Main definitions of coma in English

: coma1coma2

coma1

nounPlural comae

  • 1A prolonged state of deep unconsciousness, caused especially by severe injury or illness.

    ‘she went into a coma’
    • ‘The highest possible score is 15, and the lowest possible score is three, which indicates the most severe, deep coma.’
    • ‘This is often associated with deep and prolonged coma.’
    • ‘A large pulse through his brain sent him into a deep coma in which he slept for days.’
    • ‘Conversely, the recovery of people from what we would call comas or deep sleep could be interpreted as an example of miraculous resurrection, perhaps accounting in part for the enduring popularity of saintly healing.’
    • ‘More recently, some clinicians have tried to induce comas in patients whose brain damage doesn't come from a head injury.’
    • ‘He had been in a deep coma at the Royal Hospital for Neurodisability after suffering severe brain damage.’
    • ‘People can recover from comas, but not brain death.’
    • ‘After sustaining a severe heart attack in 1973, my grandmother sank into a deep coma and was placed on life support systems in the hospital.’
    • ‘Her doctors induced a coma in order to stop the spread of the infection.’
    • ‘Every now and then people in a deep coma are wrongly declared dead, and survive the experience.’
    • ‘There were several other rushed trips in ambulances to hospitals, going into comas and not knowing whether she'd come out.’
    • ‘Isn't it time you were lured into a prolonged, sophisticated coma?’
    • ‘Only patients with severe brain trauma, in a deep coma, do not respond.’
    • ‘The four-year-old was carried into the hospital in a deep coma, with a high temperature and a high level of malaria parasite in his bloodstream.’
    • ‘Severe toxicity leads to coma, profound hypotension, bradycardia, and asystolic arrest.’
    • ‘To treat a patient in a diabetic coma in hospital is also far more expensive than to provide maintenance doses of insulin.’
    • ‘Hyperglycemia is a condition in which the blood sugar is high and the person may go into a diabetic coma stage.’
    • ‘In one plot a taxi driver, who doesn't realise that he has diabetes despite having the classic symptoms, collapses into a coma in his car.’
    • ‘Headache, fever and drowsiness can lead to a deep coma but only very rarely.’
    • ‘Reye's syndrome can eventually lead to a coma and brain death.’
    unconsciousness, insensibility, stupor, oblivion, inertia
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1humorous A state of extreme lethargy or sleepiness.
      ‘after the film I settled into a coma’
      • ‘Ah yes, the food coma - the medical excuse to fall asleep on the couch.’
      • ‘You don't want to be in a food coma after the meal for obvious reasons.’
      • ‘This morning when slipping into my usual aural coma I found my mind wandering to a advertisement I'd caught a flash of by the side of the road from the bus on the way in.’
      • ‘Like I said, sorry for whatever may transpire, though alcohol coma may come before I get to any commenting or posting.’
      • ‘He would fall asleep on the sofa, claiming food coma, proclaiming it to be a compliment.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: modern Latin, from Greek kōma ‘deep sleep’; related to koitē ‘bed’ and keisthai ‘lie down’.

Pronunciation

coma

/ˈkəʊmə/

Main definitions of coma in English

: coma1coma2

coma2

nounPlural comae

Astronomy
  • 1A diffuse cloud of gas and dust surrounding the nucleus of a comet.

    • ‘Since comets are mostly composed of ices, their outer layer vaporises as they approach the Sun, forming a cloud of gas and dust called the coma, which gives them a fuzzy appearance.’
    • ‘He had acquired some sand in his pockets, and now he was charging them up and releasing them into the air like the coma of a comet.’
    • ‘As it approaches the Sun, heat causes ices in the nucleus to sublimate, creating a cloud of gas and dust known as the coma.’
    • ‘Rosetta's instruments will analyse the gases and dust grains in the coma that forms when the comet becomes active, as well as the interaction with the solar wind.’
    • ‘The second explanation is that the X-rays are just solar X-rays scattered by the dust present in the coma.’
    1. 1.1Optics mass noun Aberration which causes the image of an off-axis point to be flared like a comet.
      • ‘For the first time in optical design, aberration, diffraction and coma were described and understood.’
      • ‘These Seidel sums correspond to spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism, Petzval curvature and distortion.’
      • ‘The light from the null corrector goes to the mirror under test, and the alignment consists of pointing the corrector so that the return image is free of coma.’

Origin

Early 17th century (in botanical sense ‘tuft of hairs on seed’): via Latin from Greek komē ‘hair of the head’.

Pronunciation

coma

/ˈkəʊmə/