Definition of come in English:

come

verb

  • 1no object, usually with adverbial of direction Move or travel towards or into a place thought of as near or familiar to the speaker.

    ‘Jess came into the kitchen’
    ‘I came here on holiday with my parents’
    ‘he came rushing out’
    • ‘They are huge, ponderous things that threaten to get tangled up and knock down anyone who comes near.’
    • ‘If they get upset, they may become curious and come near the boat.’
    • ‘Use your defense moves if anyone that looks suspicious comes near you.’
    • ‘As we come near, their strange familiarity becomes simply strange.’
    • ‘The evil magpie watched in confusion, but didn't come anywhere near us.’
    • ‘When you're in the field, you only have to move if the ball comes near you.’
    • ‘She braced her hands on the wall, getting ready to move if he came another step towards her.’
    • ‘As he comes near he widens his eyes still further and arches his eyebrows in an enquiring expression but she shakes her head and he wanders away again.’
    • ‘No-one would come near the fence because he would start barking.’
    • ‘The man had turned his head on hearing his name, and stood up, stooping under each ceiling beam as he came towards them.’
    • ‘The torch moved, came near his face and light shone over his features.’
    • ‘Well, for one thing it's OK to shriek and run away from the ball if it comes near you.’
    • ‘If a woman wearing it comes near me I start up uncontrollable sniffing behaviour.’
    • ‘I just stared mesmerized at the advancing natural terror as it came quickly towards my home.’
    • ‘As he came towards her, she knew that she should move away, but her feet wouldn't budge.’
    • ‘The men in the bar who had been so eager to drink with him now moved away when he came near them.’
    • ‘He waited for a moment, making sure no one was coming and moved towards the direction the man came from.’
    • ‘They fly or flee when we come near, scared that we might harm them.’
    • ‘Some people swear that he has never come near the left-field line, even to snag a simple pop-up.’
    • ‘If anyone comes near me, I'll just point to my shoes and tell them I'm wired.’
    move nearer, move closer, approach, advance, near, draw nigh, draw close, draw closer, draw near, draw nearer
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Arrive at a specified place.
      ‘we walked along till we came to a stream’
      ‘it was very late when she came back’
      ‘my trunk hasn't come yet’
      • ‘Then the treasure trove panel awarded the stone to Shetland, so it came to our local museum, which is where it would have come anyway.’
      • ‘Whenever you come and wherever you sit, however, you can be assured a pleasant dining experience.’
      • ‘None of this puts you in a good mood, but when they came, the main courses weren't bad.’
      • ‘The woman from her place at her wall saw them come and saw them go.’
      • ‘People came to their doors and windows; everybody came and had a look.’
      • ‘The Brazilian comes straight from his French Open win, full of confidence but with next to no grass court practice.’
      • ‘Most of the guests and people who arrived came with their daughters.’
      • ‘My prediction with the pizza was right and ten minutes after it came, she arrived.’
      • ‘Sometimes it gets almost to Christmas Eve and nothing has come and then suddenly it's there.’
      • ‘The bill came and she reached into her handbag to find her wallet.’
      • ‘I don't think he will because, when he came back to the club, he didn't come as a manager or a coach.’
      • ‘When I arrived, she came outside with the help of 2 other guys who she works with.’
      • ‘The second evening I came late back from work, the first time in six months!’
      • ‘Meg and Jo wait for their mother, but she is late in coming because her train has been delayed by a snowstorm.’
      arrive, get here, get there, reach one's destination, make it, appear, put in an appearance, make an appearance, come on the scene, come up, approach, enter, present oneself, turn up, be along, come along, materialize
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 (of a thing) reach or extend to a specified point.
      ‘women in slim dresses that came all the way to their shoes’
      ‘the path comes straight down’
      reach, arrive at, meet, get to, get up to, get as far as, make, make it to, set foot on, gain, attain
      extend, stretch, continue, carry on, spread
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3be coming Approach.
      ‘someone was coming’
      ‘she heard the train coming’
      • ‘The shape darted behind trees and through the shadows, coming ever closer to the failing glow of the cinders.’
      • ‘Otherwise, in my mind it would have been much too awkward, especially if he felt what she felt as he was coming closer.’
      • ‘By coming so close to earth, the gravitational field will alter its trajectory ever so slightly.’
      • ‘He shook his head, coming even closer until his lips were inches away from her.’
      • ‘I do know an alert crewman had saved us from coming extremely close.’
      • ‘This is what I mean about coming too close to something mean, nasty and permanently polluted.’
      • ‘She swerved into a spot, coming dangerously close to the car next to us.’
      • ‘He was coming closer to me, and I could almost smell his cheap cologne surrounding me.’
      • ‘He kept on coming until we were close, only a few centimeters apart, all I had to do was breathe in deeply and we would be touching.’
      • ‘On the other, Dave is coming dangerously close to overstepping the line of acceptable behavior!’
      • ‘She knew she had looked away too late, and now he was coming closer.’
      • ‘But, as he neared the ground, other instructors noticed that he was coming too close to farm buildings and a spectator area.’
      • ‘I could hear his footsteps on the pavement approaching me, coming faster and faster.’
      • ‘Stacey opened the door to the bathroom, looked out to make sure no one was coming near, and closed it again.’
      • ‘He must have warned them we were coming because as we approached the other two swirled around to look.’
      • ‘I'll be honest and admit that I try always to avoid coming too close to any living soul who may be there, bringing flowers.’
      • ‘He had that evil aura around him and was threateningly coming closer.’
      • ‘As police sirens wailed in the distance, coming ever closer, she called her boys off.’
      • ‘I heard the rhythm of footsteps pound down the hallway, coming ever closer to the holding cells.’
      • ‘He opened his mouth, looking genuinely sorry about coming that close.’
      imminent, impending, close, near, approaching, coming, forthcoming, in prospect, at hand, on the way, about to happen, upon us, in the offing, in the pipeline, in the air, in the wind, in the wings, just around the corner
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4 Travel in order to be with a specified person, to do a specified thing, or to be present at an event.
      ‘the police came’
      ‘come and live with me’
      with infinitive ‘the electrician came to mend the cooker’
      figurative ‘we have come a long way since Aristotle’
      • ‘It is always a living Canadian author, who will come and be involved in events in the community.’
      • ‘If I wasn't happy with that, I don't think I would have come and spoken to the chairman, although I am glad in a way that I did.’
      • ‘So come and chortle, chuckle and giggle your way through a fun filled weekend with excellent stand up comedy and family fun.’
      • ‘A reluctant priest came to his bedside, after Voltaire threatened legal action against him if he did not come.’
      • ‘They might have come and said strong words against Greece.’
      • ‘What matters most is that the people who do come and read are enjoying what I write.’
      • ‘So come and enjoy the event and let's all have a safe and fun-filled day.’
      • ‘If that happens to you in your life, you come and talk to me about it and reassure them that they're safe and sound in your care.’
      • ‘Then the people who did the road works came and dug the path up and found the fault.’
      • ‘If you thought dance-film/video was all about music clips, then come and find out what else it can be.’
      • ‘Some of the people of Elderswood are coming, due to arrive tomorrow as witnesses.’
      • ‘Please come and support the event, which is being held in aid of community care.’
      • ‘This is the final so come and laugh at the ones that made it.’
      • ‘Please come and read the links but don't provide any more hits than your own.’
      • ‘People from every biological discipline you can imagine would come and present their papers.’
      • ‘Please come and support what will be a superb night's cricket.’
      • ‘She comes over to me, sits next to me, puts her hand on my thigh and flicks her hair back, while she demands I come and dance with her.’
      • ‘There were those investors who at least did come and started some ventures of some kind.’
      • ‘But the man had been intimidated in the same way as the rest of the room had, until I had come and freed them from the witch's curse.’
      • ‘And now you come and sit with me and look at our viewers and say here's the truth.’
    5. 1.5with present participle Join someone in participating in a specified activity or course of action.
      ‘do you want to come fishing tomorrow?’
    6. 1.6come along/on Make progress; develop.
      ‘he's coming along nicely’
      ‘she asked them how their garden was coming on’
      • ‘He noticed over the following six months that he was developing symptoms which came on after he had been lifting the heavier kegs of beer.’
      • ‘Early last season, this first-round pick experienced some typical rookie problems, but he came on as the season progressed.’
      progress, make progress, develop, shape up, make headway
      progress, make progress, develop, shape up, make headway
      View synonyms
    7. 1.7in imperative Said to someone when correcting or reassuring someone.
      ‘Come, come, child, don't thank me’
      • ‘Oh, come, come, surely you're pouring extra olive brine into your cocktail?’
      • ‘Before coming to this CPS type approach, someone may say to you, ‘Well, come, come, are you not moving the responsibility for managing staff away from managers?’’
  • 2no object Occur; happen; take place.

    ‘twilight had not yet come’
    ‘his father waited for a phone call that never came’
    ‘a chance like this doesn't come along every day’
    • ‘The sounds are familiar and pleasant, but they belong to another time - a time that has not yet come.’
    • ‘The news, conveyed to customers by letter, comes as a blow to communities in areas like Cross Hills, where local amenities are heavily relied upon.’
    • ‘Yet all this came without the grinding regimen of tuition centres and coaching colleges.’
    • ‘But the pinnacle of her singles career came when she reached the semi-finals of the French Open last month.’
    • ‘The move to sue comes despite concerted action to tackle bullying in schools in the past few years, including a national anti-bullying network.’
    • ‘But this scene, coming as close to the closing moments of the film as it does, confuses things.’
    • ‘It's available right now while stocks last, or until the black helicopters arrive - whichever comes soonest.’
    • ‘The warning in Hull comes after months of violent and abusive encounters between local teenagers and immigrants.’
    • ‘It came without warning, as if a switch flicked, initiating a flood of brightness.’
    • ‘This comes as a blow for many residents who could suffer difficulties travelling to alternative branches and may find that they are overcrowded.’
    • ‘It came only after yet another procedural skirmish about the agenda and the debate was quite chaotic and confusing.’
    • ‘The week passed, and the week when her father was supposed to arrive finally came.’
    • ‘A feint can force your enemy to tie down huge amounts of forces to protect against an attack that never comes.’
    • ‘Every such situation, every routine, is but an illusion, and he who is tempted to believe in it will not be prepared for the blow when it comes.’
    • ‘This comes as a huge blow to the night scene - we have lost the venue that brought us our first ever 16-hour parties!’
    • ‘Getting up is bad enough but when it comes after rolling over onto something cold and slimy it's just all kinds of bad.’
    • ‘It comes near the end of the track, pretty much in the outro, and it adds a cool other layer to the whole mess that's going on.’
    • ‘This comes as a great blow to Yorkshire, who have temporarily installed the shop in the new indoor centre, a place it cannot remain when all the nets are in full use.’
    • ‘For those who haven't seen/read the play, this comes near the end when, alone and rejected, Harry has knocked over all of the chess pieces.’
    • ‘But then the real ‘boom’ is the demand for public appearances that comes as a boon for stars like him.’
    happen, occur, take place, come about, transpire, fall, present itself, crop up, materialize, arise, arrive, appear, surface, ensue, follow
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 Be heard, perceived, or experienced.
      ‘a voice came from the kitchen’
      ‘it came as a great shock’
      • ‘There's simply nowhere to put the patients but it came as a surprise when we heard that adults were being put in with the children's ward.’
      • ‘Her death at the age of 56 came as a shock; she'd recently been touring in Europe and had been planning a US tour.’
      • ‘The conviction, which means I can no longer practice law, came as a total surprise.’
      • ‘This came as quite a shock, and a fairly unwelcome one.’
      • ‘So the discovery that he gave a short, sharp bark whenever his name is mentioned and a long loud howl whenever he hears applause came as a shock.’
      • ‘The dramatic admission came as the court heard the first forensic evidence in the case.’
      • ‘What happened was horrendous and came as a very big shock.’
      • ‘‘It came as a big shock at the time, but it gave us the shove we needed to set up our own business,’ said Sue.’
      • ‘Like others, I found the ending frustrating, but it came as a relief too.’
      • ‘After two false labours, it came as a relief for all of us.’
      • ‘So it came as quite a blow to hear that he was leaving.’
      • ‘So it came as something of a surprise that the dawn of the new Millennium brought nothing but catastrophe and confusion to the aerospace giant.’
      • ‘This came as a surprise after my wife's experience with it last week.’
      • ‘It came as no surprise to me that this woman's music is deep and emotionally honest, just like her name.’
      • ‘He said he was aware of Ben's work but it came as a major surprise to him that the artist was now living in County Galway.’
      • ‘This came as a total surprise to her as she was not aware that the class had proposed her for the flowers.’
      • ‘The admission came as the court heard the first forensic evidence in the case.’
      • ‘It came as such a shock, and our worlds literally fell in.’
      • ‘This came as a surprise to the British Chambers of Commerce.’
      • ‘I have been burgled four times before so it came as no surprise to me when I heard the news although it was still shocking.’
    2. 2.2with adverbial (of a quality) become apparent or noticeable through actions or performance.
      ‘as an actor your style and personality must come through’
      be communicated, be perceived, penetrate, get through, get across, be got across, be clear, be understood, be comprehended, register, be taken in, sink in, be grasped, strike home
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    3. 2.3come across" or British "over" or US "off (of a person) appear or sound in a specified way; give a specified impression.
      ‘he'd always come across as a decent sort’
      • ‘But quite a few of the others come across as frivolous, apathetic, foolish or all of the above.’
      • ‘This puzzles me since I'm told I'm not unattractive and I think I come across as friendly.’
      • ‘Many, however, come across as parodies of the cheerfully uninformed American undergraduate.’
      • ‘I know some of this opinion may come across as very strong, but it is something I feel so strongly about and it is something which I carry around with me everyday of my life.’
      • ‘But those in control, although they want to come across as one of the common people, aren't prepared to give up their handle on power.’
      • ‘Indeed, compared to their Hollywood counterparts, most of the cartoon fish come across as rather dull, failing to make a real impression.’
      • ‘If you introduce a pre-show element, be sure it relates to the show and doesn't come across as a cheap marketing gimmick.’
      • ‘Hence, some of the lines don't come across as winsome as they might otherwise have appeared.’
      • ‘It's true that blogs can be a useful tool for exploring and expressing ideas, and that they come across as relatively dynamic in today's circumstances.’
      • ‘To come across as being an intellectual, one should appear to be very well-read.’
      • ‘After all, I appeared to be a bookworm sort of fellow trying to come across as tough.’
      • ‘As a result, our songs tend to come across as sounding looser than they actually are.’
      • ‘I didn't want to come across as patronising, but I did.’
      • ‘While they appear to be normal - they come across as somewhat false.’
      • ‘I hope that I didn't come across as hostile or anything.’
      • ‘When all is said and done, they come across as a rock 'n' roll Motown wall of sound.’
      • ‘But he actively engaged in bureaucratic ploys so he could come across as the loyal soldier and cover his tracks.’
      • ‘Her character didn't come across as compassionate and concerned, except in how it directly influenced her.’
      • ‘I expect it would come across as a very cold, blustery place, but yet with this sort of eerie beauty of Saturn in the sky.’
      • ‘They are also blissfully unaware that, to serious thinkers, they come across as the kids we hated in high school.’
      seem, appear, look, sound, give the impression of being, have the air of being, have the appearance of being, strike someone as, look as though one is, look to be
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    4. 2.4 (of a thought or memory) enter one's mind.
      ‘the basic idea came to me while reading an article’
      ‘a passage from a novel came back to Adam’
      • ‘And the one which comes immediately to mind, is the current rigidity in the issuance of visas to would-be tourists.’
      • ‘I don't know what triggered this memory but it came and flooded my senses with remembrance.’
      • ‘As the building grew larger and larger with our approach, the thought came unbidden to my mind.’
      • ‘She sinks into her bed, memories and questions coming forth in her mind.’
      • ‘It is the memory that comes even as we walk right now, here on this bend.’
      • ‘A reflection came across her mind and the thought came like a slap in the face.’
      • ‘Kafka's story The Hunger Artist, the tale of an artist whose medium is public fasting, comes most vividly to mind.’
      • ‘The blush only doubled after his speech, imagines coming unbidden to her mind.’
      • ‘The memory of this came unbidden into my mind when I read recently in the papers that beaches for dogs are one of the latest crazes.’
      • ‘I am sure there are others - the above list are just those that come readily to mind.’
      • ‘The image that comes most readily to mind is that of a kettle failing to boil because the lid's been left off.’
      • ‘Avuncular is the word that comes most readily to mind.’
      • ‘What comes immediately to mind is the Multiple Universe interpretation of quantum theory.’
      • ‘I've been trying to think of a slang term for garbage overproducer, but not much comes immediately to mind.’
      • ‘Here the Big Idea came first, and it's the product that's being invented after the fact.’
      • ‘Sentiment is not something that comes easily to mind when it could mean that silverware has to be sacrificed.’
      • ‘So far, though, none of the progressive groups that come readily to mind seem interested.’
      • ‘These are just the ones that come immediately to mind at 6 a.m. after no sleep, I might add.’
      • ‘Yes, it came to me on a train going from Manchester to London in England and it came very suddenly.’
      • ‘An idea was coming quickly to mind, causing his eyes to widen slightly in realization.’
  • 3no object, with complement Take or occupy a specified position in space, order, or priority.

