Empire when they invaded Peru at the beginning of the sixteenth century.’
    • ‘We know more about the Incas than their Andean predecessors because of their fateful contact with the Spanish conquistadors in the sixteenth century.’
    winner, champion, conqueror, vanquisher, conquering hero, hero
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 19th century: Spanish.

Pronunciation:

conquistador

/kɒnˈkwɪstədɔː/