Definition of come under in English:

come under

phrasal verb

  • 1Be classified as or among.

    ‘they all come under the general heading of opinion polls’
    • ‘For some time, one of my favorite places to eat has been a chain that I suppose comes under the broad classification of ‘fast food’ but not exactly.’
    • ‘And surely complaining about the attack comes under the general category of ‘whinery.’’
    • ‘All these features are under threat from development and mismanagement, and their protection comes under the general heading of Earth-heritage conservation.’
    • ‘Now Peter had to decide what classification he came under.’
    • ‘One of those ravages comes under the general heading of ‘tumours’.’
    • ‘Judging by the blurb it comes under the general heading of an ‘airport novel’ if the back cover is anything to go by.’
    • ‘These come under the general heading of product liability.’
    • ‘All three came under the general heading of ‘natural philosophy’.’
    • ‘The other main arena for scientific projects and expeditions in the UK is archaeology, and this comes under the general umbrella of the Nautical Archaeology Society.’
    • ‘Town driving comes under the same general safety umbrella.’
  • 2Be subject to (an influence or authority)

    ‘for a time they came under the rule of the Venetian doges’
    • ‘The transportation system in Bangalore will witness a major overhaul, with the bus service and the metro coming under a common transport authority, he revealed.’
    • ‘Second, don't expect commercially available software to alert you if you come under the authorities' suspicion.’
    • ‘Early in the war, he came under the influence of a middle-aged alleged mystic, a layman who had taken a vow of celibacy.’
    • ‘However, the convention itself makes it clear that it applies to all situations in which a subject population comes under the authority of a foreign occupier.’
    • ‘Is there any type of character, in your opinion, that is more susceptible to coming under the influence of the Devil?’
    • ‘He said his sister had always been totally anti smoking and drugs and it was not until she came under the influence of an older boyfriend that she started to change.’
    • ‘However, they remained independent until coming under French colonial authority in 1899.’
    • ‘Those who are weak, however, are more ready to come under the care and authority of someone who is stronger.’
    • ‘The answer is that depends on whether the seller or intermediary comes under any regulatory authority and, unfortunately, not all of them do.’
    • ‘The child comes under the authority of the Greek judicial system.’
    1. 2.1 Be subjected to (pressure or aggression)
      ‘his vehicle came under mortar fire’
      • ‘Both vehicles came under heavy fire from a group of men who were apparently lying in wait in bushes on the side of the road.’
      • ‘As an activist, he came under attack from the authorities.’
      • ‘If they fail to take account of local customs, they may come under attack from the authorities, competitors or criminals.’
      • ‘There are six men in the squad, and five of them saw their marriages or relationships come under severe pressure.’
      • ‘The aggressive consumer finance stocks continue to come under selling pressure.’
      • ‘The group could also come under pressure from the aggressive rollout of broadband services by rivals.’
      • ‘In the late 1920s, Russian writers came under severe pressure.’
      • ‘The troops were hit by the exploding vehicle and then came under mortar fire, he told a news conference.’
      • ‘The bill has come under severe criticism and is being redrafted.’
      • ‘Urgent action is required on milk price as dairy farmers in the West are coming under severe pressure, he said.’