Definition of conflation in English:

conflation

noun

mass noun
  • The merging of two or more sets of information, texts, ideas, etc. into one.

    ‘the forceful conflation of two traditions’
    • ‘Its richness is partly derived from the conflation of wildly disparate images.’
    • ‘Offering up the tired conflation of religion with mega-violence is hardly a positive reason for disbelief.’
    • ‘The opening idea of the last movement sounds startlingly like a conflation of the two major allegros from the ballet suite.’
    • ‘The caricature is really a conflation of several separate styles of thought and belief, and they almost never come together.’
    • ‘What we see is the near total conflation of news and entertainment.’
    • ‘The brash 1875 iron bridge is concealed by his idiosyncratic conflation of the two banks.’
    • ‘The desire to be thought tough is of course itself the real weakness, and the lazy conflation of meaning and justification is simply foolish.’
    • ‘One way this happens is through their conflation of memory with other activities.’
    • ‘The narrator's invocation of loss is as strategic as his conflation of genders in his vision of his Muses.’
    • ‘Both floor and wall-mounted pieces emphasized the witty conflation of drawing and sculpture.’

Pronunciation

conflation

/kənˈfleɪʃ(ə)n/