Definition of comfort in English:

comfort

noun

  • 1A state of physical ease and freedom from pain or constraint.

    ‘there is room for four people to travel in comfort’
    • ‘Absurdly for something which causes so much damage to its surroundings, the car symbolise comfort, convenience and freedom for the self.’
    • ‘We've learned from our evaluations that physical comfort is much more important to parents than children.’
    • ‘Hence we should devote our most serious efforts to bringing about mental peace rather than physical comfort.’
    • ‘He doesn't sit in his low-slung leather chair so much as melt into it, his body surrendering at once to a rare moment of physical comfort.’
    • ‘It nourishes the desire for things higher than mere physical comfort.’
    • ‘He seemed concerned about your physical comfort as well.’
    • ‘Many travellers enjoy the ease and comfort of train travel and, for those who have time on their side, it's a great way to traverse our enormous country.’
    • ‘These particular do-gooders know what is good for the bulk of people who only want to be able to move around the town with a bit of freedom, ease and comfort.’
    • ‘Although there's little scientific data to support these modalities, they can ease pain and provide comfort for your pet.’
    • ‘With the ease and comfort of airline travel British and European anglers are travelling to warmer climes for their holidays and taking advantage of this exciting fishing.’
    • ‘She appreciates the fact that in Bulgaria, there is all the convenience and comfort of regular utility services like water, electricity, and heating.’
    • ‘Instead, you will have green cover greeting your eyes ensuring physical comfort and mental pleasure.’
    • ‘The suspension system is an assembly of modular pads that offer improved stability on the wearer's head as well as physical comfort.’
    • ‘The modular pads of the suspension system offer improved stability and physical comfort.’
    • ‘For this second mode of reception we, as an audience, have been trained into wanting physical comfort [in the cinema, at home] with food, drink on hand.’
    • ‘You can have excellent peripheral vision and at the same time, ease, comfort and convenience.’
    • ‘Obviously, food selection can have an impact on physical comfort during chemotherapy, when mouth sores and mucositis affect the ability to eat.’
    • ‘Does there seem to be a generous supply of equipment, time and space, physical comfort and well being amongst staff and children?’
    • ‘In certain Eastern religions, sages and adepts may make sacrifices of their own physical comfort in order to receive enlightenment.’
    • ‘Between the three of them they lugged the baggage into the building to the elevator where they traveled up the 13 floors in comfort and ease.’
    1. 1.1Things that contribute to physical ease and well-being.
      ‘the low upholstered chair was one of the room's few comforts’
      • ‘It has a host of modern comforts and conveniences alongside numerous period features throughout its 240 square metres of living space.’
      • ‘Hot dogs and bug juice may be necessary to sustain life, but physical comforts are an essential ingredient to sustain emotional health.’
      • ‘Other comforts include allowing travellers with personal headphones to plug into a variety of music channels and complimentary timetable booklets placed on each seat.’
      • ‘And we surrounded ourselves with personal comforts.’
      • ‘He is, of course, known for his travels within the comforts of the developed world.’
      • ‘They believe that by travelling without the comforts of luxury hotels and first class trains they will truly experience their foreign surroundings.’
      • ‘With the wisdom of those past years we need to tweak it a bit because people like their comforts.’
      • ‘This isn't the first time that students have put the comforts of the western world behind them to help in one of the poorest regions of the world.’
      • ‘When there's nothing left to say, you turn to physical comforts, and pretend that still means something.’
      • ‘We cannot be content with ‘cheap comforts, living a warm and comfortable lie.’’
      • ‘One broad generalization is applicable to all of us in our life: The genetic material we inherit compels us to seek more and more physical comforts and sensual pleasures.’
      • ‘We should have correction centres with no comforts or special privileges such as colour television or pool tables.’
      • ‘During this time Louis XIV was in power and royalty lived in ridiculous comforts while French commoners starved.’
      • ‘Such comforts take the forms of more leisure and ease in life in the field of physical sciences, while in the spiritual field they become rituals and traditions.’
      • ‘It's an even tighter squeeze once he's added the comforts which ease his solitary existence.’
      • ‘Participants have been selected from hundreds of applicants to leave behind their families, jobs and home comforts to live together under one roof and conform to strict house rules.’
      • ‘They can be very selfish where their physical comforts are concerned.’
      • ‘Despite having all the physical comforts we could ask for, we pined for Jimmy.’
      • ‘Lounge into adjustable reclining seats, manipulate the overhead AC vents to your liking and take your fill of the comforts of luxury travel.’
      • ‘In other words, it offers almost all the comforts and luxuries foreign travelers are accustomed to.’
    2. 1.2Prosperity and the pleasant lifestyle secured by it.
      ‘my father left us enough to live in comfort’
      • ‘He had two children with her but his pension was insufficient to allow the family to live in comfort.’
      • ‘The residents and guests of the Grand Hotel live their lives in comfort and splendor, spending their days in the bar or on the dance floor.’
      • ‘A world where some live in comfort and plenty, while half of the human race lives on less than $2 a day, is neither just nor stable.’
      • ‘Idi Amin is still living in comfort in Saudi Arabia.’
      • ‘The pigs on the other hand did not work at all but lived in comfort.’
      • ‘How could this be possible, this unfair life of toil, all for a lethargic baron who lived in comfort?’
      • ‘In our heady economic comfort, we have lived alone and let our neighbor die.’
      • ‘Here, he thought, academics could live in comfort cheek-by-jowl with students in more modest accommodation.’
      • ‘I'm getting to the point where I really could quite happily compromise my morals and standards, find some rich old guy and live a life of comfort and luxury.’
      • ‘Diversion and manipulation are niche marketed, the spectacle of prosperity and comfort is produced, and huge profits are made.’
      • ‘My fortune enabled me to live my life in comfort, but it also gave me too much time.’
      • ‘They are so heavily rewarded for modest finishes that they can live their lives in comfort without having achieved much on their own.’
      • ‘Despite living in wealth and comfort, the family was far from happy.’
      • ‘Make sure our future duchess will live in comfort.’
      • ‘He sends her to live in comfort in a lonely manor-house, only prohibiting her from seeing him or her children again.’
      • ‘Although conditions ran to the squalid, many immigrants preferred saving their earnings to living in comfort.’
      • ‘After all, he enjoyed a high position and was living in comfort and luxury.’
      • ‘Having made it through university, they want to live in comfort and make good money working in places such as Beijing, Shanghai, or Shenzhen.’
      • ‘Today many Han live in comfort, both in the city and the country.’
      • ‘There is a genteel air of comfort and prosperity here and a crisp and clean environment only adds to it.’
  • 2The easing or alleviation of a person's feelings of grief or distress.