    ‘prisons come well down the list of priorities’
    ‘I make sure my kids come first’
    • ‘Had I ever to garden in a limited space, two plants that would come high on my priority list would be green beans and garlic.’
    1. 3.1 Achieve a specified place in a race or contest.
      ‘she came second among sixty contestants’
      • ‘The American firm of architects which came second in the race is also among one of seven teams up for the job.’
      • ‘Any athlete who comes first, second or third in more than one event should tell the announcer their preference for selection before the end of the meeting.’
      • ‘All those children who came first, second and third in the local athletics event have qualified for the county final.’
      • ‘We had three animals in two classes and they came first, second and third in both classes.’
      • ‘If it comes second you only get the winnings you would have earned if you'd only bet on it to place.’
      • ‘If you come second in a race, you try harder, so that next time you win.’
      • ‘Their next game will be on the 24th or 25th depending on whether they come first or second in Group A.’
      • ‘They have so much respect for writers, even ones that don't come first or second.’
      • ‘Teachers had teams in certain races and unflinchingly came last every single time.’
      • ‘I am thinking of someone like our kayaker in the Olympics, who came second in his race.’
      • ‘Two: the worst thing that can possibly befall a contrada is for its horse to come second; coming last is nothing in comparison.’
      • ‘Luddenden came second last year and third the year before, so villagers are hopeful they are moving nearer to taking top spot.’
      • ‘I entered the contest and came second in the local finals.’
  • 4no object, with complement Pass into a specified state, especially one of separation or disunion.

    ‘his shirt had come undone’
    • ‘As a result, traditional systems of helping the aged are coming apart.’
    • ‘Like his mother and his grandmother, he combed his hair day after day, collecting the hair that came loose.’
    • ‘Things went well until we walked to the jet to preflight and saw the left main tire had started coming apart.’
    • ‘Just when they seemed to be coming apart at the seams, they struck a purple patch and put Wicklow asleep with some wonderful football.’
    • ‘It's all very much more fragile, and could so easily come apart.’
    • ‘There is no seismic movement; the fabric of reality doesn't suddenly come apart at the seams.’
    • ‘Moreover, in the Homeric there exists an acute and graphic sense of how things work, are put together, come apart.’
    • ‘My own bathing attire is coming apart at the hip-side seam.’
    • ‘This film shows the family, especially the dad, coming apart at the seams.’
    • ‘It is very cool because the patented fastener is a yin yang symbol that comes apart but holds securely.’
    • ‘The box didn't so much open as separate, coming apart into two pieces that barely looked like they'd fit together.’
    • ‘The infamous discipline seems to be coming apart at the seams.’
    • ‘It seemed to be coming apart, and that seemed to, if anything, spur the negotiations.’
    • ‘His mind remains sharp, even if his body, in its ninth decade, is slowly coming apart.’
    • ‘So it came to pass that life is coming apart - and just when I needed it to stay together.’
    • ‘It came apart easily, was as boneless as it could be but was a little dry on the outside.’
    • ‘That annoying, ugly, trick gold lamp that comes apart in the middle when you pick it up has been the scourge of my family for years.’
    • ‘She is coming apart, the way a braid does when one has been swimming a long time.’
    • ‘I look at myself and wonder if I'm coming apart at the seams.’
    • ‘Both men suffered facial injuries and one needed surgery to stitch together a piece of skin that had come apart from the left side of his nose.’
    break up, fall to bits, fall to pieces, come to bits, come to pieces, disintegrate, splinter, come unstuck, crumble, separate, split, tear, collapse, dissolve
    View synonyms
    1. 4.1come to/into Reach or be brought to a specified situation or result.
      ‘you will come to no harm’
      ‘staff who come into contact with the public’
      ‘the vehicle came to rest against a traffic signal’
      • ‘However in their earnestness to achieve optimum results some voluntary organisations tend to lose direction, often resulting in their efforts coming to a nought.’
      • ‘On the other hand, if the global conditions continue to push oil prices higher, the Chancellor's attempts to calm the situation may come to naught.’
      • ‘If it comes to a situation where we believe there are organisations that have declared war, then we have to provide defences as if there is a war.’
      • ‘The situation's coming to a head, and he doesn't have many more chances to stall the inevitable.’
      • ‘Grandparents on both sides can also be brought in to help the parents come to a shared care situation.’
      • ‘Essex Police were this week looking into the situation before coming to a decision on whether to contest the merit of the temporary order or not.’
      • ‘With the battle for Spirit Group coming to a head, results from the main listed player in the pubs sector may become of more interest than usual.’
      • ‘After evaluating ratings of articles by medical editors and narrowing the field, the staff must come to agreement on a single entry.’
      • ‘The lead up to Churchill coming to power was the result of the failure of the Munich agreement.’
      • ‘When it comes to a situation where parents' individual interests contravene public interests, there is a need to weigh up all the interests involved.’
      • ‘If it comes to the situation when it's up to me to make the decision, then naturally this will be taken into consideration.’
      • ‘As projects come to completion, all results must be published and there must be no publication without peer review.’
      • ‘That resulted in the judge coming to a different conclusion.’
      • ‘Did you think just two years ago that the situation would come to this?’
      • ‘We may be coming to a situation where whole families, grandparents, parents and weans are all users.’
      reach, attain, arrive at, come to, make
      View synonyms
    2. 4.2with infinitive Eventually reach a certain condition or state of mind.
      ‘he had come to realize she was no puppet’
      • ‘I'm coming to think that biting the hand that feeds me might represent a tasty alternative.’
      • ‘The album, which was two years in the making, is the result of his coming to terms with many issues in his life.’
      • ‘We might act on a preference about what to buy or do, and then come to realize that it was not worth it.’
      • ‘Through the practice of meditation one comes to realize the true nature of mind.’
      • ‘It is merely there for you to have in mind when you come to weigh up her evidence.’
      • ‘Only in the final stages of the conflict did he come to realize that the war was lost.’
      • ‘The defeated ministers are slowly coming to terms with their situation.’
      • ‘Quarter-of-an-hour after the game was over, still out on the pitch, David was trying to soak it all in, coming to terms with the result.’
      • ‘Few great players get to know links courses, though, without coming to love them.’
      • ‘In coming to terms with this situation, teachers need to accept the loss of some traditional deference.’
  • 5no object, with adverbial Be sold, available, or found in a specified form.

    ‘the cars come with a variety of extras’
    ‘the shirts come in three sizes’
    • ‘Different functionalities make it possible to do one thing much more easily or effectively, but they come with a smaller cost elsewhere.’
    • ‘It came with two large orders of mashed potatoes and coleslaw and a bunch of biscuits.’
    • ‘They seem to produce the best images and come with the best feature mix for a reasonable cost.’
    • ‘They come with a coppery glow in the aura and always bring transformation of the soul, if you will let them.’
    • ‘The asking price for the building, which comes with adjoining ramp space, is $4 million.’
    • ‘We order a pavlova that comes with meringue so rock solid and hard we would have been better off with pneumatic drill than a spoon.’
    • ‘Internet radio may be growing, but it doesn't yet come with pictures.’
    • ‘There are only two of these houses, which come with garages, still available.’
    • ‘Take out the material that comes with the thermometer and read it.’
    • ‘The build quality was up to scratch, the cars looked gorgeous and came, of course, with those pacy motors.’
    • ‘The vehicles themselves are designed to accommodate up to four people, and come complete with stowage space for bicycles.’
    • ‘The meals, which cost £3.99 each, come with a choice of four salads plus any drink.’
    • ‘This is how I came to imagine some kind of film thesaurus, a little like the one that comes with a word processor.’
    • ‘I take numerous pills and every container I open comes with a pamphlet warning of possible side effects.’
    • ‘In reality, only the mussels arrived, but came with a rich tomato sauce and a strong but not overwhelming celery edge.’
    • ‘Everything else comes with health warnings, so why not?’
    • ‘The router is also a space saver and comes with an accessory stand that lets you position the device on its side.’
    • ‘It comes with two car-parking spaces at an adjoining property, and there is scope for extension on to the roof itself.’
    • ‘It comes with 25 activity cards each with two sides.’
    • ‘Whether the bulbs come in the mail, or from the local garden center, they usually come with instructions.’
    be available, be made, be produced, be for sale, be on offer
    View synonyms
  • 6informal no object Have an orgasm.

    climax, achieve orgasm, orgasm
    View synonyms

preposition

informal
  • When a specified time is reached or event happens.

    ‘I don't think that they'll be far away from honours come the new season’
    • ‘Saying that, the siege mentality that the players have displayed will doubtless be beneficial come Euro 2004.’
    • ‘Five years may have slipped away since my grandad's passing, but come Saturday he'll be there next to me again.’
    • ‘And he predicted that the continuing fall-out from the war could prove crucial come polling day.’
    • ‘If come January, he's way ahead in the polls, Clark will be able to get away with this approach.’
    • ‘And, likewise, a Republican defeat now would only make them leaner and stronger come 2008.’
    • ‘We can only hope for a repeat performance of last week come this weekend.’
    • ‘The grotto guide is a brilliantly jaded girl whose patience is obviously waning come November.’
    • ‘She would enjoy his young years and try to gave him a base foundation to work with come his adolescent years.’
    • ‘It should be interesting come qualifying Saturday and hopefully in the race.’
    • ‘Imagine slipping this on come boxing day when the family comes around?’

noun

mass nouninformal
  • Semen ejaculated at an orgasm.

Usage

The use of come followed by and, as in come and see for yourself, dates back to Old English, but is seen by some as incorrect or only suitable for informal English: for more details see and

Phrases

  • as — as they come

    • Used to describe someone or something that is a supreme example of the quality specified.

      ‘Smith is as tough as they come’
      • ‘He's everything a football player should be - he's as tough as they come.’
      • ‘‘We always knew it would be tough, but this is as tough as they come,’ he said.’
      • ‘These lessons, these stories, are as essential as they come.’
      • ‘To give a little background, the Aunt - while a wonderful woman - is as nosy and as pushy as they come.’
      • ‘It's difficult not to be impressed by this outrageous concrete hyperbole, but he is as right-on as they come and says he despises it as a symbol of tyranny.’
      • ‘But then one of friends is about as fey as they come.’
      • ‘She had everything going for her - Olympic glory, good looks, personality, and as articulate as they come.’
      • ‘He's as big as they come, both literally and figuratively.’
      • ‘He is as versatile as they come and he has so many quality strings to his bow that he is well tuned up in every aspect of the game.’
      • ‘He is as tough as they come and never gives and inch.’
  • come again?

    • informal Used to ask someone to repeat or explain something they have said.

      ‘‘It's a bit like Sherlock Holmes's dog.’ ‘Come again?’’
      ‘Madge looked blankly at her. ‘Come again?’’
  • come and go

    • 1Arrive and then depart again; move around freely.

      ‘he continued to come and go as he pleased’
      • ‘We're only realizing it now, just how long it's been and all the groups that have come and gone since we've been in this.’
      • ‘We did not know when we can come and go freely.’
      • ‘We need to have doors in our walls with guards at the doors, but let's let people come and go freely.’
      • ‘Others have come and gone, some even had a spell, maybe even a season or two in the sun, but few truly prospered long-term.’
      • ‘Dolly has come and gone, but the implications of her design have begun a new chapter in life, ethics and possibilities.’
      • ‘There were no extra guards at the gates, and anyone can come and go freely.’
      • ‘The great flood of January 4th has come and gone, and all the excitement over it has dwindled.’
      • ‘I grew up in God's country, east Tennessee, and I have always come and gone as I please.’
      • ‘Some have even returned to the fray for second helpings, while journeymen pros have come and gone like travelling salesmen.’
      • ‘Some people are, however, going to be disappointed to learn that his chance at a Booker has already come and gone.’
      1. 1.1Exist or be present for a limited time; be transitory.
        ‘kings and queens may come and go, but the Crown goes on forever’
        • ‘Like the yo-yo, the hula hoop, and the Mohican haircut, vehicle fads come and go.’
        • ‘In my years of experience, I have seen many language and programming fads come and go.’
        • ‘Novelty events come and go and are of limited appeal but a good musical act covers a multitude and keeps the crowd happy.’
        • ‘Looking at all those illustrations, one can learn first hand about how fashions come and go in repeated cycles.’
        • ‘This is so because political parties come and go, but the nation remains.’
        • ‘Booms may come and go, but the analysis of the data must go on forever.’
        • ‘Organic food is a middle-class fad that can come and go according to sentiment.’
        • ‘You can't force a style on people, and trends and fads come and go at different intervals.’
        • ‘Artists come and go, gaining notoriety and popularity before heading off into distant horizons.’
        • ‘Directors rise and fall, fads come and go, but cinema is just as exciting as it's always been.’
  • come from behind

    • Win after lagging.

