Definition of confederal in English:

confederal

adjective

  • Relating to or denoting a confederation.

    • ‘France and the UK want a confederal Europe, with states retaining power and Europe run by the Council of Europe, made up of the Prime Ministers of the member states.’
    • ‘He concludes by recommending the establishment of federal or confederal representative governments as a means of maintaining some degree of democracy.’
    • ‘Some would say loose-knit states, such as Canada or Switzerland, mostly confederal in character.’
    • ‘Others are confederal or consociational, explicitly preserving in legal form some social identities within themselves.’
    • ‘The proposed constitution prompted widespread debate arguments addressing the benefits and risks of federalism versus confederal arrangements, leading eventually to the Constitution taking effect in 1789.’
    • ‘Although the specifics of the debate have changed, the nature of the debate between the parties, such as whether the plan should be conceived as a federal or confederal solution, has remained the same.’
    • ‘The urge toward division which principally threatens large multinational states of a federal or confederal nature has not spared even the earliest ‘civilized’ and centralized states of Europe.’
    • ‘The Transnistrian stance did not change much from the previous position favoring a confederal approach.’
    • ‘Federal, quasifederal, and confederal constitutions aren't perfect by any means, and there are plenty of bad precedents to point to in constructing an argument against them.’
    • ‘An appellate system is more characteristic of a developed federal or confederal legal system, and it could be argued that the EC is ready for such a change.’
    • ‘The confederal government shall have various administrative functions.’
    • ‘There is no single state, even confederal, of the North.’
    • ‘That means that it should be federal or confederal, and the component units should have independent taxing and spending authority.’
    • ‘The symbolic reiteration of traditional objectives dispensed with, it went on to suggest more seriously a federal or confederal state, and joint authority as alternatives.’
    • ‘On the whole, as Defranceschi explains, Paoli's idea of union was of a federal or rather confederal kind.’
    • ‘If it could reform rapidly enough to gain legitimacy from its own population, unification could be confederal.’

Origin

Late 18th century: from confederation, on the pattern of federal.

Pronunciation:

confederal

/kənˈfɛd(ə)r(ə)l/