Main definitions of companion in English

: companion1companion2

companion1

noun

  • 1A person or animal with whom one spends a lot of time or with whom one travels.

    ‘his travelling companion’
    figurative ‘fear became my constant companion’
    • ‘Over the years, the Doctor and his companions travelled both forward and backward in time.’
    • ‘Any known medical condition or information regarding your health should be made known to your travel companion.’
    • ‘If you're traveling with a pet companion then this can often be invaluable.’
    • ‘Outside, sitting at a low table, were my travel companions.’
    • ‘The green leaves have been my companions in all the weathers of my life, and this is where I have come up with the solutions to life's worries and problems.’
    • ‘Can you give a description of each of the companions who will travel with you?’
    • ‘Fear remains a frequent companion along with my resolve and passion to live an authentic life.’
    • ‘Though she wouldn't admit it to herself, she was secretly glad to have a companion to accompany her on her long journey.’
    • ‘His four travelling companions were also stopped from boarding the plane, and the luggage of all six was unloaded.’
    • ‘Traveling companions should know the early signs of hypoglycemia.’
    • ‘My two travelling companions were far better prepared.’
    • ‘I'm also very grateful to my travel companions, who rallied round me, helped me carry my luggage, and looked out for me in crowds.’
    • ‘But my companions and I have traveled very far and very long to find you.’
    • ‘Other cardiac stressors include arguments with travel companions and the lack of privacy in shared accommodations.’
    • ‘This was also the opinion of many of my travelling companions, some of whom travel widely.’
    • ‘She let her clear blue eyes travel over his companions.’
    • ‘For the last hour or so I returned to the dance floor solo, where I had another chance to see how my various travelling companions were getting on.’
    • ‘His consternation increased upon discovering that he had only two travelling companions aboard the entire train.’
    • ‘Paul usually chose one or more companions for his travels.’
    • ‘My two companions regularly travelled here after the attacks, giving what help they could.’
    • ‘Then she passes the diary on to her travelling companions, each of whom write in it too.’
    associate, partner, escort, consort, colleague, workmate, co-worker, compatriot, confederate, ally
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A person who shares the experiences of another, especially when these are unpleasant or unwelcome.
      ‘my companions in misfortune’
      • ‘Adam turned to see Ted, Wilson's friend and ever-present companion in trouble.’
      • ‘We are not apt to fear for the fearless when we are companions in their danger, and Bob's mind was absorbed in possible expedients for the safety of the helpless in-doors.’
      • ‘It has been three evenings since the hobbits, Frodo and Sam, parted from their companions in their journey towards Mordor with the Ring.’
      • ‘Does ‘our’ refer to the speaker and his fellow nationals and companions in arms or to himself and his Beloved?’
      • ‘But you, you who are now my only companions in this humorless existence, you will have my only contribution to the future.’
      • ‘After having been told the names of their companions in this adventure, each filmmaker had to agree to work without any knowledge of what the others were doing.’
      • ‘He is my brother, and I don't want to talk about my companions in this struggle.’
      • ‘Trapeze artists, clowns, and ragamuffins were his companions in this enclosed universe of painted horses and pedlars with their orientalist wares.’
      • ‘Could it be that this missionary contemplative and this contemplative missionary are companions in a joint work of grace?’
      • ‘It was the work of Florence Nightingale and her companions in the Crimea that did more than anything else to establish female nursing as a respectable career.’
      • ‘His companions in the struggle for freedom surrounded him.’
      • ‘How offensive then must I appear and smell to my companions in misery.’
      • ‘He was the man who started that long four-man break, and on the final climb he was the man who soloed away and left his struggling breakaway companions in the dust.’
    2. 1.2 A person's long-term sexual partner outside marriage.
      ‘Steve and his live-in companion’
      • ‘You were friends and lovers, you were companions, you were significant others.’
      • ‘Intelligent and funny and everything I want in a companion, but she haunts me.’
      • ‘The cool thing is that you say, hey, there's probably a million people in the world that I could be happy with as my companion.’
      • ‘Who we wind up with, the husbands and wives and boyfriends and girlfriends and partners and longtime companions are the real heroes of the story.’
      • ‘Friendship is not the most important thing in their lives, but they will stay true to a long-term companion.’
      • ‘Louis, cold fish to her dying breath, allowed himself only private tears and no public expression of regret for his companion and erstwhile lover.’
      • ‘I was supposed to have been married to my long time girlfriend, companion, lover and best friend of many years this past fall.’
      • ‘Our partners are our companions, our soulmates, our loves.’
      • ‘Michael is survived by his brothers, sisters, life long companion Joan, relatives and friends to whom sympathy of the community is extended.’
      • ‘But this overlooks the significant fact that women do choose their partners to be their companions through life and to be the men who parent their children.’
      • ‘I think that I would be the perfect companion for a guy.’
      • ‘I need to find a normal, nice girl who is looking for a life companion, kids, the white picket fence...’
    3. 1.3 A person, usually a woman, employed to live with and assist another.
      ‘she brought along her companion, whose drab attire set off her employer's brilliance’
      • ‘She's gotten herself a girl from the village as a live-in companion.’
      • ‘When Darwin set sail on the Beagle in 1831, he was taken along primarily as a companion for the captain, Robert Fitzroy, who feared growing lonely and melancholy.’
      • ‘Bowing to criticism from various sections and ending her solitude, the zoo authorities have brought a companion for her.’
      • ‘Mears's sister had recently died, and Mears needed companions to live with.’
      attendant, aide, helper, assistant, personal assistant, valet, equerry, squire, lady in waiting
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4Astronomy A star, galaxy, or other celestial object that is close to or associated with another.
      ‘the small, hot, and compact companion of Sirius was discovered in 1915’
      as modifier ‘a small companion galaxy’
      • ‘The existence of such black holes has been inferred in cases where the black hole pulls gas of a companion star that orbits around it.’
      • ‘It was suggested that the red supergiant orbited a companion star that had shredded its outer layers just before the explosion.’
      • ‘The image includes a companion galaxy, seen at the end of one spiral arm.’
      • ‘The theory postulates that every 26 to 30 million years, life on Earth is severely jeopardized by the arrival of a small companion star to the sun.’
      • ‘These details support the theory that the two stars are close enough for accretion to take place and that the companion star is being cannibalised.’
  • 2Each of a pair of things intended to complement or match each other.

