Definition of comparable in English:

comparable

adjective

  • 1Able to be likened to another; similar.

    ‘the situation in Holland is comparable to that in England’
    • ‘Such silk fibre was comparable to an iron fibre of the same measure, Dr. Sebastian said.’
    • ‘The population of Seattle has stayed around half a million, broadly comparable to that of Glasgow.’
    • ‘One, hitting analysis is not comparable to the analysis needed in a contact sport.’
    • ‘Neither of these are comparable to fake medicines in terms of the harm they can do.’
    • ‘Indeed, it claims that the physical energy gained by sleeping is comparable to that gained by eating an apple.’
    • ‘The amount of books she sells in a year is comparable to how many people read a semi-decent blog in a good week.’
    • ‘Is this going to be comparable to the previous three oil shocks, or worse, or easier?’
    • ‘Prices are not yet finalised, but should be comparable to existing cars and will be announced next month.’
    • ‘Most bands these days end up being an experience comparable to chewing on a lemon.’
    • ‘The number of cameras in Bolton is comparable to other boroughs in Greater Manchester of a similar size.’
    • ‘When the capacitor discharges those volts, it delivers an amperage comparable to stun guns.’
    • ‘The basic pay rates of staff in private prisons are comparable to publicly paid prison officers.’
    • ‘The ratio of domestic to international air traffic in China is comparable to the US.’
    • ‘The steering provides feel comparable to running your fingers over the road.’
    • ‘It was a large wooden fort comparable to Disney's Magic Castle of today.’
    • ‘His record in work that is comparable to what's on offer here is decidedly more mixed.’
    • ‘The weather at last constant, fixed in purpose and content, comparable to a summer's day.’
    • ‘They have the further advantage of being comparable to the Home Office data.’
    • ‘Why religious affiliation should be comparable to ethnic origin escapes me, however.’
    • ‘Equally, saving a life that will exist in the future seems morally comparable to creating a future life.’
    similar, close, near, approximate, akin, equivalent, corresponding, commensurate, proportional, proportionate, parallel, analogous, related
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Of equivalent quality; worthy of comparison.
      ‘nobody is comparable with this athlete’
      • ‘It is an action movie with stunts comparable with the best in the martial arts genre.’
      • ‘The course is in top class condition and comparable to any golf club in the country.’
      • ‘His tone was brilliant and the interpretation comparable to the best performances known.’
      • ‘He knows his experience is not comparable to Shackleton's feat of endurance.’
      • ‘It is not classed as a beauty therapy, nor is it comparable to Indian head massage.’
      • ‘Had his team possessed a striker of comparable qualities, the tournament would have been theirs.’
      • ‘Being the third or fourth user of the system is not comparable to being the first user.’
      • ‘Ben yelled as he brought down the sword with force comparable to that of a minor cyclone.’
      • ‘A good bag of fish that was comparable with past weights but the composition of the catch was completely different.’
      • ‘She was comparable with HMS Invincible in firepower and speed but had superior protection.’
      • ‘His achievements are certainly comparable to those of the greatest figures in history.’
      • ‘Despite this, the team was able to produce an image with sharpness comparable to that of Hubble's.’
      • ‘Beware of the hype because no matter what you hear, no hand-held is comparable to a laptop.’
      • ‘I was expecting quality comparable with a DVD or Sky Digital, which we had in the UK.’
      • ‘The best produces distinguished wine, comparable to that of the Rheingau.’
      • ‘The team now aim to improve the quality of the tissue grown in the lab, to make it more comparable with that of a young animal.’
      • ‘The best of their wines are serious and comparable in quality to those from good wine-makers in Baden.’
      • ‘Bad mistake, comparable with that of the citizens of Troy who thought they were getting that horse as a bargain too.’
      • ‘They act as a safety net, comparable with the safety net of a trapeze artist.’
      • ‘The experiences I have described are in no way comparable to what we have to contend with in London.’

Usage

Although the correct pronunciation in standard English is with the stress on the first syllable rather than the second (comparable), an alternative pronunciation with the stress on the second syllable (comparable) is gaining in currency

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, from Latin comparabilis, from the verb comparare (see compare).

Pronunciation:

comparable

/ˈkɒmp(ə)rəb(ə)l/