Main definitions of comport in English

: comport1comport2

comport1

verb

  • 1comport oneselfformal Conduct oneself; behave.

    ‘articulate students who comported themselves well in interviews’
    • ‘So continue to learn how to comport yourself while wearing one.’
    • ‘I think it was a very, very important day in American history, and the judges comported themselves as if it were a very important day.’
    • ‘In particular, how can doctors be persuaded to comport themselves as scientists?’
    • ‘Where their predecessors in the ring had both comported themselves as if points were being awarded for artistic impression, these two stand toe to toe and flail at each other with apparently random fists, knees and elbows.’
    • ‘And on the train back from the Stade de France, his girlfriend who had accompanied him to this city of love, informed him that she was none too impressed by the way in which he was comporting himself.’
    • ‘But nobody bothers to pay attention to the way the subjects comport themselves.’
    • ‘And that's too bad, when you recall the class and comparative refinement of such gridiron heroes as Barry Sanders and Emmett Smith and how they comported themselves following a score.’
    • ‘Of course, the television audience was less interested in the arguments than it was in the performance of the candidates - how they looked, how they sounded, and how presidentially they comported themselves.’
    • ‘I think you can see a little bit of that in the way he comports himself on the course - very relaxed, very composed.’
    • ‘Of course, he has to comport himself differently than the rest of us do when somebody makes an allegation against him.’
    • ‘We are not watching for the outcome of this war: we are participants in it and had better comport ourselves as such.’
    • ‘Zevon was a fine songrwriter and performer who comported himself with great dignity after he announced his fatal illness.’
    • ‘There were the two world wars, during which he comported himself well.’
    • ‘But throughout she comported herself with dignity, went off and studied law and just got on with her life.’
    • ‘And I just think they need to be very, very cautious where they go and how they comport themselves.’
    • ‘Yes, Bob, I'm sweet and pleasant and I can comport myself properly at a family barbeque.’
    • ‘I am sure everyone will comport themselves in a manner appropriate to the event - ideally, that means down to earth, relaxed, and about to do a few magic tricks to break the ice.’
    • ‘The more we watched him, the more we read his speeches and studied his positions, the more we saw him comport himself in debate, the more we learned about his life story, the more our editorial board came to conclude he's a cut above the others.’
    • ‘What about the way modern players comport themselves compared to previous generations?’
    • ‘Sure, she didn't make the cut, but she comported herself well and showed enough skill to indicate that if she played the men's PGA tour regularly, she would be one of the better players.’
    conduct oneself, acquit oneself
    View synonyms
  • 2comport witharchaic no object Accord or agree with.

    ‘they do all that nature and art can do to comport with his will’
    • ‘That would be the option of theistic evolution, which to me is not a logical choice because it requires elements of faith that simply don't comport with science and logic.’
    • ‘That's why it's so much easier in these circumstances to be out of Congress, where you don't have to cast these votes and you can establish distinctions in your mind that really don't conform or comport with the actual legislative choices.’
    • ‘Before we permit democratic institutions to subject an offender to ridicule, scorn, and humiliation, we have to ask whether this kind of punishment comports with evolving standards of decency and the dignity of humankind.’
    • ‘This decision comports with 48 other states and the unanimous recommendations of leading medical and child advocacy groups.’
    • ‘Not only does this comport with the preferences of the American public, but it has practical implications.’
    • ‘Judges are supposed to look at their handiwork and decide one thing and one thing only: whether the ‘system’ the politicians produced comports with the Constitution.’
    • ‘Sure, but that doesn't necessarily mean that it comports with due process to end judicial review when there is a significant chance of exoneration still to be explored.’
    • ‘LFB has an excellent reputation for customer service, which comports with my experience.’
    • ‘Markets do not lead to efficient outcomes, let alone outcomes that comport with social justice.’
    • ‘Similarly, elevated triglyceride levels were reported only among highly exposed workers, a result that also comports with our results.’
    • ‘I was particularly struck by these claims which comport with my research.’
    • ‘This comports with Douglas's observation that humor is sometimes used to counter the heaviness of death and tragedy by asserting the demands of the living.’
    • ‘Now, it can be done in ways that comport with the law, or it can be done in ways that are very dangerous and capable of producing false confessions.’
    • ‘This comports with reports that as many as 79 percent of the 37,000 questionnaire responses were orchestrated by activists.’
    • ‘It follows that religious liberty rights are not in question and that the Pledge policy fully comports with the Constitution.’
    • ‘However, what the Constitution does require is equal treatment of votes cast in a manner that comports with the Equal Protection Clause.’
    • ‘Well, if you have a better explanation, one that equally jumps right in your face, and which equally comports with all the underlying factors and historical developments, I'd like to hear it.’
    • ‘That interest must, however, be scrutinized so that the invocation of the harm principle comports with the underlying rationale for abridging commercial speech.’
    • ‘That this is true is not to suggest that reality always comports with state law and college rules.’
    • ‘Interestingly, when a controversial political or cultural issue is involved, the result this system is expected to produce almost always comports with the tastes, will, or prejudices of the majority.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘tolerate’): from Latin comportare, from com- ‘together’ + portare ‘carry, bear’.

Pronunciation

comport

/kəmˈpɔːt/

Main definitions of comport in English

: comport1comport2

comport2

noun

  • another term for compote (sense 2)
    • ‘Another pair of vases by Kitty Blake found £500 and a comport by H Price £720.’

Origin

Late 19th century: apparently an abbreviation of French comportier, variant of compotier ‘dessert dish’.

Pronunciation

comport

/ˈkɒmpɔːt/