      • ‘They continued their good start to the campaign by coming from behind to beat Buxton 2-1.’
      • ‘This team is pretty good at coming from behind and staying tough.’
      • ‘At Sandown yesterday, his performance in coming from behind to destroy a field of handicappers even had the bookmakers raving.’
      • ‘The aspect of that win which was most pleasing was they won coming from behind, the converse of some earlier games.’
      • ‘Westport United showed admirable resilience and courage in coming from behind twice to book a place in the last four of the League Cup.’
      • ‘They were fitter and sharper and deserve enormous credit in coming from behind not just once, but twice.’
      • ‘They are limping their way towards the play-offs after coming from behind twice in two games.’
      • ‘Naturally enough, they were rooting for the guy coming from behind because they wanted an exciting finish.’
      • ‘Great credit must go to the latter for coming from behind to force the late draw.’
      • ‘She won easily after coming from behind.’
  • come off it

    • informal in imperativeSaid when vigorously expressing disbelief.

      ‘‘Come off it, he'll know that's a lie.’’
      • ‘My honest (and admittedly, somewhat cruel) reaction is ‘Oh, come off it, you're not that special.’’
      • ‘Well, I say hooray for the older man, too, but come off it.’
      • ‘Come off it, that's not something ‘worth remembering’.’
      • ‘Indeed, she claims that there is an unspoken English rule that she calls ‘the importance of not being earnest’, along with a peculiarly English injunction to say, ‘Oh, come off it!’’
      • ‘‘Oh, come off it,’ I said, when they started raving.’
      • ‘Oh, come off it, it's true that they can be justly blamed for all sorts of devilish chicanery, but your presumption is crazy.’
      • ‘‘Oh come off it, mate,’ he said, because he is not only a hawk, but has a keen and impatient mind.’
      • ‘So everything I do, there's this little bit of me that's saying, Hey, come off it, you can't do this.’
      • ‘I can accept there would be a little disappointment associated with a camp designed for children's activities being cancelled but come off it, surely the child could make do with either the swimming pool or the beach.’
      • ‘OK, there are bound to be borderlines for teenagers - but come off it.’
  • come right

    • informal Have a good outcome; end well.

      ‘don't worry—I'm sure it'll come right’
      • ‘The danger would be getting too concerned about the way we are playing because I am sure it will come right.’
      • ‘We just have to be patient so everything comes right.’
      • ‘The political importance of the Dome is such that we can expect major government efforts to ensure the presentation comes right.’
      • ‘He was killed just as his life was about to come right.’
      • ‘At times like that you have just got to dig deep and hopefully things will come right on Saturday.’
      • ‘I'd hate to see them go but they aren't right and will never come right.’
      • ‘As it happens, everything comes right in the end.’
      • ‘It adds to the growing body of evidence that at last things are starting to come right for it.’
      • ‘A 90% mark in his prelim allowed him some room for confidence that things would come right.’
      • ‘Plus there was a naïve hope that things would come right in the end - as they did.’
  • come the —

    • informal Play the part of; behave like.

      ‘don't come the innocent with me’
  • come to nothing

    • Have no significant or successful result in the end.

      ‘he is convinced talk of a leadership challenge will come to nothing’
      • ‘As a result, ‘it becomes sentimentalism and comes to nothing.’’
      • ‘But this came to nothing and it fell to the French to pioneer international sport in keeping with their long diplomatic traditions.’
      • ‘Confidence was now high but a succession of further chances came to nothing.’
      • ‘In fact, even if the writing comes to nothing, and nothing much happens for the rest of my life, I'm happy that I've changed from the person I was.’
      • ‘But, overall, it was vacuous stuff, came to nothing, and fizzled out.’
      • ‘I'd hate to see all the work he's done coming to nothing just because of the generally idiotic circumstances that prevail around here when anyone tries to stick their neck out and do something original.’
      • ‘But constant failure to agree on anything meant all of this came to nothing, and now these opportunities have been lost.’
      • ‘As a result another good idea came to nothing and another report ended up gathering dust in some warehouse.’
      • ‘That the speculation came to nothing is a result of different aspects of a goalkeeper's skill-set being of interest to different managers.’
      • ‘As he talks, the grey-haired retired policeman holds his head in his hands out of sheer frustration that his views have still come to nothing.’
      fail, meet with failure, meet with disaster, miscarry, go wrong, go awry, fall through, fall flat, be frustrated, break down, collapse, founder, fold, come to nothing, come to naught
      View synonyms
  • come to pass

    • literary Happen; occur.

      ‘it came to pass that she had two sons’
      • ‘He suggested that it was likely I was going get an interview, and indeed that did come to pass.’
      • ‘And so it has come to pass, but in a rather different way than she predicted.’
      • ‘The party's boasts during the last parliament that it had replaced the Conservatives as the main opposition did not come to pass.’
      • ‘And there is an acknowledgement that the truly big occasions must be savoured to the full lest they never come to pass again.’
      • ‘And that's exactly what's come to pass - they won the war, then they seemed to be at a total loss as to what to do next.’
      • ‘As if to allow their predictions to come true, the international community has presided over the coming to pass of a deteriorating socio-economic climate for young people.’
      • ‘That's a pretty hopeful view; it would be nice to see it come to pass, if only partially.’
      • ‘As it is still being run by a management team, not all of these things have come to pass although they they probably will when a new franchisee has been found.’
      • ‘And tell him to take this opportunity to make sure that doesn't come to pass.’
      • ‘But if such a ban did indeed come to pass, would that make the system stable?’
      happen, come about, occur, transpire, arise
      View synonyms
  • come to that (or if it comes to that)

    • informal In fact (said to introduce an additional point)

      ‘there isn't a clock on the mantelpiece—come to that, there isn't a mantelpiece!’
      • ‘I thought people would never stop carping about the green light business, or the parking come to that.’
      • ‘It isn't that I don't like drugs, or his work come to that, it's that they don't agree with me.’
      • ‘Actually, come to that - when did you last see a Top of the Pops dressing room?’
      • ‘In fact come to that there wasn't a car park as such either, more of a development site with vehicles strewn about across it.’
      • ‘And come to that how many people can get any of the fancy new digital channels - of the BBC or anyone else?’
      • ‘Well, the grannies and, come to that, the great grannies that I know are otherwise engaged.’
      • ‘Nor, if it comes to that, is there any justification in the way that executives awarded themselves multi-million bonuses while axing 170 rural branches.’
      • ‘He now exposes the grandiose follies of Oxford University itself, and a few other universities as well, come to that.’
      • ‘But nobody should have their past held against them - or their future, come to that.’
      • ‘It's dead easy to make with spinach beet, or real spinach come to that.’
  • come to think of it

    • On reflection (said when an idea or point occurs to one while one is speaking)

      ‘come to think of it, that was very daring of you’
      • ‘He came on Wednesday, which come to think of it, wasn't that much of a surprise, given that he was due last Saturday.’
      • ‘And come to think of it, he's one of the few singers around today that will still have a career in ten years time!’
      • ‘He would make an ideal jumping supremo, come to think of it.’
      • ‘In fact I went through most of my fly box come to think of it.’
      • ‘So I am a bit unsure if I like the movie come to think of it.’
      • ‘And, come to think of it, I am unable to spend the day laying a new patio.’
      • ‘And, come to think of it, the window frames look pretty ropey as well.’
      • ‘And come to think of it most of the victims I have seen being carried home as trophies by cats have been birds, dormice and voles.’
      • ‘Very graceful it was too, like a blue bird of prey but without feathers or wings or talons or any other bird features, come to think of it.’
      • ‘I'm not sure that reading his diary is such a great idea after all, come to think of it.’
  • come what may

    • No matter what happens.

      ‘they're going to make the change, come what may’
      • ‘Claims that he was determined to call a referendum this Parliament, come what may and regardless of the five tests, were wrong, he told them.’
      • ‘Don't enter training without intending to complete it, come what may (barring only the most extreme circumstances).’
      • ‘When I started practising trance music, the main intention was to make people dance, come what may.’
      • ‘She is busy trying to find the basic cost of £600 to pay for the trip to Germany but is determined to get there come what may as she takes a big step towards her dream of playing in next year's world championships.’
      • ‘All this meant they did not have all their eggs in one basket, so when one section was doing badly, another would perhaps be all right and so, by dint of thrift and hard work, they managed to make a living, come what may.’
      • ‘In other words, the rich countries have perfected a well-established state intervention programme to ensure that their farmers get a minimum level of income, come what may.’
      • ‘Nevertheless a piece was required every day, come what may.’
      • ‘A recent torn hamstring followed by a dispute with her coach could mean she doesn't even start the opening 100m hurdles on Saturday despite her protestations that she will be lining up come what may.’
      • ‘It's the arrogance that galls - an arrogance that she can afford to entertain because, come what may, the invitations to share what pass for her thoughts will never be withdrawn.’
      • ‘The members were obviously rattled at the presence of residents and it was apparent that this proposal will happen come what may with no regard to local residents.’
      in spite of everything, in spite of that, nonetheless, even so, however, but, still, yet, though, be that as it may, for all that, despite everything, despite that, after everything, having said that, that said, just the same, all the same, at the same time, in any event, come what may, at any rate, notwithstanding, regardless, anyway, anyhow
      View synonyms
  • have it coming (to one)

    • informal Be due for retribution on account of something bad that one has done.

      ‘his uppity sister-in-law had it coming to her’
      • ‘He did not look around, for he knew he'd have it coming to him.’
      • ‘Really, the subliminal message here is that this woman had it coming to her.’
      • ‘Yet it is too simplistic to suggest that these raiders had it coming to them.’
      • ‘The dialogue reinforces the mob suggestions: ‘There's nothing I can do, he's had it coming to him,’ says a barman.’
      • ‘And anyway, if you really did it, I'm quite sure they had it coming to them.’
      • ‘I stole a lot when I was younger, so I definitely had it coming to me.’
      • ‘But hell, it's not like the other guy didn't have it coming to him, being on the other team and all.’
      • ‘‘I suppose I had it coming to me, though,’ he added.’
      • ‘The international community, on the other hand, will say that they had it coming to them.’
      • ‘They had it coming to them, but does one wrong ever justify another?’
  • how come?

    • informal Said when asking how or why something happened or is the case.

      ‘how come you never married, Jimmy?’
      • ‘She frowned at me, looking disappointed, and he raised a curious eyebrow, asking, silently, ‘how come?’’
      • ‘He rubbed his palms together ‘Could you explain to us how come?’’
      • ‘Long-lost customers show up saying ‘Wow, heard you were closing, how come?’’
      • ‘He smiled faintly at Michael, ‘I don't mean to sound pressuring or anything, but how come?’’
      • ‘I told him, ‘If we are not China and we are not Taiwan, then how come?’’
      • ‘He said nonsensical things like, ‘You're so many colors all over, how come?’’
  • to come

    • (following a noun) in the future.

      ‘films that would inspire generations to come’
      ‘in years to come’
      • ‘Over the weeks and months to come, we will no doubt find out more about why they died.’
      • ‘He is a great player to play off so I'm just hoping its the start of many more goals to come.’
      • ‘In years to come it will probably seem amazing that we lived our lives any other way.’
      • ‘I think we may well find ourselves walking out that way quite a lot in the months to come.’
      • ‘Everybody turned up for a meeting to chat about the summer just past and the one to come.’
      • ‘Otherwise, it may be evidence that this is a bad deal and there is more trouble to come.’
      • ‘We have a team of fine young players, who it is hoped can progress in seasons to come.’
      • ‘He said the gangland murder could be one of the cases that police turn back to in years to come.’
      • ‘It was a great way to spend a summer afternoon and there is still much more to come.’
      • ‘Schools reflect what is in society as a whole and they help shape the society to come.’
  • when it comes to —

    • When the specified matter is under consideration.

      ‘it pays to be proactive when it comes to your health’
      • ‘What's your best advice to others in your position when it comes to building the proper security program?’
      • ‘Edwards is hesitant when it comes to product innovation.’
      • ‘The department has long been a leader when it comes to energy innovation in the public sector.’
      • ‘What people need is accurate information about the things that really make a difference when it comes to looking after themselves.’
      • ‘He's still the administration's best salesman when it comes to dealing with the economic recovery.’
      • ‘Some of the smallest cars on the road carry some of the biggest risks when it comes to keeping you safe in a crash.’
      • ‘Obviously, he handled a lot of big items when it comes to the recession.’
  • where someone is coming from

    • informal Someone's meaning, motivation, or personality.

      ‘George doesn't know me, he doesn't know where I'm coming from’
      • ‘You've got to understand where he is coming from.’
      • ‘While I understand where he is coming from, I think his post actually betrays a misguided set of moral priorities across the entire political landscape.’
      • ‘A handful of Latino-accented films on screens recently show a decidedly mixed picture of where Hollywood is coming from and where it thinks it's going.’
      • ‘I understand exactly where he is coming from.’
      • ‘I can readily identify with where the Judge is coming from, because with solicitors being directly involved on the day in different cases that are listed in both courts the inevitability is that problems will arise.’
      • ‘I know exactly where he is coming from - there's no time to pander to people's emotions.’
      • ‘And as a result, I don't think the electorate understands where it is coming from,’ he says.’
      • ‘So if you really want to argue with that, please, pick up the book - it's a good, quick read, and at least you'll know where Johnson is coming from.’
      • ‘It is becoming increasingly difficult to work out where she is coming from.’
      • ‘Well, I can understand where he is coming from.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • come about

    • 1Happen; take place.

      ‘the relative speed with which emancipation came about’
      • ‘The delay came about because the tunnel had come up short of a screen of trees, slowing the flow of escaping airmen.’
      • ‘This fallacy came about because of English painters during the Victorian era.’
      • ‘This came about as the direct result of a fatality that happened here in the early 80s.’
      • ‘The interest in marine biology came about when he was in college working in the steel mills.’
      • ‘But what are the odds of life coming about by sheer chance?’
      • ‘He, however, sees regime change coming about through somewhat more direct means.’
      • ‘The amendment, which extends the recall statute to 10 years, comes about in response to a Congressional proposal.’
      • ‘This additional post came about due to the refitting of the Lincoln store.’
      • ‘Most of these shipwrecks came about by collision, by storm, or by bad navigation.’
      • ‘Yet belief also comes about through direct experience.’
      happen, occur, take place, transpire, fall, present itself, crop up, materialize, arise, arrive, appear, surface, ensue, follow
      View synonyms
    • 2(of a ship) change direction.

