Definition of congress in English:

congress

noun

  • 1A formal meeting or series of meetings for discussion between delegates, especially those from a political party, trade union, or from within a particular sphere of activity.

    ‘an international congress of mathematicians’
    • ‘At the same time, the party congress was instructive in exposing the political background of the latest round of anti-foreigner and German nationalist agitation.’
    • ‘At a party congress held in Berlin on August 27, Germany's recently founded Left Party adopted its program for the federal election due to take place on September 18.’
    • ‘He said the party had decided to hold the party congress by the end of the year, so that it could have a greater influence ahead of the 2006 general elections.’
    • ‘Apart from some holiday speeches at their recent congress, the Socialist Party has been unwilling to even raise a finger against his measures.’
    • ‘The citizens' insurance model favoured by the party congress is a two-sided coin.’
    • ‘The GAA's national congress in April will vote on changing its structure, which would allow its smaller central council to make a decision on ending the ban.’
    • ‘At party congresses, the revisionists, who argued for a reconciliation with the existing social order, were regularly outvoted.’
    • ‘He said the next plenum of the central committee, scheduled after local party congresses from August this year to before March next year, will touch upon personnel matters for a new party leadership.’
    • ‘It is now preoccupied by a fight with the left for control of the party at its congress this month.’
    • ‘One might as well propose steak tartare for the banquet of the next world congress of vegans.’
    • ‘The panelists, members of a national government advisory congress, intervened and heard the student out, according to one witness and accounts by others posted on the Internet.’
    • ‘The power to decide on a candidate to steer Namibia's boat for the next five years lies in the hands of delegates taking part in next weekend's extraordinary congress of the Swapo Party.’
    • ‘Just a few months later, she won a majority of the votes at the party congress in Dresden in the election for CDU deputy chairperson.’
    • ‘Madisha was speaking at the sixth annual national congress of the SA Municipal Workers' Union here.’
    • ‘Hundreds of psychologists from all over the world attend our annual conventions, and hundreds of U.S. psychologists attend international congresses and other overseas meetings each year.’
    • ‘He said the party's national congress was the only body that could change the UDM's position.’
    • ‘Finally, she was cheered frenetically at the party congress, where she was elected by a membership that did not want to hear about any more dirty business.’
    • ‘In the end, two party congresses were held instead of one.’
    • ‘The very notion of an ‘Indonesian’ women's congress foregrounded its nationalist drive.’
    • ‘In the past, disputes at Green party congresses were often vehement and passionate, although usually conducted on a very low level.’
    conference, convention, seminar, colloquium, symposium, consultation, forum, meeting, assembly, gathering, congregation, rally, convocation, summit, synod, council, conclave
    View synonyms
  • 2A national legislative body, especially that of the US. The US Congress, which meets at the Capitol in Washington DC, was established by the Constitution of 1787 and is composed of the Senate and the House of Representatives.

    ‘legislative power is held by a 72-member National Congress’
    ‘changes in taxation required the approval of Congress’
    • ‘Some Democrats in Congress apparently think the same is true of the United States.’
    • ‘The Congress stood on the steps and sang together, both Democrats and Republicans.’
    • ‘He ought to go to the Congress of the United States if he wants to wage war.’
    • ‘There is only one problem: Congress has not yet made available any money for the program.’
    • ‘Soon, the White House and Congress will cut deals, and some funds will be restored.’
    • ‘This is his way to win the votes for the Republican people up in Congress.’
    • ‘Then, as now, Republicans controlled Congress and Democrats the White House.’
    • ‘The Congress of the United States and the president of the United States unite.’
    • ‘If the Republicans are going to control only one house of Congress, then it would be best if it was the Senate.’
    • ‘The president of the United States is going to the Congress of the United States.’
    • ‘This motion will be presented to the House of Delegates at Congress in April.’
    • ‘The House of Representatives is the larger of the two Houses of Congress.’
    • ‘The President didn't ask Congress to pass a law to give him such authorization.’
    • ‘Now they are holding midnight sessions of congress to overturn 19 state judges and interfere in people's most personal decisions.’
    • ‘It takes money to run the Department of Justice, and Congress controls the purse.’
    • ‘Sign up for the rally now or send a message to your Senators and Representative in Congress.’
    • ‘On the next day, Congress chose George Washington to be its commander in chief.’
    • ‘As you know, I have spend most of week up on Capitol Hill covering the Congress.’
    • ‘She could get seven years and says she plans to take her case to the United Nations and the U.S. Congress.’
    legislature, legislative assembly, parliament, convocation, diet, council, senate, chamber, chamber of deputies, house
    View synonyms
  • 3(often in names) a political society or organization.

    • ‘The National Congress of Indians provides national leadership on issues facing tribal communities throughout the United States.’
    • ‘The Congress of Neurological Surgeons exists to enhance health and improve lives worldwide through the advancement of education and scientific exchange.’
    • ‘The American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine serves people with disabling conditions by promoting rehabilitation research and facilitating information dissemination and the transfer of technology.’
    • ‘Her next job was at Central Australian Aboriginal Congress, as a Child Health Coordinator.’
  • 4mass noun The action of coming together.

    ‘sexual congress’
    • ‘Just as we tired of lugging the water, the men tired of not enjoying sexual congress.’
    • ‘The narrator and Anne take a seaside holiday, during which the prospect of sexual congress is anticipated.’
    • ‘There are so many euphemisms for the act of sexual congress.’
    • ‘I'm sick of the adolescent way this makes me feel, the adolescent way it makes me talk, the nervousness creeping into sexual congress.’
    • ‘But the really amazing part was that Maria had never had sexual congress with a man before, and was thus a virgin.’
    • ‘There was formerly a tribe of South Sea islanders who, until discovered by explorers, had never made the connection between sexual congress and pregnancy.’
    • ‘As might be expected, any suggestion of female sexuality or of sexual congress outside of marriage is treated as immoral and shameful.’
    • ‘He tells us, for example, that in the Elizabethan period ‘it was customary for men and women to have sexual congress almost fully clothed’.’
    • ‘It would be ideal if all sexual congress took place between consenting couples in love but unfortunately this is unrealistic.’
    • ‘Her choice to have or not have children is reconsidered with each menstrual cycle and with each sexual congress.’
    • ‘This does not mean that he has, or attempts to have, sexual congress with these women, especially against their will.’
    • ‘Indiscriminate sexual congress in teenagers is regarded as wholesome.’
    • ‘The dictionary says that ‘tupping’ describes what rams do to ewes but I first came across it being used in relation to human sexual congress.’
    • ‘While society has thankfully moved on from the ignorant days when homosexuality was a crime, it is still against the law to indulge in any kind of sexual congress in a public place, and quite rightly so.’
    • ‘In taking such excessive, evasive action he was not the only eminent Victorian to be sickened by the idea of engaging in sexual congress.’
    • ‘Violent husbands offer excuses that range from the wife not doing housework, her frequent visits to her parents' home, or refusing the husband's request for sexual congress.’
    • ‘Even with sterile people, there is a symbolism in the union of male and female that speaks to the core nature of sexual congress and its ideal instantiation.’
    • ‘Victorian prudery did the rest, followed in quick succession by an unhealthy determination to class sexual congress as obscene and therefore not to be discussed, far less celebrated.’
    • ‘Your situation is not unlike the girl who permits everything but the textbook definition of sexual congress so she can say she's a virgin.’

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting an encounter during battle): from Latin congressus, from congredi ‘meet’, from con- ‘together’ + gradi ‘walk’.

Pronunciation

congress

/ˈkɒŋɡrɛs/