Definition of compromise in English:

compromise

noun

  • 1An agreement or settlement of a dispute that is reached by each side making concessions.

    ‘eventually they reached a compromise’
    [mass noun] ‘the secret of a happy marriage is compromise’
    • ‘Sometimes he could be tough on people, but after they softened, he negotiated reasonable compromises.’
    • ‘Surely with a little flexibility on both sides, it should be possible to reach an acceptable compromise.’
    • ‘Leavers says the ban doesn't have to be permanent - as long as a reasonable compromise is reached.’
    • ‘In this way he believed it would be possible to reach good compromises even when each side was not getting its own way.’
    • ‘Mrs Maguire said the two sides must reach a compromise.’
    • ‘This is not a compromise or agreement, it is just being mealy-mouthed.’
    • ‘Permitting liability, but making it dependent on the employer's ability to control the behavior strikes a reasonable compromise.’
    • ‘Can the police let off a person involved in a shooting incident, even if the two sides have reached a compromise and the victim claims that the gun went off accidentally?’
    • ‘At the center of the dispute is a compromise reached Tuesday to put aside the party asset bill in exchange for opposition support for a makeshift finance measure.’
    • ‘Needless to say, the rift could deal a serious blow to the nation's economy unless both sides reach a compromise as early as possible.’
    • ‘Since in due course it took from February until July to reach an acceptable compromise, it is difficult to follow how the submission of a detailed scheme in November would have produced such a miraculous result.’
    • ‘The two sides struck a compromise on the issue of compensation.’
    • ‘The workable compromise between these extremes involves balancing competing goals.’
    • ‘The center-piece agreement was a compromise to allow competition in supplies of gas and electricity to businesses from 2004.’
    • ‘Political compromises have been agreed on all sides.’
    • ‘So the struggle to find workable compromises gets harder.’
    • ‘The media industry relies on thousands of people to make the compromises necessary to maintain its course.’
    • ‘He said that it appeared likelier that the two sides would reach a compromise on the unresolved matters.’
    • ‘Trade agreements always involve painful compromises, which are difficult for politicians to swallow in a climate of hostility.’
    • ‘It is anticipated that the two sides will reach a compromise and agree a four-year phase-out for Shannon.’
    give and take, concession, cooperation
    agreement, understanding, settlement, terms, accommodation
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    1. 1.1An intermediate state between conflicting alternatives reached by mutual concession.
      ‘a compromise between the freedom of the individual and the need to ensure orderly government’
      • ‘It's a compromise between two logically irreconcilable positions.’
      • ‘Nothing is as simple as turning on and off a light, and thus Cure and Se7en offer a bad compromise between impossible alternatives.’
      • ‘It was a compromise between battery-caged and free-range hens.’
      • ‘We propose an alternative measure of tax incidence that provides a practical compromise between the use of annual income and of lifetime income.’
      • ‘Polly Vernon measures out her relationships in three-minute songbites and asks if there's a compromise between resolutely Rock and completely, madly Pop’
      • ‘Now campaigners claim the Bill - once seen as a compromise between a ban and the statutory licensing of hunting - is being changed to make hunting on horseback virtually impossible.’
      • ‘The emergent dream, like a neurotic symptom, is a compromise between censorship and direct expression.’
      • ‘The abilities of the Lotus engineers to come up with a good compromise between ride comfort and handling remains unparalleled.’
      • ‘It is acknowledged, that in the end, in Web page design, decisions can come down to a compromise between the aesthetics and search engine visibility.’
      • ‘They are obviously the result of a difficult compromise between conflicting landlord and tenant interests.’
      • ‘Every one is a perfect compromise between the real-sounding but forgettable and the memorable but ridiculous.’
      • ‘The handling, for a mid-range hatch, is superb, with an excellent compromise between handling and comfort.’
      • ‘All-round, the dynamic package is a fine compromise between the many potential conditions that a 4x4 vehicle might have to endure.’
      • ‘The air is warm, slightly sweaty, as the compromise between being well dressed and being comfortable starts to tell on those waiting for tables to clear inside.’
      • ‘The free nursing care plan is a compromise between the state providing completely free care and the existing means-tested arrangement.’
      • ‘The new ultra stiff chassis gives the perfect compromise between sporty dynamics and comfortable compliance.’
      • ‘My proposal is a compromise between these two extremes.’
      • ‘However, the new Assembly bill is a compromise between these two extremes and offers an opportunity for real progress.’
      • ‘There are far too many compromises, conflicts and concessions in the AFL and now's as good a time as any to make a stand.’
      • ‘Murphy holds that the American republic is founded on a compromise between resistance to authority and civic rituals of justice.’
  • 2[mass noun] The expedient acceptance of standards that are lower than is desirable.