      • ‘I came about and headed for home but my little boat didn't beat into the wind very well.’
      • ‘Signaling with one long shrill of his whistle followed by one short blast, he waits for an echo from the harbormaster, then comes about and eases his boat against the wharf of a two-story shed.’
      • ‘Lisan just sat there in her floating command chair, her focus was not upon the exploding ships but at the war cruisers that were slowly coming about and from the looks of it, they weren't planning on a retreat any time soon.’
      • ‘As the Lexington heeled over and started to come about and face the tanker fleet.’
      • ‘Starboard oars pushing and port oars pulling, she came about rapidly and chased after the Isis.’
      • ‘As we came about, I heard a grinding noise and watched the mast lean over and fall into the water.’
      • ‘The command ship, designated as the Chasing Death, drove forward into the nearest enemy destroyers, who were coming about to meet them, along with the heavy cruiser.’
      • ‘Five days more they sailed, eventually coming about to face northwest.’
      change course, change direction, change heading
      View synonyms
  • come across

    • 1Meet or find by chance.

      ‘I came across these old photos recently’
      • ‘While he was tidying up his desk one day, he came across a promotional leaflet about a broadband connection provider.’
      • ‘Just in case I never come across it by chance, I sowed some seed last spring, since it is a garden plant.’
      • ‘I have ‘met’ or come across people who care about where they live, are moved by what goes on near and far.’
      • ‘They are deep below the ground and, unless you knew where to find them you'd probably never come across them by chance as the entrance is just a small door on the side of the road.’
      • ‘In your practice till now have you ever come across with so many controversies like the ones you have come across in Bulgaria?’
      • ‘Most places we visited did provide high-chairs, though, and coming across a grumpy, unhelpful Kiwi is more of a rarity than spotting an example of the national bird species of the same name.’
      • ‘Even though the book is a popular one, chances of school children coming across it are minimal.’
      • ‘Sometimes acquaintances tip him off about such books and at other times he comes across them by chance.’
      • ‘He was probably the only of the teens she had come across with a typically pleasant demeanor, and she tended to find it rather refreshing.’
      • ‘Thankfully, I came across a web site which provided some insight and presented a different solution to my dilemma.’
      reach, arrive at, meet, get to, get up to, get as far as, make, make it to, set foot on, gain, attain
      find by chance, meet by chance, meet up with, run into, run across, come upon, chance on, stumble on, happen on, light on, hit on
      View synonyms
    • 2Hand over or provide what is wanted.

      ‘she has come across with some details’
      • ‘So if they thought she'd come across with some blockbuster testimony, they'd put her up there.’
      • ‘Whether we come across with little or much, the mere gesture can be a spiritually lightening experience.’
      hand over, give, deliver, produce, part with, pay up
      View synonyms
      1. 2.1(of a woman) agree to have sexual intercourse with a man.
        • ‘I had a date at eight with Holly, but she wasn't ready to come across yet.’
  • come along

    • 1Arrive.

      ‘a chance like this doesn't come along every day’
      arrive, reach, come, make it, turn up, appear, put in an appearance, make an appearance, come on the scene, come up, approach, enter, present oneself, be along, come along, materialize
      View synonyms
    • 2in imperativeSaid when encouraging someone or telling them to hurry up.

      ‘That's our man, Watson! Come along!’
      hurry, hurry up, hurry it up, be quick, be quick about it, get a move on, come on, look lively, speed up, move faster
      View synonyms
  • come amid

    • (of an action or event) be accompanied by; happen at the same time as.

      ‘the cuts come amid increasing competition in Hong Kong’
      • ‘Today's announcement comes amid a dismal earnings report.’
      • ‘The suicide attack at the army's headquarters came amid efforts to try to put the peace process back on track.’
      • ‘The previously undisclosed problems come amid estimates of growing hunger in the isolated communist country.’
      • ‘The announcement, made by e-commerce Minister Douglas Alexander, came amid concerns about the effects of emissions on public health.’
      • ‘The number of youngsters spending high amounts of time in nurseries comes amid growing controversy over the impact of full-time child care on development.’
      • ‘The aggressive head-hunter approach comes amid a competitive market for school administrators.’
      • ‘The comments come amid widespread concern about knife crime.’
      • ‘The failed operation with the Jordanian agent comes amid new criticism about the quality of American intelligence collection in Afghanistan.’
      • ‘The budget on Thursday will come amid a week of reminders of the nation's fiscal plight.’
      • ‘Sir Ian's criticism of targets comes amid signs of a growing rebellion over red tape among senior officers.’
  • come at

    • Launch oneself at (someone) to attack them.

      ‘he shot an officer who came at him from behind’
      • ‘It seems the only way to stop someone coming at you to do your harm is to carry weapons of your own and never mind the stupid laws that don't do any good.’
      • ‘I found him coming at me, and I decided to show him the outside.’
      • ‘You can even lift opponents in the air, swing them around and then come at them in a vertical attack.’
      • ‘Armed police called to a York restaurant had to fire baton rounds at a man coming at them with a carving knife.’
      • ‘That's where they controlled the game and they'd just keep coming at you.’
      • ‘One theory is that a fly cannot cope with two threats at once, so coming at it with two hands, from opposite sides, often catches it out.’
      • ‘The only future I can see is the drunks coming at you at all times of the day and night.’
      • ‘But he looked up, saw a couple of lumbering behemoths coming at him and calmly danced past them.’
      • ‘Whatever, it's coming at us every day, on programme after programme, bulletin after bulletin.’
      • ‘He could see him coming at him in his sleep for weeks after.’
  • come away

    • Be left with a specified feeling, impression, or result after doing something.

      ‘she came away feeling upset’
      • ‘The Gazette is also sure that such an observer would come away with the impression that some sort of solution is needed.’
      • ‘And I came away with the distinct impression that the Mozart Effect does not exist.’
      • ‘All the guys that have flown the aeroplane come away with the same impression.’
      • ‘But in the end the viewer comes away with more sensory impressions - visual, auditory and otherwise - than any clear moral messages.’
      • ‘It was an amazing experience, and I came away with impressions that will be with me always.’
      • ‘This will be a tough grand prix, but we'll do our best to come away with another positive result for the team.’
      • ‘We are going there to get a result but we will really have to dig deep to come away from there with a victory.’
      • ‘The reality is that Dubrovnik is a little bit of everything, and each visitor comes away with a different impression and experience.’
      • ‘The other impression I have come away with is that the Dutch are generally physically imposing.’
      • ‘At the end of the launch, I came away with highly favourable impressions of the car.’
  • come back

    • 1(in sport) recover from a deficit.

      ‘the Mets came back from a 3–0 deficit’
      • ‘It was an incredible turn of events to concede a goal after a couple of minutes and then come back in that way.’
      • ‘However, Coventry came back with a try from their centre.’
      • ‘We lost our way last Saturday and allowed Kendal to come back from a goal down to beat us.’
    • 2Reply or respond to someone, especially vigorously.

      ‘he came back at Judy with a vengeance’
      • ‘There can have been little cheer as he came back at them like a pack of Jack Russells.’
      • ‘Chelsea had a good period early in the second half, but we weathered that and came back at them.’
      • ‘We took control early on but they came back at us, and we could have let them.’
      • ‘Park came back at Albion and took the lead through a well taken converted try.’
      answer, respond
      respond, answer, say in response, rejoin, return
      View synonyms
  • come before

    • Be dealt with by (a judge or court)

      ‘it is the most controversial issue to come before the Supreme Court’
      • ‘It is not the case, with respect to my learned friend, that this is the first time this issue has come before the court.’
      • ‘I appealed to the Federal Court of Australia and my matter came before a single judge of that court.’
      • ‘I think the issue will come before the Supreme Court again in the next couple of years.’
      • ‘It seems to me unfortunate that cases are coming before the courts regularly now which deal with these issues where the parties are still not aware of the approach taken by the Court of Appeal.’
      • ‘The application for possession then comes before the County Court.’
      • ‘We must therefore always be aware of the substantive issues that come before the Court.’
      • ‘That could happen in almost every case in which a trial is dealt with at first instance and comes before a court of appeal.’
      • ‘Preparations are forging ahead for a judicial review, which will come before a High Court judge in Swansea.’
      • ‘I have already said that the matter first came before a District Judge.’
      • ‘When the assessment came before the Judge the claim was under four heads of damage.’
  • come between

    • Interfere with or disturb the relationship of (two people)

      ‘I let my stupid pride come between us’
      • ‘A couple in a relationship can expect any number of barriers to come between them.’
      • ‘All this time the ex was aware of the connection we had made and was intent on coming between us.’
      • ‘It is always stressful when something comes between you and the person you love.’
      • ‘Nothing must be allowed to interfere with this work - nothing must come between them and their giving themselves utterly to it.’
      • ‘This relationship was unrealistic, and doomed from the outset, came between Wilde and his art, and became his ruination.’
      • ‘This film is all about ego clashes that couples usually have and how pride often comes between two people.’
      • ‘We talked about the usual things, but there was something coming between us.’
      • ‘It is a sentimentally realistic account of a woman's coming between a man and his life-work.’
      • ‘Tragically it's beyond them to understand the instinct that will make even a domestic hen attack anyone coming between her and her chicks.’
      • ‘Almost nothing comes between me and my cricket.’
      alienate, estrange, separate, divide, split up, break up, disunite, disaffect, pit against one another, set against one another, cause disagreement between, sow dissension between, set at odds, set at variance
      View synonyms
  • come by

    • 1Call casually and briefly as a visitor.

      ‘his friends came by’
      ‘she came by the house’
      • ‘So, I mean, the last time I saw her was in October when she came by the house and appeared to be pregnant.’
      • ‘Meantime, neighbors, friends and supporters came by the house to drop notes and flowers.’
      • ‘This one time my friends were all coming by and they were partying, and there were all these rollerbladers at the park.’
      • ‘A friend from church comes by each Friday morning and takes me.’
      • ‘A young priest and family friend, Patrick, came by regularly to offer John and his family spiritual and moral support.’
      • ‘What if one of my kid's friends comes by without an appointment?’
      • ‘We have lots of family and friends coming by; my brother and I stayed at my Mum's house for much of that time.’
      • ‘Planning for the wedding was dull for the first hour, and then family members and friends came by.’
      • ‘He said, ‘I'll hang around here until my friend comes by.’’
      • ‘So when you feel hot, you take a shower and when a friend comes by to visit, you wrap a towel around your waist and watch TV with them.’
    • 2Manage to acquire or obtain (something)

      ‘the remoteness of the region makes accurate information hard to come by’
      • ‘He had been playing the flute for some time when he realized that high quality flute repairmen were hard to come by.’
      • ‘Apprenticeships were hard to come by and for most of his classmates the only work available was in England.’
      • ‘The sides were well matched and with good defending and sharp goal keepers on both sides scores were hard to come by.’
      • ‘Not only are some of these operating as local businesses, they are also bringing jobs and wealth to areas that find both hard to come by.’
      • ‘She took some art materials for the children, knowing that they are hard to come by in the detention centres.’
      • ‘Fairytales are hard to come by, especially in New York these days, but the gift of hope brings a magic of its own.’
      • ‘Apparently good knife-grade steel was hard to come by, and I had some of the best.’
      • ‘There's a gripping tension to it that's hard to come by in comics designed to be all-ages entertainment.’
      • ‘The precise details of such disputes usually are hard to come by.’
      • ‘Bear in mind that good managers are hard to come by.’
      obtain, acquire, gain, get, find, pick up, lay hold of, possess oneself of, come to have, procure, secure, get possession of
      View synonyms
  • come down

    • 1(of a building or other structure) collapse or be demolished.

      ‘we were lucky the bridge didn't come down’
      ‘the whole ceiling had to come down’
      • ‘Nearly 20 trees came down in a single building operation.’
      • ‘The old Victorian buildings have since come down amid plans for a business park which would create 1,200 office jobs, and a new sports centre.’
      • ‘They succeeded in knocking a hole in one wall, but still the building wouldn't come down.’
      • ‘The police department knew that the buildings were coming down.’
      • ‘When the collapse started, the building came down so incredibly fast that none of them had a chance to react.’
      • ‘There are still a few old industrial buildings to come down, but eventually the area will be a blend of residential and recreational facilities.’
      • ‘One survivor said the building came down in the blink of an eye.’
      • ‘Never in my wildest imagination did I think these buildings were going to come down.’
      • ‘And the fact that one brick or two bricks are unconstitutional doesn't mean the entire structure ought to come down.’
      • ‘It happened this morning, and now officials are worried more of that building could come down.’
      1. 1.1(of an aircraft) crash or crash-land.
        ‘the aircraft came down during an attempt to land in bad weather’
        • ‘He is firstly seeking details of an aircraft which came down near his house.’
        • ‘For example, when a helicopter comes down the whole descent and eventual crash is depicted in intricate detail.’
        • ‘The two escaped with minor injuries when the aircraft came down in County Meath.’
        • ‘It was great fun watching people go grey as they heard how unlikely it was for anybody to survive should their aircraft come down at six hundred miles an hour into a mountain range.’
        • ‘They saw some actual video from toll plaza cameras that recorded the aircraft coming down.’
        • ‘A local recently told the Heritage Trust that she saw the aircraft come down in the sea, and later saw the pilot sitting on the wing waiting to be rescued.’
        • ‘He used his cell phone to call his father who was the local sheriff and his father told him to follow the aircraft and report where it came down.’
        • ‘The remotely piloted aircraft came down in the ocean, within the confines of the test range, west of the facility.’
        • ‘He died after the aircraft in which he was travelling came down in the south of the country.’
        • ‘I mean, there is no doubt that those two planes came down because they crashed into each other.’
        drop, drop down, plummet, descend, come down, go down, plunge, sink, dive, nosedive, tumble, pitch
        View synonyms
    • 2Be handed down by tradition or inheritance.

      ‘the name has come down from the last century’
    • 3Reach a decision or recommendation in favour of one side or another.

      ‘advisers and inspectors came down on our side’
      • ‘But I have a really bad feeling that these people tend to err on whichever side comes down in their favor.’
      • ‘On 28 May, after three days of discussions, the British cabinet finally came down against Halifax.’
      • ‘The prison review group came down against needle exchanges because of an ‘unacceptable’ risk to prison officers.’
      • ‘In our submission, that is not obvious from a reading of the various decisions of the High Court which have come down in favour of not disturbing such verdicts.’
      • ‘I have come down in favour of passing the bill, and I have advised the Progressives to come down in favour of passing it.’
      • ‘This exercise could no doubt produce different answers but, for my own part, I come down decisively on the side of the plaintiff.’
      • ‘I thought long and hard about putting photos in this blog, and eventually came down against it as a general working principle.’
      • ‘I was very much of the opinion that it was definitional, but I did side with Jean in the second half of the debate where I came down against skulking.’
      • ‘However, he comes down in favour of the company on this key issue.’
      • ‘He comes down in favour of a voluntary system in which family members can choose whether or not to pool part or all of their incomes for tax purposes, and he list various ways in which this might be done in practice.’
      decide, conclude, settle, reach a decision
      View synonyms
    • 4Leave a university, especially Oxford or Cambridge, after finishing one's studies.