    as modifier ‘a companion volume’
    • ‘Graphics of this artwork also were projected as a companion to the worship music lyrics, using computer software.’
    • ‘Britt and company remain reverent to the source material, resulting in tasteful interpretations that stand on their own or as a companion to the original work.’
    • ‘It is safe to assume that the stories were written over much the same time period as the novel; they are now published as a companion to the paperback version of The Fortress Of Solitude.’
    • ‘Results of a parallel mapping effort in the macronucleus, and the correspondence between the two genomes, can be found in this issue as a companion to this article.’
    • ‘The website is a companion to The Family Handyman magazine, which is a worthwhile subscription for the handyman who is moderately advanced.’
    • ‘A companion to this phenomenon can be found on Internet newsgroups like RGP the day after an event is broadcast.’
    • ‘The game was initiated as a companion to the proposed second film.’
    • ‘The set serves as a companion to the 1990 release ‘The Immaculate Collection’.’
    • ‘A companion to the PBS series of the same name scheduled to air in June, this volume details how religious faith inspired the Civil Rights Movement.’
    • ‘The series will partner with a companion Web site exploring the crucial role of behavioral and social sciences in important public issues.’
    • ‘It is a companion to other recent legislation, which deals with New Zealand forces who are going overseas, which in this case is the flip side of visiting forces coming into this country.’
    • ‘It is very well suited as a companion to a complete general textbook, especially the Robbins Pathologic Basis of Disease because of the page references.’
    • ‘It is a companion to the Civil Union Bill, but it stands alone.’
    • ‘As a companion to the movie, it certainly serves its purpose.’
    • ‘This volume is a companion to a soon-to-be-aired Public Broadcasting System film of the same name.’
    • ‘I recommend this little volume to lay and ordained people alike as a companion to daily prayer and as a source for inspiration - and quotations!’
    • ‘This volume, along with its companions, represents a stunning achievement.’
    • ‘That's a companion to the CBS special of the same title.’
    • ‘Nissan's key car was the Tone, targeted at the small MPV market and a companion to the Renault Modus.’
    • ‘Aside from its value as a companion to the various Wu-Tang projects, The Wu-Tang Manual drives home the surreal nature of the entire phenomenon.’
    complement, counterpart, fellow, mate, twin, other half, match
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1usually in names A book that provides information about a particular subject.
      ‘the Oxford Companion to English Literature’
      • ‘Doubleday's Readers Companions are available for Whitfield's novels, Beeperless Remote and Something's Wrong With Your Scale and a companion guide will accompany his next release, Guys In Suits.’
      • ‘A book like the Cambridge companion to Beethoven, whose positive qualities will guarantee it a place on the reference shelf, deserves better.’
      • ‘For that reason alone, it is probably wise to take along a Thai companion, just to help with ordering, though I am sure it would be possible to stumble through without.’
      handbook, manual, guide, reference book, instruction book, abc, primer
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2British dated A piece of equipment containing several objects used in a particular activity.
      ‘a traveller's companion’
  • 3A member of the lowest grade of certain orders of knighthood.