    ‘sexism should be tackled without compromise’

verb

  • 1[no object] Settle a dispute by mutual concession.

    ‘in the end we compromised and deferred the issue’
    • ‘You get along well with others because you don't make undue demands and your willingness to compromise often brings the concessions you want.’
    • ‘The president urged the parties to compromise for the sake of stability.’
    • ‘After the Boston Tea Party in 1774, however, his willingness to compromise vanished.’
    • ‘Though you can be stubborn at times, bring yourself to compromise in disputes.’
    • ‘Rickover was far too rigid to compromise with industry - or anyone for that matter.’
    • ‘But, in fact, they have been able to compromise on several issues.’
    • ‘Rickover's limited ability to compromise gave him a strong need to sacrifice one thing for another.’
    • ‘You may have to compromise in litigation or disputes.’
    meet each other halfway, find the middle ground, come to terms, come to an understanding, make a deal, make concessions, find a happy medium, strike a balance
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  • 2[no object] Expediently accept standards that are lower than is desirable.

    ‘we were not prepared to compromise on safety’
    • ‘Australian mistresses therefore were generally required to compromise on what they imagined to be superior English standards of domestic service.’
    • ‘His sharp lyrics and refusal to compromise combined with an easy humor and winning personality to make him one of the great protest singers.’
    • ‘But basically the books all give the same depressing advice: compromise, settle, tone yourself down, and do it sooner rather than later.’
    • ‘I knew precisely what I was looking for and had just about reached the stage where I was about to compromise and settle for something I wasn't all that keen on.’
    • ‘I don't think we should compromise on those standards.’
    • ‘That means we don't have to compromise on standards, and the parts are designed to work together as a unit.’
    • ‘Lots of CEOs would love to curb those costs without compromising on quality.’
    • ‘Even in this year, films that refuse to compromise have been made.’
    • ‘We simply cannot compromise on policy anymore.’
    • ‘The style is pedestrian but reader friendly without compromising on the quality of the prose.’
    • ‘And that's why we can't compromise on abortion rights.’
    • ‘He may need to compromise in order to get the merry-go-round spinning.’
    • ‘He is willing to compromise on demographic diversity in order to avoid compromising on ideological diversity.’
    • ‘We cannot accept peace if we are to compromise on our sovereignty, on our freedom.’
    • ‘So, you can shop around for lower prices without compromising on quality.’
    • ‘Highly trained and experienced brewers who refuse to compromise make Victory's beers some of the boldest, cleanest ones around.’
    • ‘‘Safety and delivery of service standards is something we cannot compromise on,’ he said.’
    • ‘The question was how far a director should compromise in order to tell a story.’
    • ‘Under this standard, moreover, those who might have been willing to compromise don't have to.’
    • ‘The hands-on publisher has succeeded by refusing to compromise on production standards - and paying attention to a changing Asia.’
    change one's mind, give way, give in, yield, acquiesce, adapt, retract, do a u-turn, eat one's words
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1[with object]Weaken or harm by accepting standards that are lower than is desirable.
      ‘he won't accept any decisions which compromise his principles’
      • ‘They relinquished government rather than compromise their principles of arbitration in workplace relations.’
      • ‘They also compromise routing performance by dedicating CPU cycles to aggregation chores.’
      • ‘He doesn't think that argument is compromised by the fact that premiums account for only 13 per cent of the cost of health care, with the rest coming out of general revenue.’
      • ‘This only serves to compromise racing success.’
      • ‘If you include advertising, separate it from the informational content to avoid compromising your objectivity.’
      • ‘I know I've already compromised my ability to reach the height of my career.’
      • ‘To do so without challenge is to seriously compromise the integrity of The Peak.’
      • ‘We must never compromise safety in our search for a solution.’
      • ‘The deal that the company has done with the unions will compromise to some extent its ability to reduce staffing.’
      • ‘Is there any area on their agenda that has been compromised by the lack of funds?’
      • ‘In the new market economy, how do colleges and universities compete for scarce resources from public and private sectors without compromising their integrity and autonomy?’
      • ‘I will, however, question the assumption that this concession compromises the realist agenda.’
      • ‘You have accomplished visual changes without compromising the editorial content.’
      • ‘This latest round of cultural subversion fatally compromised Wall Street's ability to hold its own against New Deal reformers.’
      • ‘A rash of other private initiatives will compromise government control of space programs in the near future.’
      • ‘Second, there is growing evidence that financial conflicts of interest are compromising the integrity of the clinical research enterprise.’
      • ‘Rubato is used very sparingly, and forward flow is not compromised for the sake of expression.’
      • ‘Their season must have been compromised by the fact that twice they will have three weeks between games.’
      • ‘Marcus represents important ideas in a fluid and entertaining style, without compromising scientific content.’
      • ‘This makes it an excellent choice for developing cross-platform games without compromising performance.’
  • 3[with object] Bring into disrepute or danger by indiscreet, foolish, or reckless behaviour.