      ‘Jarvis came down from Cambridge with a degree in engineering’
      • ‘I married Ann when we came down from Cambridge in 1960, and we had a three-week honeymoon in Sicily.’
    • 5Experience the lessening of an excited or euphoric feeling, especially one produced by a narcotic drug.

      ‘I felt like a raver who has just come down from an ecstasy tablet’
      • ‘This film's characters don't develop and, in a crystal meth haze, they never quite come down from their high.’
      • ‘New pillowtop mattresses, fleece blankets and moldable pillows await after you come down from your caffeine high.’
      • ‘We were later explained that this woman was probably coming down from taking drugs the night before and was experiencing excruciating pain in the process.’
      • ‘The drug had worn off and I could feel myself coming down.’
      • ‘No one has gotten closer to the beauty and loneliness of the drug culture, where everything, finally, is about coming down.’
      • ‘All in all, the night was nearly impossible to come down from.’
      • ‘I heard tell that the smoothies may or may not be marketed as aids to coming down off of various illicit drugs.’
      • ‘Has the country come down from its collective trip down memory lane after last weekend's outdoor hockey extravaganza in Edmonton?’
  • come down on

    • Criticize or punish (someone) harshly.

      ‘she came down on me like a ton of bricks’
      • ‘It was not a case of us coming down on them because they weren't performing or any other issues.’
      • ‘It seems I have upset one of the more remote of my readers when I came down a wee bit heavily on divers using hard drugs.’
      • ‘The first time I heard of you guys, it was in an article about the police coming down on one of your shows.’
      • ‘I have never done ANYTHING wrong to these people, and yet they are coming down on me without reason.’
      • ‘And the taxation system favours big business while coming down on the small businessman.’
      • ‘One kind of crime the former drugs squad officer is determined to come down on heavily, he warned, is the pushing of illegal drugs.’
      • ‘I did come down pretty hard on her illegal drug use, so I can evaluate her response to that in order to gauge the rest.’
      • ‘Consequently, the reaction - coming down on her like a ton of bricks - should be seen to express how society at large views racism.’
      • ‘It is hard to keep coming down on them in a town where there is nothing for them to do.’
      • ‘It'd be good to see referees coming down on this like a ton of bricks.’
      reprimand, rebuke, reproach, scold, admonish, reprove, remonstrate with, chastise, chide, upbraid, berate, take to task, pull up, castigate, lambaste, read someone the riot act, give someone a piece of one's mind, haul over the coals, criticize, censure
      View synonyms
  • come down to

    • (of a situation or outcome) be dependent on (a specified factor)

      ‘it came down to her word against Guy's’
      • ‘I had enough money in the bank to buy gas, food, and perhaps rent a dog sled if it came down to that.’
      • ‘In my view the outcome will come down to who wants the victory most, and I feel we do.’
      • ‘If one listens to those in the industry, it comes down to who is getting the grants, and for what.’
      • ‘It amazes me how some people can be so selfish, and that's what it all comes down to.’
      • ‘I guess a lot of it comes down to what you really expected to see when you entered the theater.’
      • ‘But effectively it's coming down to where the teacher meets his or her student in the classroom.’
      • ‘I think that it really comes down to what trousers you were wearing with the shirt.’
      • ‘We had been told that in the last part of the race it would come down to who wanted it more.’
      • ‘The last federal election came down to literally a handful of votes in some ridings.’
      • ‘Given the soft ground, in the end it will come down to which horse is fittest and wants it most.’
      amount to, add up to, constitute, be tantamount to, approximate to, boil down to, be equivalent to, comprise, count as
      View synonyms
  • come down with

    • Begin to suffer from (a specified illness)

      ‘I came down with influenza’
      • ‘I must be coming down with some rare and dangerous illness.’
      • ‘And there were some pretty serious health problems that he came down with as a result of that.’
      • ‘This comes shortly after hundreds of people came down with a similar illness on a cruise.’
      • ‘In fact, he felt positively weak as though he was coming down with some sort of illness.’
      • ‘And once they're infected, it's usually just a matter of time before the whole family comes down with the same illness.’
      • ‘By Friday night Lucy had come down with a terrible illness that kept her feverishly in bed on Saturday, Sunday and Monday.’
      • ‘Years passed, and one day the farmer came down with a mysterious illness that none of the doctors could cure.’
      • ‘It's the recognition that we all risk some day of coming down with a catastrophic illness or having an accident and it's a risk we want to protect ourselves from.’
      • ‘Imagine the scenario: you are in a foreign country, you do not speak a word of the language and you come down with some mystery illness.’
      • ‘To avoid coming down with the illness, he recommends that elders, the very young, or caregivers receive flu shots.’
      become ill with, become sick with, fall ill with, fall sick with, be taken ill with, show symptoms of, become infected with, get, catch, develop, contract, take, sicken for, fall victim to, be struck down with, be stricken with
      View synonyms
  • come for

    • 1Arrive to arrest or detain (someone)

      ‘the cops came for her husband’
      • ‘Brandon was still recuperating himself at home when the police came for him.’
      • ‘At the age of eight in a Moscow hotel she experienced how the secret service came for her parents.’
      • ‘She felt a slight panic rip at her, and she tried her hardest to play her cards right without him finding up the cops were coming for him.’
      • ‘The alarm had just gone off and several guards where coming for me.’
      • ‘Branded a murderer, the police would come for him and lock him away.’
    • 2Launch oneself at (someone) to attack them.

      ‘he came for me with his fists’
      • ‘And then I realize I'm the guy he's shouting at, because there's no one else out here and he's coming for me.’
      • ‘At one point he was coming for me so I was aware of the situation I was in, but you have to react to it.’
  • come forward

    • Volunteer oneself for a task or post or to give evidence about a crime.

      ‘two witnesses have come forward with information’
      ‘no one would come forward to claim the body’
      • ‘He also praised Mr and Mrs Brown for coming forward to give evidence.’
      • ‘He doesn't want to be telling them one story and then later on when the DNA evidence comes forward, have to tell them something different.’
      • ‘This week she returned to the scene of the crime for the first time to appeal for witnesses to come forward.’
      • ‘So far no witnesses have come forward who claim to have seen people acting suspiciously.’
      • ‘Donations flooded in and over a hundred volunteers came forward to help.’
      • ‘The police are quoted as saying that no-one came forward with evidence or identification.’
      • ‘But the woman never came forward to report a crime and has never been identified.’
      • ‘None of his victims, who were praised for their bravery in coming forward and giving evidence, was in court to hear the verdict.’
      • ‘The present manager is resigning at the end of March and a volunteer has yet to come forward to take over.’
      • ‘He is also appealing for volunteers to come forward to help during the two days.’
      volunteer, step forward, offer one's services, make oneself available
      View synonyms
  • come from

    • 1Originate in; have as its source.

      ‘the word caviar comes from Italian’
      • ‘The origination of these messages should come from a central source close to the top politician.’
      • ‘It may be that there will be ten pieces of information, all coming from completely different sources.’
      • ‘It comes mainly from building materials, oil-based paint, furniture made of compressed wood and personal care products.’
      • ‘There are some excellent voices from Canada and they are coming from unexpected sources.’
      • ‘Their informant was the landlord, and, coming from such a source, the information could not have been discounted.’
      • ‘Inspiration for original writing comes from many different sources.’
      • ‘I think everyone loves to hear how wonderful they are even if it's coming from an unreliable source.’
      • ‘The first is to increase the amount of energy coming from renewable sources like bio - fuels, wind and waves.’
      • ‘This is especially handy when your compilations will be coming from diverse sources.’
      • ‘Much of our source material comes from early versions of these same songs from the first record.’
      originate from, have its origins in, derive from, arise from, stem from, emanate from, proceed from, start from, issue from, evolve from
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Be the result of.
        ‘a dignity that comes from being in control’
        have its origins in, arise from, originate from, spring from, derive from, come from, be rooted in, emanate from, issue from, flow from, proceed from, result from, be consequent on
        View synonyms
      2. 1.2Have as one's place of birth or residence.
        ‘I come from Sheffield’
        • ‘I have never been to Wales even though all my family comes from there.’
        be from, be a native of, have been born in, hail from, originate in, have one's roots in, be …, be … by birth
        View synonyms
      3. 1.3Be descended from.
        ‘she comes from a family of Muslim scholars’
        • ‘I come from a family of three girls, and my dad had always said you can be whatever you want to be.’
        • ‘Besides coming from a political family, she is a lawyer who has fought cases in the Supreme Court of India.’
        • ‘My mother is French, and comes from a family of excellent cooks.’
        • ‘Over the last few days, students coming from well-to-do families are in the news for the wrong reasons.’
        • ‘It is understood she comes from a musical family so we're expecting great things from her on the night.’
        • ‘He comes from a family of five, with two younger twin sisters.’
        • ‘It's been interesting for me, coming from a family who has been in the sport so long.’
        • ‘Angel is a very pretty girl, she's a hard worker and she comes from a richer family than most in this town.’
        • ‘Linda was a bubbly, happy, cheerful girl who came from a big loving family.’
        • ‘A relaxed charmer with an eye for girls, he came from a family of gentlemen amateurs.’
  • come in

    • 1Join or become involved in an enterprise.

      ‘that's where Jack comes in’
      ‘I agreed to come in on the project’
      • ‘I mentioned at the beginning that he is the one commander of a militia force who hasn't come in on this deal.’
      • ‘I've got to get a break and we'll come right back and we'll let Kim respond, and then Dr. Jones and Tony come in on it.’
      • ‘They would have won, had the French not come in on our side.’
      • ‘When I think of other players who I've seen come in on free transfers or for a million pounds or whatever, I'm not certain if they could handle the pressures that I have.’
      • ‘Then they come in on the act and we try to finalise the list of televised matches as early as possible.’
      • ‘Twelve new players have come in on sensible wages and a handsome bonus system.’
      1. 1.1Have a useful role or function.
        ‘this is where grammar comes in’
        • ‘And I think where I come in on that is I've got to trust my president and his cabinet and intelligence and military people.’
        • ‘The said guy will get very upset and this is where my role comes in.’
      2. 1.2with complementProve to have a specified good quality.
        ‘a car comes in handy for day trips from the city’
        • ‘And I tend to remember things, thinking they just might come in useful.’
        • ‘The boy must rid himself of doubt (a quality that might actually come in handy should he ever need to enter a voting booth).’
        • ‘But that does not mean he will not come in useful for his defensive role.’
        • ‘I knew her wisdom would come in useful somewhere.’
        • ‘‘The knowledge and experience I gained is coming in useful as I'm actually working in television,’ he said.’
        • ‘Old washing-up bowls, for example, which will come in useful one day when we do some decorating, despite the fact that the last time I personally picked up a paintbrush was 1994.’
        • ‘Though no revolution in technology, it should come in quite useful.’
        • ‘It's dark down here - the ice above is covered by a layer of snow, blocking out much of the daylight - so the torch comes in useful as David points out various ice formations.’
        • ‘Allow me a repeat post here, so I can prove to you that some idiosyncrasies do come in handy.’
        • ‘And sometimes, those old habits of command come in useful.’
    • 2with complementFinish a race in a specified position.

      ‘the favourite came in first’
      • ‘She came in ninth in her race and did really well against tough competition.’
      • ‘He either wins the race or comes in second place.’
      • ‘I decided to try and come in as high a position as possible, so every few strides became a race against whoever was near to me.’
      • ‘This is raising a lot of questions about whether he can stay in this race if he comes in third.’
      • ‘You don't have control over where you come in a race.’
      • ‘The fifth candidate came in sixth in the race for five seats.’
      • ‘The US were pretty confident of that race and they only came in third.’
      • ‘Last Sunday he became the only driver to record back-to-back top-five finishes by coming in fifth at Dover.’
      • ‘He eventually came in third and received a fantastic reception.’
    • 3(of money) be earned or received regularly.

      ‘there's me and Mum to keep, and no money coming in’
      • ‘We should have money coming in, in another 30 days.’
      • ‘Payments came in regularly until January when no money turned up.’
      • ‘The money is still coming in so we are hoping that the final total will be higher.’
      • ‘Congress is increasingly a battleground on such matters, and elected representatives tend to cave to special interest groups if there is no money coming in on the other side.’
      • ‘The regular cash that came in, each and every month, enabled people to feed themselves and to pay the bills.’
      • ‘It is vital to the club to keep some form of finance coming in on a regular basis and the Club is indebted to all those in the community who have supported the Club in whatever way possible.’
      • ‘We have tried to close the appeal a number of times but more money kept coming in.’
      • ‘So far, we've raised more than £1,000 and the money is still coming in and I'm planning to do it again next year.’
      • ‘For someone running a betting operation, is the volume of money coming in significantly greater than the regular season?’
      • ‘The lab's finances were in serious disarray but money was coming in - projects to put old movies onto DVD and transfer them to in-flight movies were underway.’
    • 4in imperativeBegin speaking or make contact, especially in radio communication.

      ‘come in, London’
    • 5(of a tide) rise; flow.

      ‘the tide was coming in’
      • ‘Some flooding occurred in the Salthill area when the tide was coming in and the only people to be seen walking on the promenade during the day were some photographers.’
      • ‘The tide, coming in, had just caught the corners…’
      • ‘Once the tide starts coming in your time is running out.’
      • ‘He said: ‘The tide was coming in and we had to carry on as waves lapped over our feet.’’
      • ‘When the tide comes in the sea water rises above the little weir to enter the river.’
      • ‘We never found anything valuable, but we nearly got trapped by the tide coming in more than once and arrived home completely wet from having to swim from one rock to another.’
      • ‘‘When it rises, our tides are bigger and come in faster and there is more chance of people getting cut off,’ he warned.’
      • ‘Even then, at the beginnings of the 80s, that tide was coming in.’
      • ‘The tide was coming in and people moved their blankets up the beach, gathered up their belongings and began walking towards the town.’
      • ‘The tide was coming in when the rescue happened.’
  • come in for

    • Receive or be the object of (a reaction), typically a negative one.