    ‘a few words of comfort’
    ‘they should take comfort that help is available’
    • ‘Do we sometimes think of religion as a soother, that it's about making us feel good, or providing comfort and consolation?’
    • ‘Colin, recently bereaved, has been invited to tea by his friends, who whilst they nervously await his arrival, are determined to give him some comfort in his grief.’
    • ‘I don't know what to say, how to express my feelings to the bereaved, whether to offer words of comfort and sympathy or tell them to be brave.’
    • ‘A family, unused to the centre of the stage and broken in grief, draw comfort from the predictability of the rituals.’
    • ‘Always putting foremost the welfare of others, she was, for many years, a Handmaid in Knock where she helped bring comfort, solace and support to those in need.’
    • ‘If someone has the gift of speaking words of comfort and help, he should speak.’
    • ‘He was given words of comfort and sympathy by fellow MPs in the Commons yesterday following the death of his wife.’
    • ‘Tears flowed freely and words of comfort and condolence were repeated over and over to the devastated family.’
    • ‘Her singing had brought great life and joy to many occasions but it had also brought great comfort, support and consolation to those in bereavement.’
    • ‘And I warn you in advance that there'll be absolutely nothing here of comfort or consolation.’
    • ‘As a result of the tragic event of losing a child, these mothers turn to religion for consolation and comfort.’
    • ‘But this was of little consolation or comfort to the latter who for the second year running had lost out at the final hurdle.’
    • ‘He was accepting words of consolation and comfort from his visitors with such a sad and distressed look on his face.’
    • ‘Numerous too were the funeral Masses he celebrated over the years and he was always a source of comfort and consolation to families in times of grief.’
    • ‘The look on his face is one of genuine grief, empathy and comfort.’
    • ‘The couple's only comfort in their grief is that other teenagers may now think twice before getting into a stolen car.’
    • ‘He does, however, see an opportunity for brands to provide consumers with comfort and relief from the anxieties caused by safety fears.’
    • ‘We also wish to express our appreciation to all the family, neighbors and friends for their words of comfort and support during this difficult time.’
    • ‘She always had a word of consolation and comfort to all who had the pleasure of knowing her.’
    • ‘There is something very natural about a funeral from the home in which a person has spent their life and it can also be a source of great comfort and consolation to those grieving the loss of a loved one.’
    consolation, solace, condolence, sympathy, fellow feeling, commiseration
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1[in singular]A person or thing that helps to alleviate a difficult situation.
      ‘his friendship was a great comfort’
      • ‘Once stark, empty stores are filled with the things that few can buy, but the mere presence of such luxuries is a comfort.’
      • ‘It's a dubious and conflicted comfort, but a comfort of sorts.’
      • ‘At the age of 17, when I was homeless, all I had were my thoughts and the comfort of pretending that my situation would improve.’
      • ‘I have also had a number of messages of support from people I have worked with outside the Council and that is a comfort to me.’
      • ‘Now, I look at the last pages of Christopher's and my life together, and his death and funeral and memorial service, and she's done them so beautifully, they are such a comfort.’
      • ‘That allows the money to last longer - a comfort for anyone in this situation.’
      • ‘There can be a comfort in having the public perceive you as a talented coach whose hands are tied by financial restraints.’
      • ‘Jackie reassured her, the news a comfort to her ears.’
      • ‘However, it's a comfort to learn that bacteria and viruses can be eliminated by using only ‘final-rinse’ washing water.’
      • ‘The silence that had slid around her in the cold, dark room was not a comfort or a reassurance.’
      • ‘This is not comfortable listening, but you will find a comfort of sorts within its glacial heart.’
      • ‘In many ways this is a comfort and a consolation.’
      • ‘‘You can only admire the sheer professionalism of our service, which is a great comfort when we are in these difficulties,’ he said.’
      • ‘While a great comfort on long or rough rides, there are some situations where a fully locked differential is a benefit.’
      • ‘As much as that should have been a comfort, a reassurance, it wasn't.’
      • ‘Remembering what she had read about how difficult it was to control wasn't much of a comfort.’
      • ‘It was a comfort to know that there were people around who would treat us kindly.’
      • ‘Knowing you are not the only one in this situation is a great comfort.’
  • 3US dialect A warm quilt.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Ease the grief or distress of.