    ‘situations in which his troops could be compromised’
    • ‘On the one hand, such behavior can compromise an issue in the short term, for sure.’
    • ‘Young girls were considered unfit for matchmaking because of the danger that they might be compromised.’
    • ‘Where is the president's anger that his administration has been compromised by behavior he claims to believe is unacceptable?’
    • ‘Celtic's easy superiority can lead to an environment in which famous, wealthy young men become complacent and allow their behaviour to be compromised.’
    • ‘But effectively their behavior is treasonist, in the sense that it has compromised the lives of a lot of other Americans and our cause there.’
    • ‘The danger of compromising his position of authority is one reason for not getting too close.’
    • ‘And he wouldn't support it if it compromised our war fighters.’
    • ‘It is far more likely that this was a pattern of behavior in a man who had compromised himself many times before.’
    1. 3.1Cause to become vulnerable or function less effectively.
      ‘yo-yo dieting can compromise your immune system’
      ‘last month's leak of source code will not compromise your IT security’
      • ‘Computer users perform common tasks every day that can compromise the security of their computers and networks.’
      • ‘Very intense training may temporarily compromise your immune system, also making you more susceptible.’
      • ‘Obviously, for those who are HIV + and have compromised immune systems, the risks surrounding hepatitis infection are considerably more serious.’
      • ‘Medical exemptions for vaccinations can compromise group immunity and pose a threat to children and others who really should not be immunized due to underlying health conditions.’
      • ‘For example, in earlier studies, sleep disturbances have been associated with a compromised immune system.’
      • ‘The company is the latest firm to reveal that their users' passwords were compromised.’
      • ‘People don't get Apergillus infections unless they have severely compromised immunity.’
      • ‘Smoking, alcohol abuse and drug use can compromise your health, not to mention your life.’
      • ‘Once this web server has been compromised, the hacking gang uploads a piece of code to the web server.’
      • ‘An attacker can compromise a user's system by getting the user to read an HTML e-mail message or visit a Web site.’
      • ‘It found that 83 per cent of the financial services operators surveyed had had their IT systems compromised in some way within the last year.’
      • ‘You should always check your application coding, because even a well-configured firewall and a patched server can still be compromised.’
      • ‘For example, people with compromised immune systems probably should avoid Enterococcus bacteria, some species of which are associated with nosocomial, or hospital-acquired, infections.’
      • ‘The effect of stress on the body has been well documented: It can compromise the immune system and weaken your ability to fight off illness.’
      • ‘A compromised immune system leaves the door wide open for disease.’
      • ‘On the flip side, what many wireless users don't realize is that going wireless can compromise their network's security.’
      • ‘His liver functions became compromised and he suffered from headaches, lack of sex drive, and heart palpitations.’
      • ‘Exercise combats the inertia that is driving your daughter to eat and is in danger of compromising her physical health.’

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting mutual consent to arbitration): from Old French compromis, from late Latin compromissum a consent to arbitration, neuter past participle of compromittere, from com- together + promittere (see promise).

Pronunciation:

compromise

/ˈkɒmprəmʌɪz/