      ‘he has come in for a lot of criticism’
      • ‘Despite its academic credentials, it comes in for equally vehement condemnation from the traditionalists.’
      • ‘It's good to see any part of it so nicely commended because it usually comes in for criticism and negative reportage.’
      • ‘The poor old supporters have been coming in for an awful lot of stick over the past few weeks.’
      • ‘He led by example in the middle of the field despite coming in for a lot of physical attention throughout the game.’
      • ‘It comes in for so much criticism, I felt I must write to tell you about my treatment.’
      • ‘After all, it is she who once again seems to be coming in for all the flack.’
      • ‘Care homes in recent years have come in for much negative publicity.’
      • ‘He casts a jaundiced eye on all the major institutions, but none comes in for more criticism than this.’
      • ‘But the bank is coming in for heavy criticism of its handling of the report.’
      • ‘He is now coming in for criticism from colleagues, who assert that his absence is further proof of the leader's casual approach to the job.’
      receive, experience, sustain, undergo, meet with, encounter, face, go through, be subjected to, be the object of, bear the brunt of, suffer, have to put up with, have to bear, have to endure
      View synonyms
  • come into

    • Suddenly receive (money or property), especially by inheriting it.

      ‘he came into an inheritance’
      • ‘In addition, when you do come into a relatively large sum of money, you have to decide what to do with it.’
      • ‘Imagine you've come into a sum of money, such as a bequest or a lottery win.’
      • ‘How he has changed since coming into his inheritance; you would barely know the man.’
      • ‘What about the case of someone who suddenly comes into good fortune, perhaps entirely by his or her own efforts?’
      inherit, be heir to, become heir to, be left, be willed, be bequeathed
      View synonyms
  • come of

    • 1Result from.

      ‘no good will come of it’
      • ‘There was of course also the year that I found out what it was like to get pushed too far by other kids, and what sort of teacher responses came of acting like an intelligent psycho as a result.’
      • ‘And really, not much came of those trials because they were so small and the results weren't all that significant.’
      • ‘Keep this guy as a friend, and if something more comes of that as a result of the friendship, great!’
      • ‘But the only result that comes of such haste is burnout.’
      • ‘Whatever comes of their efforts, we hope that one result will be a simplified, more transparent system that all the stakeholders in the process find easier to understand.’
      • ‘Nothing came of the resultant free-kick.’
      • ‘He takes the resulting corner but nothing comes of it.’
      • ‘In my case they are invariably the result of carelessness and clumsiness, which comes of going to too many meetings and not making enough lemon tarts.’
      1. 1.1Be descended from.
        ‘she came of Dorset stock’
        • ‘He came of an impoverished farming family in the inner Hebrides in Scotland.’
        • ‘His paternal family comes of a long line of priests.’
        • ‘To the surprise of absolutely no one, the results confirmed their earlier conclusion that snakes came of marine ancestry.’
        • ‘He came of London mercantile stock, went to Oxford but socialised too much to take a degree, and married the daughter of Field-Marshall Lord Chetwode.’
        • ‘Chaucer, who came of London merchant stock, grew up in aristocratic and royal circles, and he was one of the most lionized and richly rewarded poets of any age.’
        • ‘They came of gentry stock, and their father exhibited one of the occasional weaknesses of that origin - an incurable optimism in money matters which left him penniless.’
        • ‘Katie comes of a family long associated with Irish music, the most famous of them being her great grand uncle Dame Normanly, of Bellaghy, who was the most famous violinist in all Connacht in his time.’
  • come off

    • 1(of an action) succeed; be accomplished.

      ‘this was a bold experiment which did not come off’
      • ‘Keane never hides on the pitch, and if one effort doesn't come off, he'll always come back for more.’
      • ‘Fowler's flicks do not always come off, but when they do, they inflict damage.’
      • ‘And it always came off well; he was so well respected that they greeted his little flourish with cheers.’
      • ‘The warm reception that he received refuted those who wondered whether the summit would come off, or if it could accomplish anything.’
      • ‘It is as if she is striving for a kind of mythic quality that does not always come off.’
      • ‘It is dangerous and, of course, it doesn't always come off, but this time it did.’
      • ‘No-one minds when things don't always come off and that also helps me have the confidence to do them again.’
      succeed, be successful, be a success, pan out, work, turn out well, work out, go as planned, produce the desired result, get results
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Fare in a specified way in a contest.
        ‘Geoffrey always came off worse in an argument’
        • ‘But she also said that the appellant always seemed to have come off worse.’
        • ‘The hooligans always came off best because they could damage you more than you could damage them.’
        • ‘At a parish council meeting last Monday they said they wanted to remind owners that they are responsible for their animals, who would almost always come off worse in a stand-off with a swan.’
        • ‘There was also a tug of war competition with Trowbridge Rugby Club battling Wiltshire Fire Brigade and coming off the worse.’
        • ‘At any rate, they crudely counterpose that sort of existence to the one led by her lower middle class family, with the latter coming off far worse.’
        • ‘A Japanese film crew also comes off the worse against Bob's wit.’
        • ‘Friends have advised me that, even though I might be a ham-fisted brute, I won't always come off better, and therefore, to curb my enthusiastic vigilanteism.’
        • ‘Dogs going down burrows will often come off the worse for wear too, or may even be killed, as the wombat will crush the dog to the roof of the burrow as a form of self defence.’
        • ‘Upon reflection, I realise that I was indeed very lucky, as I could have come off far worse.’
        • ‘Compare the tale of the noble fighter to the tale of the snake, and see who comes off the worse!’
        end up, finish up
        View synonyms
    • 2Become detached or be detachable from something.

      ‘a wheel came off the tractor’
      • ‘If the wheels can come off something, they probably will.’
      • ‘Trailing at half time it looked as if the wheels were coming off but a brilliant second half display put our title charge back on the rails and from there they never looked back.’
      • ‘I did not realize that a tire had come off the wheel.’
      • ‘The front bogey wheel of the engine came off the tracks requiring staff to jack it back onto the line.’
      • ‘It's astounding how quickly the wheels can come off.’
      • ‘When you're first starting off, believe me, you're wondering if the training wheels are coming off.’
      • ‘The wheels haven't come off, but it looks to me like the wheel nuts are coming off.’
      • ‘Boy, the wheels are really coming off the wagon.’
      • ‘Mr O'Sullivan said the wheels have been coming off the wagon over the past two years.’
      • ‘The slide came, the slope caught them and the wheels came off.’
      1. 2.1Fall from a horse or cycle that one is riding.
        ‘the horse reared up and Harriet came off’
        • ‘The council must have got a lot of complaints because people are always coming off their bikes.’
        • ‘An inquiry was held into the running and riding of the horse after the jockey came off at the ninth fence in the Cantor Sport Beginners' Chase.’
    • 3Stop taking or being addicted to (a drug or form of medication)

      ‘I think I'll come off the pill’
      ‘she works with people coming off heroin’
      • ‘He argued to break the link with hard drugs and for the provision of clean pharmaceutical heroin on prescription to those not yet ready to come off the drug.’
      • ‘By this time his mother was on methadone, trying to come off drugs.’
      • ‘It mimics the effect heroin has on receptors in the brain, reducing the cravings addicts experience when coming off the drug.’
      • ‘It took me going to prison to come off drugs and to realise I needed to sort out my problem.’
      • ‘It can also refer addicts who want to come off drugs to specialist agencies.’
      • ‘If someone who has had epilepsy doesn't have a seizure for two years, their doctor may suggest they come off the medication.’
      • ‘However, if their high blood pressure is based solely on obesity and they can lose the weight, they sometimes can come off of the medications.’
      • ‘She was put on Prozac for the first time during a stay in hospital but came off the drug two years later when her symptoms improved.’
      • ‘Here is the simple key to unlocking a new future for those who want to come off drugs: aftercare.’
      • ‘Would you expect a heroin addict to come off heroin just like that?’
    • 4Have an orgasm.

  • come on

    • 1(of a state or condition) start to arrive or happen.

      ‘she felt a mild case of the sniffles coming on’
      with infinitive ‘it was coming on to rain’
      • ‘If your condition comes on every time you stroke the cat, find it a new home or stop patting the feline.’
      • ‘It probably is coming on, before the summer arrives.’
      • ‘It was a condition that had been coming on for years.’
      • ‘The condition, which came on gradually from the age of ten, also affects Victoria's speech.’
      • ‘But even under those conditions, and the blindness that came on, he continued his scientific work.’
      • ‘Medically, the condition is described as a facial paralysis that comes on suddenly and has no obvious cause (such as an injury).’
      • ‘The condition affects both eyes and comes on very gradually, with little or no symptoms initially.’
      • ‘The condition, which came on gradually from when she was 10, also affects her speech.’
    • 2Meet or find by chance.

      ‘I came on a station that was playing upbeat songs’
      • ‘So the courtiers arranged for the emperor to take a walk in his park, where he ‘chanced’ to come upon a ‘wandering’ giraffe.’
      • ‘Police, calling at a house to trace a former occupant, by chance came upon a case of extreme hardship.’
      • ‘It might be that you know from the literature that there are specific employers or companies attending that you want to meet with, or you might just come upon them by chance as you wander around.’
      • ‘He came upon the channel by chance when he noticed that there was a call-in taking place.’
      • ‘There's also a chance of coming upon a riotous migration party - bands of warblers passing through.’
      • ‘By chance they come upon her in her hide-out.’
      • ‘The building itself was largely destroyed, but by chance I had come upon the entry way into the subway line on my first tour through the city.’
      • ‘I came upon your website by chance and am quite impressed by the content and quality of your coverage.’
      • ‘Does it not mean making preparation to meet the things that come upon us?’
      • ‘I do need to know what things look like in the rare chance that I ever come upon them.’
    • 3in imperativeSaid when encouraging someone to do something or to hurry up or when one feels that someone is wrong or foolish.

      ‘Come on! We must hurry!’
      • ‘Police encouraging her to come on, keep running, keep running to them.’
      • ‘That's why I like you, you will always tell me to come on and hurry up with a review!’
      • ‘So far the response has been very encouraging so come on all you lads who might have been thinking of turning up; there's still plenty of time.’
      • ‘‘Well, come on,’ encouraged Matt, smiling suspiciously as if he knew something the others didn't.’
      • ‘I mean it is not wrong to be calm in a bad situation but come on, show some emotion.’
      • ‘Come on, if any situation was a condition red, this is it.’
      • ‘‘Oh, come on now, time to get up,’ Genevieve encouraged, clapping her hands together.’
      • ‘‘Oh come on; be a man,’ she encouraged mockingly, heading for the door.’
      • ‘We better hurry before the tide comes in, come on love.’
      • ‘But, come on, the snapping mandibles bit's just wrong.’
  • come on to

    • Make sexual advances towards.

      ‘he was a flirt, he came on to everyone’
      • ‘There is a lady at work who is constantly coming on to me.’
      • ‘The three of us worked together and I was worried that I wouldn't survive working with him because it would hurt too much to see him come on to her.’
      • ‘They read poetry and talked until four in the morning, but she didn't think he was interested, because he wasn't coming on to her.’
      • ‘One woman did come on to me when I was 19 or 21, when I was at the end of drama school.’
      • ‘They really came on to me, with intense bedroom eyes and all that kind of stuff.’
      • ‘On top of that, she showed up at my house drunk and came on to me in front of my parents.’
      • ‘He came on to me, and before I knew what was happening, we were in the sack.’
      • ‘‘She seems to always be coming on to me, and it's really starting to get awkward,’ he said as he sat down on the counter.’
      • ‘She basically said he was coming on to her when he knew she was my girl.’
      • ‘Even more, I don't want to come on to her and end up making work a difficult place for her to be.’
      court, woo, pursue, run after, seek the company of, make advances to, make up to, flirt with, romance
      View synonyms
  • come out

    • 1(of a fact) emerge; become known.

      ‘it came out that the accused had illegally registered to vote’
      • ‘Somehow it came out that he was seventy years old, a fact that my father repeated politely for my mother and me.’
      • ‘And the word came out that everyone not in should stay away, and that those who were in should stay in the office as it was safest, and it just got more and more surreal.’
      • ‘She says the system worked in this case because your case was reversed before it came out that these guys had confessed.’
      • ‘Mid-April, it came out that the contract had gone $60 million over an $180 million budget.’
      • ‘Then the news came out that he had been diagnosed with terminal lung cancer, but he was going to try and make one more album before he died.’
      • ‘But later that weekend, it came out that everyone was enamoured with a piece of land near Fairlie, so sights had been set, plans had to be made.’
      • ‘She withdrew under a stormy cloud after it came out that she hadn't paid Social Security taxes on her housekeeper.’
      • ‘Then it came out that a wheelie bin being used by a contractor to store computer backup data tapes for five departments had been disposed of as garbage.’
      • ‘But we all said our piece, and then it just came out that heck, this is business, and we treat all our clients and customers with respect, right?’
      • ‘This was before it came out that he had only adopted a Liverpudlian accent in the first place to get a job with a radio station in Oklahoma, where all Brits were expected to sound like the Beatles.’
      become known, become common knowledge, become apparent, come to light, emerge, transpire
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Develop or happen as a result.
        ‘something good can come out of something that went wrong’
        • ‘There is, however, one valuable result that might come out of the leadership campaign.’
        • ‘She said proposals to change policy or procedure in response to survey results will come out of the standing committees of the council in the next year or two.’
        • ‘We are quite worried about this development as it has come out of the blue.’
        • ‘On the contrary, the autonomy of phonology is one of the firmest results to have come out of the past couple of decades of phonological research.’
        • ‘One of the main developments to have come out of the past two decades was the realisation of the need to diversify the economy to other equally promising alternatives.’
        • ‘We have seen some fantastic results come out of this and now that we have funding for two more years no doubt we will see a lot more.’
        • ‘So there's a definite commercial value that has come out of developing the technology behind the torch.’
        • ‘It's not as if a good result has come out of nowhere.’
        • ‘They come forward fearlessly with the research that they have undertaken and the results that have come out of it.’
        • ‘Somehow, I don't think that's the only result that will come out of this before it's all over, though.’
        end, finish, conclude, terminate, develop, result, work out, turn out
        View synonyms
      2. 1.2(of a photograph) be produced satisfactorily or in a specified way.
        ‘I hope my photographs come out all right’
        • ‘There are two more in the eyes, but this does not come out so clearly in the photograph.’
        • ‘Caterers go out of business; weddings have to be postponed or cancelled due to accidents and illness; wedding dresses get damaged and photographs don't come out.’
        • ‘Very rarely does a photograph come out exactly as I viewed it in my mind.’
        • ‘I hope they come out well enough I can just put them all up sight unseen at the end of the month.’
        • ‘In the 1950s photographs often didn't come out at all, or were so fuzzy that they were thrown away.’
        • ‘The features which occur in the largest number of the faces photographed coincide and come out strongest, and give the typical face.’
        • ‘I'm not the best photographer, so I hope they come out ok!’
        • ‘The meerkats seemed to be posing for her, so I just hope the pics come out ok.’
        • ‘They all took some photos which I hope will come out.’
        • ‘I tried taking a photograph but it come out as just a white blur in the distance across the usual city-scape.’
      3. 1.3(of the result of a calculation or measurement) emerge at a specified figure.
        ‘rough cider usually comes out at about eight per cent alcohol’
        • ‘They still have five or six million in sterling and US dollars and even divided among twenty robbers that still comes out at a tidy sum.’
        • ‘Four thousand times even the low-end figure of $500,000 comes out to $2 billion.’
        • ‘But with airport taxes the return fare comes out at £26.’
        • ‘That comes out at around £150 a week take home, and you have to try and live on that.’
        • ‘This complex calculation apparently comes out at £3.7b, a whisker under the mid-price for the offer.’
        • ‘When this was factored in, the actual figures came out as having one speed camera every 29 miles on the most dangerous roads, but only one every 35 miles on the safest.’
        • ‘When the expenditure by other Government Departments involved with the Presidency is taken into account, the overall cost comes out at over 9 million.’
        • ‘Well that's a revelation: Victoria's road-related death rate comes out at 0.01%!’
        • ‘As a percentage of gross national product, that comes out at 0.4%.’
        • ‘The profit to income percentage comes out at 4.74 per cent.’
      4. 1.4(of patience or a similar card game) be played to a finish with all cards dealt with.
    • 2(of a book or other work) appear; be released or published.

