Definition of comparator in English:

comparator

noun

  • 1A device for comparing something measurable with a reference or standard.

    • ‘The spacing of the 1,0 reflections was measured with a comparator.’
    • ‘Using the OAL gauge with the test bullet in place, simply insert the bullet into the comparator and measure the distance from the base of the cartridge.’
    • ‘With the comparator, you can then measure the overall length with that bullet.’
    1. 1.1 An electronic circuit for comparing two electrical signals.
      • ‘The apparatus is constructed of two adders, a comparator and a multiplexer, and the next address is selected from the output of either of the two adders based on the output of the comparator.’
      • ‘A comparator connects to the drain circuitry of the input transistors which supplies and offsets voltage to the comparator.’
      • ‘The stored negative voltage is used as the negative voltage reference of the latching comparator.’
      • ‘In addition, the analog-to-digital converter includes a state machine operable to receive outputs from the comparators and generate a digital output value.’
      • ‘The latching comparator detects any incoming signal that is above the stored negative voltage reference.’
      • ‘It is no better or worse a comparator than the electricity authority.’
    2. 1.2 Something used as a standard for comparison.
      ‘even taking the most favourable comparator the company is about 20 per cent higher’
      • ‘First, in relation to identifying the appropriate comparators, it could argue that the standard could be fixed by looking at a less prestigious hospital.’
      • ‘If there was a material difference between the treatment of the appellant and his comparators, were the chosen comparators in an analogous situation?’
      • ‘But, especially where the identity of the relevant comparator is a matter of dispute, this sequential analysis may give rise to needless problems.’
      • ‘The court affirmed the jury verdict in favor of the professor, concluding that she properly identified a specific male comparator, even though the comparator was outside of her department.’
      • ‘The last two comparators are not comparators in our view because these people are simply not living in a care home, either because they have been moved or because they have never lived in one.’

Origin

Late 19th century: from Latin comparat- ‘paired, matched’, from the verb comparare (see compare), + -or.

Pronunciation

comparator

/kəmˈparətə/