    ‘a Companion of the Order of Canada’
    • ‘In 1997 Coxeter was made a Companion of the Order of Canada.’
    • ‘Twenty-two people were awarded the Order of the Companions of OR Tambo - the highest decoration South Africa bestows on non-citizens.’
    • ‘He's already been made a Companion of the Order of Canada.’
    • ‘He's a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George, and a Companion of the Order of Australia, and in 1991 was awarded the Australian Human Rights Medal.’
    • ‘He was knighted in 1996 and made a Companion of the Order of Australia in 1998.’
    • ‘‘Our national task is to ensure that we act in a manner that reaffirms our deepest respect and support for Fifa, the esteemed Member of the Order of the Companions of OR Tambo,’ he wrote.’
    • ‘Sea and air cadets, junior entrants in the best dressed St George competition, and members of the Companions of the Black Bear swelled the ranks.’
    • ‘He was also given the Order of the Boabab, which South Africans receive for distinguished service in a number of fields, as well as the Order of the Companions of OR Tambo - reserved for foreigners.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]formal
  • Accompany.

    ‘he is companioned by a pageboy’
    • ‘At last, as if wearied even of the monotonous motion that had companioned her so long, she was perfectly quiet - her face still turned towards the door.’
    • ‘We live in terrifying isolation, companioned mostly by imaginary others.’
    • ‘They had companioned her for a while together, boy and ghost, flanking her like sworn knights.’
    • ‘You have to companion it with minimum-wage increases, because otherwise firms will grab it all by pushing down wages.’
    • ‘All the Star Wars movies will be put online eventually (Lucas has confirmed that one), nicely companioning the DVD versions just in case some people daren't leave the message board for too long.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French compaignon, literally ‘one who breaks bread with another’, based on Latin com- ‘together with’ + panis ‘bread’.

Pronunciation

companion

/kəmˈpanjən/

Main definitions of companion in English

: companion1companion2

companion2

noun

  • 1A covering over the hatchway leading to a ship's companionway.

    1. 1.1archaic A raised frame with windows on the quarterdeck of a ship to allow light into the decks below.
      • ‘The three made their way in the dim light to the companion.’
      • ‘The room was illumined from the light in the companion, and the dim lantern hung from the deck beam.’
    2. 1.2
      short for companionway
      • ‘More feet scampered up the companion as his crew belowdecks realized something was happening.’
      • ‘He made his way down the companion to the gundeck, Pamela in his arms.’

Origin

Mid 18th century: from obsolete Dutch kompanje (earlier form of kampanje) ‘quarterdeck’, from Old French compagne, from Italian (camera della) compagna ‘(storeroom for) provisions’.

Pronunciation

companion

/kəmˈpanjən/