      ‘lots of interesting books are coming out’
      • ‘The chain is confidently predicting that the book will smash publishing records when it comes out on July 16.’
      • ‘The Review started as a monthly, and now is published daily with an expanded edition that comes out once a week.’
      • ‘Once back in New York City, the days turned into weeks, and I began to make calls to the publisher to inquire when my book would be coming out.’
      • ‘Even though the collection of articles that appeared in the first two years have now come out as a book, the serial continues.’
      • ‘When contrarian books come out, newsrooms would do well to have somebody already suited up for quick sleuthing.’
      • ‘She appeared on the show when the book just came out.’
      • ‘The book eventually came out at the start of this year with a Russian publisher.’
      • ‘Clarke's book didn't come out until after the film was released.’
      • ‘It appears that when the book first came out it only cost about $29 or so.’
      • ‘He has two children's books coming out at Christmas.’
      be published, be issued, be released, be brought out, be produced, be printed, appear, go on sale
      View synonyms
    • 3Declare oneself as being for or against something.

      ‘residents have come out against the proposals’
      • ‘You're the last one left who hasn't come out against me.’
      • ‘I'm not ready to come out against him at this point, as I want to look at his writings before I make that determination.’
      • ‘Local politicians have come out against the proposed route.’
      • ‘She comes out against Democrats; you come out against Republicans.’
      • ‘Lately even British crime writers have come out against her.’
      • ‘Instead, they have come out against such ill-conceived, ineffective rubbish as breed-specific legislation.’
      • ‘You have come out against an independent investigation of all that.’
      • ‘In July the Sunday Herald revealed that the Scottish Law Commission was sufficiently worried about the legal confusion that could be caused by the draft bill to have come out against it.’
      • ‘Now he's come out against the new plan for electing these folks through a complex series of town caucuses and called instead for direct nationwide elections.’
      • ‘Residents have come out against making any special arrangements for the summer solstice celebrations for fear of attracting more visitors than the village can cope with.’
    • 4with complementAchieve a specified placing in an examination or contest.

      ‘he deservedly came out the winner on points’
      • ‘This was a very evenly matched contest, and Crookstown came out the winners with the only score of the match.’
      • ‘The pupils came out deserving winners in the end.’
      • ‘Nevertheless these girls put in a great effort and deservedly came out winners on a score of 1 goal and 2 points to 2 points.’
      • ‘Roy had entered some jazz contest and came out the regional champion.’
      • ‘It re-ignites personal belief, faith and desire in oneself to achieve and to come out winning!’
      • ‘The top two teams in division two went head to head with Six Bells coming out victorious against Crescent ‘A’.’
      • ‘On Sunday morning the boys were ready and worked hard to come out victorious with a final score of 6-4.’
      • ‘The threat was clear and we managed, through a foreign policy that was realistic and vigilant, to get through it and come out victorious.’
      • ‘He wrote the commercial tax officers' examination, and came out second in the State.’
      • ‘Admittedly there have only been two meetings between the pair, but each time Clarke has deservedly come out on top.’
      1. 4.1Acquit oneself in a specified way.
        ‘surprisingly, it's Penn who comes out best’
        • ‘In my unscientific examination Garry came out quite well.’
    • 5(of a stain) be removed or able to be removed.

      • ‘Despite her best efforts, the stain didn't come out, and Josh was only left with a large wet mark that drew more attention than the stain, itself.’
      • ‘I went to the local convenience store and got a bottle with bleach alternative, and all of the stains came out!’
      • ‘If the stains didn't come out, it wouldn't be a big deal.’
      • ‘Really, the only reason I went through this to begin with is because I don't want to have to buy a new purse if the stains won't come out.’
      • ‘His self-loathing was like a stain that would never come out, no matter how many different cleaning chemicals you tried.’
      • ‘Even the toughest grease or ketchup stains will come out without effort if you catch them in their beginning stages.’
      • ‘I have it all gummed up with stain remover right now and before I go to bed, I'm going to pray one more time that the stain will come out.’
    • 6Go on strike.

      • ‘The coalfield was brought to a halt as pit after pit came out on strike.’
      • ‘Another 15,000 workers are now threatening to come out on a sympathy strike.’
      • ‘Thousands of schools and leisure centres were shut in July when local government workers came out on strike in a pay dispute.’
      • ‘But it is the lowest paid workers in the hospital who have decided to come out on strike.’
      • ‘Workers were not willing to take the risk of coming out on strike without solid union backing.’
      • ‘Over the next days some 250,000 workers in all came out on strike at some point, and almost 100,000 were on all-out unofficial strike.’
      • ‘But we don't like it and now we've all come out on strike.’
      • ‘The union was expecting that between 300 and 400 employees out of the total workforce of 700 would come out on strike today.’
      • ‘Two brothers I played soccer with stopped speaking to each other because one came out on strike and one kept working.’
      • ‘Four months later 10 million came out on a one-day general strike against plans to cut unemployment benefit rights and 2 million demonstrated.’
    • 7Openly declare that one is homosexual.

      • ‘For years the now openly gay singer refrained from coming out.’
      • ‘However, the source adds that they might never be able to come out publicly as a couple because the man is a footballer.’
      • ‘The new album has let her express her homosexuality and feelings about coming out, themes she's kept muted until now.’
      • ‘Then too, as more and more gays come out and live openly, they become more conveniently available targets for homophobes.’
      • ‘There are more gay and lesbian students coming out, at an earlier age, than ever before.’
      • ‘In coming out, your sexuality is now freed - it's not disguised.’
      • ‘There is a sense among gay men and lesbians that they can come out to family members but still cannot do so in public.’
      • ‘Every openly gay man knows that coming out isn't just a one-time occurrence.’
      • ‘I have realized that being openly and proudly gay means coming out repeatedly.’
      • ‘For me, coming out meant that I was an openly gay person in the lives of all who knew me.’
      declare that one is homosexual, come out of the closet
      View synonyms
    • 8(of a young upper-class woman) make one's debut in society.

      enter society, be presented, debut, make one's debut in society
      View synonyms
  • come out in

    • (of a person's skin) break out in (spots or a similar condition)

      ‘Jason came out in a hot flush’
      • ‘For weeks after each match he was mentally drained, sometimes coming out in cold sores.’
  • come out with

    • Say (something) in a sudden, rude, or incautious way.

      ‘a gentleman should not come out with those remarks’
      • ‘You always wondered what inappropriate remark he might come out with, and what would be her state of health.’
      • ‘He came out with so many good lines and injected much needed humour into it.’
      • ‘Few people would be able to get away with some of the cracks he came out with!’
      • ‘It was the way he came out with all these things while keeping a perfectly deadpan face that got her.’
      • ‘She makes me laugh with the things she comes out with.’
      • ‘It doesn't last long but it's marvellous the things he comes out with.’
      • ‘But miss her I do, for all the weird things she comes out with in her Scottish accent.’
      • ‘He was already embarrassed enough coming out with all that cheesy stuff.’
      • ‘Having only spoken on the issue on Friday, I wondered what new information he was going to come out with.’
      • ‘There we were, on the steps of the state library, sunning ourselves, and he came out with that.’
      utter, say, speak, let out, blurt out, burst out with
      View synonyms
  • come over

    • 1(of a feeling or manner) begin to affect (someone)

      ‘a great weariness came over me’
      • ‘Right about then a new feeling began to come over me.’
      • ‘A drowning sensation began to come over me, purely as a result of the way my throat began choking up, and my eyes became glazed over with liquid.’
      • ‘An uncomfortable moment came over the people in the room, a sense of collective shame.’
      • ‘He looked up, surprised at first, and then something uncomfortable came over his face.’
      • ‘She winced slightly and glanced regretfully down at the soda in her hand as a familiar feeling began to come over her.’
      • ‘She fell back onto the floor, and began to let darkness come over her.’
      • ‘But a sense of disquiet came over me when he began his exertions.’
      • ‘But then a queasy expression came over him and he began to fidget around.’
      • ‘An uneasy feeling began to come over him as he sat up straight in his bed.’
      • ‘A most uncomfortable feeling came over me then, starting at the back of my neck and continuing down through my spine.’
      1. 1.1informal with complement(of a person) suddenly start to feel a specified way.
        ‘they come over all misty-eyed with nostalgia’
        • ‘The highlight of the evening was watching our producer come over exceedingly giddy when she suddenly realised that he was not only sitting at our table but was sitting next to her.’
        • ‘But electoral logic dictates he appeal to younger voters and suddenly the Tory leader is coming over all tolerant and inclusive.’
        • ‘Asked to take a drugs test, he suddenly came over all twitchy.’
        • ‘If you suddenly come over all Austro-Hungarian, head for one of Trieste's historic cafés.’
        • ‘A game that looked incapable of serving up a goal for the majority of the first half suddenly came over all generous as the second got underway.’
        • ‘Not that we're getting all misty eyed and we're suddenly coming over all sympathetic for the players and the situation that they are now in.’
        • ‘She had suddenly come over very peculiar one afternoon.’
        • ‘‘I was clearing up after a cabaret night, when I suddenly came over all weird,’ he said.’
        • ‘The same cannot be said for many of the other joke-tellers who suddenly come over all authorial and decide it's time to express themselves artistically.’
        • ‘Very occasionally the mood changes and suddenly it come over all delicate, with an almost feathery touch.’
    • 2Change to another side or point of view.

      ‘a former star pitcher for the Braves, he came over to the Yankees near the end of his career’
      • ‘She has come over to the dark side.’
      • ‘But those rescued battery hens - a little bit like myself - have come over to the right side.’
      • ‘There is a long history of sections of the army and even the police coming over to the side of the people during insurrections.’
      • ‘You should get over them too, and come over to my side.’
      • ‘The waiting forces are awed by his majesty and come over to his side.’
      • ‘Even my parents have come over to the plastic side, with their fibre optic tree and tasteful glow-in-the-dark cherub ornaments.’
      • ‘There have been indications in government circles that the Department of Health may be coming over to his view.’
      • ‘I thought that they did not take it as seriously as rumor said they did, or else that they would see the justice of our cause and come over to our side at once.’
      • ‘Improbably, they even got one Republican to come over to their side.’
      • ‘They play on their own existing fears and those of others to attempt to get them to come over to their side; the fewer people who accept the new information, the easier it is to invalidate.’
  • come round

    • 1Recover consciousness.

      ‘I'd just come round from a drunken stupor’
      • ‘I felt a bit sleepy after coming round from the anaesthetic, but not sick.’
      • ‘The seriously-injured man had lost consciousness but had come round again by the time police arrived.’
      • ‘She lost consciousness and next remembered coming round on the floor being roused by him and two ambulancemen.’
      • ‘She undoubtedly lost consciousness and when she came round, she was in a state of abject terror and hysteria.’
      • ‘He lost consciousness momentarily and came round to find his attacker had been pulled off him.’
      • ‘She was rushed unconscious to Southend Hospital, but quickly responded to treatment and came round after a few minutes.’
      • ‘Then he remembered nothing apart from a brief moment of consciousness in an ambulance until he came round in York Hospital with a fractured skull.’
      • ‘Thankfully he did come round fairly quickly and the truth of the situation began to dawn on us.’
      regain consciousness, recover consciousness, come to, come to life, come to one's senses, recover, revive, awake, wake up
      View synonyms
    • 2Be converted to another person's opinion.

      ‘I came round to her point of view’
      • ‘When he announced his intention, towards the end of his days at Oxford, to become a rabbi, his mother accused him of doing it to spite them, although she came round quickly.’
      • ‘I have a feeling though that, Scotsmen aside, at long last public opinion may have finally come round to my point of view, which is why I venture to raise the issue once again.’
      • ‘Public opinion too had come round in favour of continuing broadcasting as a monopoly in the custody of the BBC, and there was no opposition to its transformation into a corporation at the end of the following year.’
      • ‘Public opinion is rapidly coming round to the idea that it was seriously misled.’
      • ‘I thought at the time that the cartoon was the usual poisonous attempt to shift blame, but I'm coming round to the opinion that there was some merit in the cartoon after all.’
      • ‘However, by the 1960s I had several colleagues who were great fans, and public opinion gradually came round to the view that he had been foolish rather than wicked.’
      • ‘I am coming round more and more to questioning whether we need a set, when we should be getting back to examining what the text really is and how we can present it to a modern audience.’
      • ‘The more he puts his case as superbly as he did last Tuesday, the more public opinion will come round as well.’
      • ‘The differences between the two sports far outweigh the resemblances - an opinion I came round to about a year ago when I first entered a squash hall.’
      • ‘There's considerable evidence that the public are coming round to our way of thinking on a wide range of issues.’
      be converted, be converted to, be won over, be won over by, agree, agree with, change one's mind, be persuaded, be persuaded by, give way, give way to, yield, yield to, relent, concede, grant
      View synonyms
    • 3(of a date or regular occurrence) recur; be imminent again.