    ‘the victim was comforted by friends before being taken to hospital’
    • ‘And they comforted her with their presence and with their appreciation and just by the fact that they listened.’
    • ‘I was comforted by the presence of Helen and the new baby and by the support of friends.’
    • ‘They're there for me - they comfort, cajole, coerce, cohort, conspire, and commiserate.’
    • ‘The songs on the album prove meditative, probing, and soothing all at once; they comfort without slipping into naivete.’
    • ‘You do it when the kid is upset, and you have to carry him, and you're trying to comfort him and protect him as you walk.’
    • ‘She doesn't comfort, soothe or sympathise - she is just out to get me as much as she can.’
    • ‘Even if no one ever contacts you this way, just the presence of this information comforts edgy customers.’
    • ‘Stories of her presence comforting soldiers in the trenches of WWI abounded.’
    • ‘They comfort, console, offer hope, inspire humanitarian endeavors, and can inspire work for justice.’
    • ‘My friends try to comfort me by suggesting that any publicity is good publicity and that a picture is worth a thousand words.’
    • ‘How your strength comforts me, my gallant warrior; your love is the armour that protects my soul, even unto death.’
    • ‘Police, medical staff, relatives and friends were today comforting the family.’
    • ‘Something inside me, possibly my instinct, tells me that I should comfort him, consoling him in any possible way.’
    • ‘I held her hand and comforted her, an inadequate gesture for an elderly person about to live on the street in a tent.’
    • ‘Our natural impulse is to soothe, to comfort, to relieve suffering.’
    • ‘But tonight I didn't have the time or strength to comfort her, and at that moment I was just as terrified as she was.’
    • ‘His presence comforts me though - something about his personality makes me feel warm inside.’
    • ‘My instinct is to soothe and comfort; I can never just walk away.’
    • ‘As a consequence the listener really feels soothed and comforted throughout.’
    1. 1.1Improve the mood of or restore a sense of physical well-being to.
      ‘he dined outdoors, comforted by the crackling sounds of the fire’
      • ‘Her former secretary recalls Daphne dispatching her housekeeper on more than one occasion with a Thermos of soup to comfort some ailing don.’
      • ‘Comfort yourself with its minestrone soup, made Sicilian style - pure vegetables, no pasta.’
      • ‘The Cape, with its soft sea breezes, had always comforted Tyianne when she vacationed here.’
      • ‘Refreshed and relaxed, Michiko dined outdoors, comforted by the crackling sounds of the fire and hot bowls of rice with roasted guinea hen.’
      • ‘Players trek into deep jungle and coconut mangroves while comforted by the cool breezes from the ocean.’
      • ‘A refreshing breeze comforted the golfers but hampered their game.’
      • ‘She could vaguely smell his cologne, a smell that comforted her.’
      • ‘Have you ever started a diet one week, only to comfort yourself with an entire pan of brownies the next?’

Origin

Middle English (as a noun, in the senses ‘strengthening, support, consolation’; as a verb, in the senses ‘strengthen, give support, console’): from Old French confort (noun), conforter (verb), from late Latin confortare strengthen, from com- (expressing intensive force) + Latin fortis strong. The sense ‘something producing physical ease’ arose in the mid 17th century.

Pronunciation:

comfort

/ˈkʌmfət/