Definition of colostrum in English:

colostrum

noun

  • [mass noun] The first secretion from the mammary glands after giving birth, rich in antibodies.

    • ‘The colostrum supplies antibodies needed by the foal to fight off disease, and these antibodies are absorbed through the gut only during the first 24 hours of life.’
    • ‘The colostrum that mothers produce in the first few days after birth is not actually ‘milk’ at all, but an immensely important golden syrup rich in nutrients and immunoprotective proteins.’
    • ‘A mare has only a limited supply of colostrum, which contains antibodies essential for the foal.’
    • ‘Samples of serum, whole blood, colostrum, and milk were frozen until analysis.’
    • ‘Although absorption of antibodies via the intestine declines rapidly, the feeding of colostrum is still beneficial after 24 hours as it provides local protection in the intestine.’
    • ‘Similar proportions of mothers in both groups began breast feeding within 12 hours of birth and reported feeding colostrum.’
    • ‘A woman with normal breasts produces sufficient colostrum during the last trimester and at delivery to sustain twins or a large term baby until her milk comes in.’
    • ‘It is most important that lambs get an adequate supply of colostrum as soon as possible after birth.’
    • ‘I was told that my baby was not getting enough to eat because my milk had not come in yet and that colostrum was not enough.’
    • ‘As the first milk that comes from a cow's udder, colostrum is rich in growth factors, antibodies and high-quality protein, making it a potentially valuable supplement for bodybuilders.’
    • ‘During the first 2 to 3 days of life, your baby will get a special kind of thick milk called colostrum.’
    • ‘Antibodies acquired through colostrum at birth are critical to the newborn's health, but only last three to six months and while present can block the immune response to a vaccine.’
    • ‘Many people do not realise the importance of continuing to give colostrum, mixed with milk replacer, for the first two weeks.’
    • ‘Lambs which drink sufficient colostrum soon after birth will be protected from a disease common in intensive indoor lambing flocks in Pembrokeshire.’
    • ‘For example, for the first few days after delivery, a woman's breasts produce a thick, yellowish form of milk called colostrum.’
    • ‘One day I inadvertently put donor milk that had a high content of colostrum in the bottle.’
    • ‘It is critical that the calf receives adequate levels of colostrum immediately after birth.’
    • ‘It is unlikely that the small amount of colostrum ingested during the first feeding will significantly alter the birth weight.’
    • ‘We therefore implemented a new system, whereby all our newly-calved heifers are milked immediately for their colostrum.’
    • ‘The immunity to disease passed through the mother's colostrum called ‘maternal immunity’ usually lasts for several weeks in the puppy's system.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from Latin.

Pronunciation:

colostrum

/kəˈlɒstrəm/