Definition of cole in English:

cole

noun

archaic
  • A brassica, especially cabbage, kale, or rape.

    • ‘Start and end the gardening season with cold-hardy vegetables that tolerate frost, such as peas, lettuce, cole crops, beets, and chard.’
    • ‘In general, you can fertilize transplanted vegetables (tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, head lettuce, and cole crops) and corn about 3 to 4 weeks after planting.’
    • ‘By studying how it works with one or more particular varieties, scientists will be able to devise strategies for breeding resistance in new and better broccolis - as well as in related cole crops, such as cauliflower and cabbage.’
    • ‘Vegetables such as cole crops, eggplants, onions, peppers and tomatoes really need to be started indoors in order to mature in a timely fashion.’
    • ‘The only vegetables to avoid are any of the cole crops, such as cabbage, mustard or broccoli.’

Origin

Old English cāwel, caul, related to Dutch kool and German Kohl, from Latin caulis ‘stem, cabbage’; reinforced in Middle English by forms from Old Norse kál. Compare with kale.

Pronunciation

cole

/kəʊl/