      ‘Friday had come round so quickly’
      • ‘Friday has come round quite quickly and I'm excited at the thought of being reunited with my family.’
      • ‘He said: ‘We've got the June elections coming round so we are putting a big amount of national effort into that.’’
      • ‘He said that matron provided training for new members of staff until the regular annual training came round.’
      • ‘The worrying thing about getting older is that it all seems to come round again so much more quickly.’
      • ‘He believes his side will benefit from a week's rest and may yet prevail if they still have a chance by the time the last round of matches comes round.’
      • ‘Rehearsals went by smoothly and lunch came round pretty quickly.’
      occur, take place, happen, come up, crop up, arise
      View synonyms
  • come through

    • 1Succeed in surviving or dealing with (an illness or ordeal)

      ‘she's come through the operation very well’
      • ‘They are survivors who have come through a difficult situation wiser and stronger although undoubtedly sadder.’
      • ‘He says they are all stronger after coming through the illness and nothing can faze them.’
      • ‘But he also seemed very confident that the players he has used in the last two games have come through with flying colours.’
      • ‘That win stamped him as a progressive campaigner and, although he faces his biggest test to date tomorrow, he has every chance of coming through it with flying colours.’
      • ‘But they will come through this ordeal with honor and we will all be proud of them.’
      • ‘Afterwards, the woman and her partner feel relief that she has come through the ordeal.’
      • ‘He said the pensioner had come through her ordeal remarkably well and was unharmed, although sadder but wiser.’
      • ‘They have come through the fires of war with their physical health and spirits intact.’
      • ‘I think we can learn from this that there will be survivors who will come through all the evils of the world.’
      • ‘The couple arrived at court together in a united front after vowing they will come through the ordeal and will put it all behind them.’
      survive, get through, ride out, weather, live through, pull through, outlast, outlive
      View synonyms
    • 2(of a message) be sent and received.

      ‘a telephone call came through from Number 10’
      • ‘The message of religious tolerance comes through more explicitly afterward.’
      • ‘The most striking message that comes through the polls is that most Scots expect the parliament's powers to increase in the next decade.’
      • ‘That's the message that comes through loud and clear in the Labor Department data.’
      • ‘Some of these messages are coming through mysteriously truncated.’
      • ‘The message coming through is that the public at large and businesses in particular are actually much better educated.’
      • ‘While it may be historically inaccurate, as some are saying, and the blood and violence may be over the top, the message is coming through loud and clear.’
      • ‘This is the message that comes through so clearly, and Paul Tibbets says that he probably has a lot more in common with those Japanese men who went to war than the young Americans or Japanese.’
      • ‘I wouldn't have anything to do with it if that message didn't come through.’
      • ‘It's not worth it to try to specifically decipher his incoherent ramblings, but the message comes through anyway.’
      • ‘I'm on the ennui express, heading out of the city when the message comes through.’
      1. 2.1(of an official decree) be processed and notified.
        ‘his divorce came through’
        • ‘Nonetheless, when he died of a heart-attack on the day their divorce came through she remarried a week later.’
        • ‘Their final decree came through in October 2002, but by January 2003 they were a couple again.’
        • ‘She went to the police the day her divorce came through.’
        • ‘She's been with us since she was four months old; the official adoption comes through next week.’
        • ‘She remained Mrs Picasso long after the decree nisi had come through.’
        • ‘A letter tonight declared that I am now divorced… my decree absolute has come through.’
        • ‘I presume that when Official Information Act requests come through they will be released according to the Act.’
        • ‘Their divorce came through just weeks ago, after an eight-year separation.’
        • ‘The former boy-band star apparently wants to marry her as soon as his divorce comes through.’
        • ‘‘It will be a drug we will be looking at when it comes through the licensing process,’ said a spokeswoman for the Scottish Medicines Consortium.’
  • come to

    • 1Recover consciousness.

      ‘I came to in a corner of the room’
      ‘he was struggling to come to himself’
      • ‘Well, when the incident was over, I was on the floor in my living room and he kind of came to himself.’
      • ‘Suddenly coming to himself, parched, he demanded a drink of water.’
      • ‘I came to myself in the room; it was a basement of a house.’
      • ‘On coming to himself on Sunday morning, he got up and walked home, and a doctor was afterwards called in.’
      • ‘‘But knowing how defensive he can get when it comes to himself… I'm not so sure’ I sighed.’
      • ‘Abruptly coming to herself, Sara hastened to touch down lightly in front of her audience.’
      • ‘It was a little before noon when he came to himself again.’
      regain consciousness, recover consciousness, come round, come to life, come to one's senses, recover, revive, awake, wake up
      View synonyms
    • 2(of an expense) reach in total; amount to.

      ‘the bill came to £20,000’
      • ‘In total his bill came to about £60 and he left a generous £80 tip to the three staff serving him.’
      • ‘Our total bill came to 35.20 leva for three of us including beers.’
      • ‘Travel the whole weekend was expensive, coming to a total of just under £95 in the end!’
      • ‘The total bill came to nearly £8 billion and there were very real fears that the capital backers would be wiped out.’
      • ‘The total bill came to a pretty reasonable £35 for an excellent meal for two, including drinks.’
      • ‘Together with the drinks, the total bill came to £37.50-and we added a generous tip.’
      • ‘The bill in total came to £51.30, which is generally more than you expect to pay but the food is worth it.’
      • ‘Free connection has been replaced with an upfront charge, so 12 months online comes to a total bill of €400.’
      • ‘The total bill came to £35.30, which is excellent value for quality food.’
      • ‘With lawyers' fees plus the balance of the original bill, the total comes to almost $40,000!’
      amount to, add up to, run to, number, make, total, equal, be equal to, be equivalent to
      View synonyms
    • 3(of a ship) come to a stop.

  • come under

    • 1Be classified as or among.

      ‘they all come under the general heading of opinion polls’
      • ‘The other main arena for scientific projects and expeditions in the UK is archaeology, and this comes under the general umbrella of the Nautical Archaeology Society.’
      • ‘These come under the general heading of product liability.’
      • ‘Judging by the blurb it comes under the general heading of an ‘airport novel’ if the back cover is anything to go by.’
      • ‘All three came under the general heading of ‘natural philosophy’.’
      • ‘And surely complaining about the attack comes under the general category of ‘whinery.’’
      • ‘All these features are under threat from development and mismanagement, and their protection comes under the general heading of Earth-heritage conservation.’
      • ‘Town driving comes under the same general safety umbrella.’
      • ‘Now Peter had to decide what classification he came under.’
      • ‘One of those ravages comes under the general heading of ‘tumours’.’
      • ‘For some time, one of my favorite places to eat has been a chain that I suppose comes under the broad classification of ‘fast food’ but not exactly.’
    • 2Be subject to (an influence or authority)

      ‘for a time they came under the rule of the Venetian doges’
      • ‘The transportation system in Bangalore will witness a major overhaul, with the bus service and the metro coming under a common transport authority, he revealed.’
      • ‘Is there any type of character, in your opinion, that is more susceptible to coming under the influence of the Devil?’
      • ‘Those who are weak, however, are more ready to come under the care and authority of someone who is stronger.’
      • ‘However, they remained independent until coming under French colonial authority in 1899.’
      • ‘However, the convention itself makes it clear that it applies to all situations in which a subject population comes under the authority of a foreign occupier.’
      • ‘He said his sister had always been totally anti smoking and drugs and it was not until she came under the influence of an older boyfriend that she started to change.’
      • ‘The child comes under the authority of the Greek judicial system.’
      • ‘Second, don't expect commercially available software to alert you if you come under the authorities' suspicion.’
      • ‘Early in the war, he came under the influence of a middle-aged alleged mystic, a layman who had taken a vow of celibacy.’
      • ‘The answer is that depends on whether the seller or intermediary comes under any regulatory authority and, unfortunately, not all of them do.’
      1. 2.1Be subjected to (pressure or aggression)
        ‘his vehicle came under mortar fire’
        • ‘There are six men in the squad, and five of them saw their marriages or relationships come under severe pressure.’
        • ‘Both vehicles came under heavy fire from a group of men who were apparently lying in wait in bushes on the side of the road.’
        • ‘The bill has come under severe criticism and is being redrafted.’
        • ‘The group could also come under pressure from the aggressive rollout of broadband services by rivals.’
        • ‘If they fail to take account of local customs, they may come under attack from the authorities, competitors or criminals.’
        • ‘Urgent action is required on milk price as dairy farmers in the West are coming under severe pressure, he said.’
        • ‘In the late 1920s, Russian writers came under severe pressure.’
        • ‘As an activist, he came under attack from the authorities.’
        • ‘The troops were hit by the exploding vehicle and then came under mortar fire, he told a news conference.’
        • ‘The aggressive consumer finance stocks continue to come under selling pressure.’
  • come up

    • 1(of an issue, situation, or problem) occur or present itself, especially unexpectedly.

      ‘the subject has not yet come up’
      ‘something must have come up’
      • ‘And there are going to be a series of issues coming up in the Congress in the next few months that will test that.’
      • ‘This issue just keeps coming up again and again.’
      • ‘One of the issues which keeps coming up on both local and national agendas is the shortage of role models, especially for young people.’
      • ‘I'm not even sure that I'd vote on the issue if it were coming up for legalisation in my state; there are a lot more pressing economic issues on my mind.’
      • ‘‘Ninety-seven percent of issues that are coming up are localised,’ he said.’
      • ‘The surcharge will come into effect immediately for new policies issued and for policies coming up for renewal.’
      • ‘He says the one issue which kept coming up on the doorsteps in the recent General Election campaign was the state of the country's health service.’
      • ‘Well, I wondered how long it would take to get the values issue coming up.’
      • ‘Suppose they want to meet with you about an issue that is not coming up at council because their councillor doesn't want that to happen?’
      • ‘It's an old thread, but the same issues seem to keep coming up.’
      arise, present itself, occur, happen, come about, transpire, emerge, surface, crop up, turn up, pop up
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1(of a specified time or event) approach or draw near.
        ‘she's got exams coming up’
        • ‘If you're not available to attend tonight but would like to get involved you could give the school a telephone call at any time and they would fill you in on any other events coming up.’
        • ‘The local branch's main fundraising event is coming up in the summer when five bikers will embark on a sponsored motorbike trip on mainland Europe from May to June.’
        • ‘There are two events coming up to keep runners/joggers/walkers happy.’
        • ‘After a hard day, it's off to the student bar to talk about the events of nights past and plan the events of the night coming up.’
        • ‘There are several other events coming up including a talk on water drainage, pollution etc.’
        • ‘We've got a National Conference coming up soon where these issues will be considered.’
        • ‘But if a wedding or big social event was coming up, the trip to the barber's shop was essential to look their best.’
        • ‘The events coming up this year include an art exhibition in October which helps artists earn good money for their work.’
        • ‘A programme of events should, he believed, be targeted at fifth and sixth year students who were coming up near the voting age.’
        • ‘Is there a referendum coming up in the near future?’
      2. 1.2(of a legal case) reach the time when it is scheduled to be dealt with.
    • 2Become brighter in a specified way as a result of being polished or cleaned.

      ‘I cleaned up the painting and it came up like new’
      • ‘However certain well known tunes come up extremely bright and shiny, mixed with the sparkling transient tones of his freer moments in improvisation.’
      • ‘I took it home, and cleaned it up; and it came up a treat.’
    • 3Begin one's studies at a university, especially Oxford or Cambridge.

      • ‘Some freshers were so keen to get involved with the protest that they emailed her prior to coming up to Oxford at the start of this term to ask for ribbons.’
      • ‘Bearing this in mind, many are disadvantaged in that they come from a background of under confidence on coming up to university.’
  • come up against

    • Be faced with or opposed by.

      ‘I'd come up against this kind of problem before’
      • ‘Female journalists approached her afterwards, saying how it was about time that someone had said something about the chauvinist phenomenon they had been coming up against for the whole of their working lives.’
      • ‘One of the big questions that we're going to come up against in thinking through the home media hub will be how do we get people to buy the devices we're talking about.’
      • ‘The boys were not so successful, coming up against very strong opposition.’
      • ‘All the same, this is hugely damaging for him and something that he'll have to come up against constantly.’
      • ‘In fact, I've never come up against very many people who aren't willing to help me out a little.’
      • ‘He questioned whether enough intelligence was available to assess the number and capabilities of the forces they would come up against.’
      • ‘He also runs a successful retail consultancy business, helping to solve some of the problems that shops come up against.’
      • ‘Our supporters would expect a victory, but it took us 60 minutes to break them down and that's the way now with all of the teams we are coming up against.’
      • ‘That's something I can always remember coming up against as a player after I started out as a professional in 1987.’
      • ‘Both teams came up against very strong opposition but both teams held their own and played some very good football.’
      undergo, encounter, meet, have experience of, come into contact with, run into, come across, face, be faced with, confront, be forced to contend with
      View synonyms
  • come up with

    • Produce (something), especially when pressured or challenged.

      ‘he keeps coming up with all kinds of lame excuses’
      • ‘This is all that they are coming up with and we all know this is totally untenable.’
      • ‘I must stress that I haven't had the finished product back yet so I will have to see what the tailor comes up with.’
      • ‘It's interesting to see the system in action and the ‘decisions’ it comes up with.’
      • ‘Let's put the machine back on for one more spin cycle, and see what we come up with.’
      • ‘I'm quite excited about some of the ideas we're coming up with, but more details later.’
      • ‘I say to myself that whatever he comes up with, I must try to trust his instincts.’
      • ‘We'll have to see what he comes up with, but the portents are grim.’
      • ‘The catalyst for the plot and exploration of these ideas is a cunning plan one of the trio comes up with.’
      • ‘This is a classic case of someone putting two and two together and coming up with 83.’
      • ‘I'm suspending all future planning until I see what he comes up with on the report.’
      produce, devise, propose, put forward, present, think up, submit, suggest, recommend, advocate, advance, move, introduce, bring forward, put on the table, put up, offer, proffer, tender, adduce, moot
      View synonyms
  • come upon

    • 1Attack (someone or something) by surprise.

      ‘they could come upon us without warning and wreak havoc’
      • ‘Later, he had pretended to come upon her by surprise and she had given him a bloody lip that was swollen for a week.’
      • ‘The ferocity of her attack surprised even the fierce sea-raiders who had come upon this land from the north, and eventually she carved a path to where the banner lay on the ground.’
      affect, afflict, attack, hit, smite
      View synonyms
    • 2

      see come on (sense 2)
      • ‘What is the likelihood that a person who comes upon these non-professional pages will actually persist and try to find tourism-related information by other means?’
      • ‘Imagine coming upon some road works being done on a one lane bridge at milking time.’
      • ‘It was like coming upon ancient ruins in a jungle.’
      • ‘She tells us the story of coming upon a roadkill buck while taking a much-needed break from writing college papers.’
      • ‘He noted that cougars are often mistaken for golden retrievers and his best advice for anyone who suddenly comes upon a cougar is to stay still, make no noise and, if possible, try to back away from it.’
      • ‘Yet, from a reader's point of view, coming upon these sudden pockets of dread has a troubling effect.’
      • ‘My previous entry dealt with coming upon a younger version of myself as the possessor of endless possibilities as far as the future was concerned.’
      • ‘And we walked through churchyards at night, coming upon little patches of graves that were lit by flickering candles.’
      • ‘When a chauffeur comes upon his rich millionaire boss's tux, he can't resist trying it on.’
      • ‘It was like coming upon one cameo after another of large polished foliage framed in smoky clouds.’

Origin

Old English cuman, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch komen and German kommen.

Pronunciation

come

/kʌm/