Definition of collegiate church in English:

collegiate church


  • 1A church endowed for a chapter of canons but without a bishop's see.

    • ‘On his return he became a Catholic priest and then became a canon in the Gothic collegiate church at St Quentin back in his home region of Picardy.’
    • ‘At the south end of the historic town is Beverley Minster - before the Reformation a collegiate church - whose fittings, in particular, reflect its former prosperity.’
    • ‘The canons of the thirteen collegiate churches of his diocese were idle, or quarrelsome, or ignorant, or drunken, or lecherous, or all of the above; in his struggles to reform them, he had to invoke the help of the papal nuncio.’
    • ‘Similarly, the discussion of the collegiate churches sorts out problems of chronology and attribution becoming the best reviews available of their paintings and decoration.’
    • ‘The opulence of such clergy as were close to the court expressed itself in the overripe late Gothic of the great collegiate churches at Stirling, Linlithgow, Rosslyn, and Perth.’
    • ‘Often they tended vineyards adjacent to those of their bishops; collegiate churches could be founded elsewhere in the diocese as well, and they also acquired their own vineyards.’
    • ‘To serve as the Order's chapel a collegiate church dedicated to St George was established.’
    • ‘By office, John served as one of thirty canons at Saint-Martin's, which was one of seven collegiate churches in Liege.’
    • ‘St Valentine's remains are kept in Roquemaure's 14 th-century collegiate church.’
    • ‘The most famous of the relics of St. Lorenzo still existing is a small flask which allegedly contains his blood and which is venerated in the collegiate church of St. Maria in the small town of Amaseno (near Frosinone).’
    • ‘At the Reformation, Henry VIII's suppression of the monasteries and collegiate churches meant that cathedral choirs and the Chapel Royal became the main musical centres.’
    • ‘Cathedral and collegiate churches and household chapels were staffed both by men (canons and their substitutes under many different names, numbering up to 50) and by boy choristers; nunneries deployed women's voices alone.’
    1. 1.1US, Scottish A church or group of churches established under two or more pastors.