Main definitions of coke in English

: coke1coke2

coke1

noun

  • 1[mass noun] A solid fuel made by heating coal in the absence of air so that the volatile components are driven off.

    • ‘The coke is oxidized to carbon dioxide, which changes to carbon monoxide at high temperatures.’
    • ‘They needed coke produced from coal, and it was the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway that provided their salvation.’
    • ‘The decline of the coal industry also affected rhubarb growers by reducing the supply of cheap coal and coke used to heat the sheds.’
    • ‘Although he's done a good deal of work over a coal forge, today Ridge uses a gas furnace to reduce the damage to his lungs regular exposure to burning coke and coal can cause.’
    • ‘Before the discovery of large deposits of natural gas in the 1950s, gas was created by burning coal, coke, or oil.’
    • ‘Coal scuttles are essentially the things that you use to pour coal or coke into a little pot-bellied oven that you'd have in the centre of your room to warm yourself.’
    • ‘The traditional method for extracting pure iron from its ore is to heat the ore in a blast furnace with limestone and coke.’
    • ‘The production of charcoal by heating wood in the absence of air and of coke by heating coal in the absence of air were both well known to ancient peoples.’
    • ‘In most cases, one ton of coal will produce 0.7 ton of coke in this process.’
    • ‘Why would you want coke when coal was available, I reasoned.’
    • ‘The road was built more than 100 years ago to bring coke made from the coal mined in Crested Butte to the Smelters in Aspen.’
    • ‘They are also concerned with manufacturing useful components from the materials, for example, metals, coke, and alloys.’
    • ‘Rotary furnaces can use any carbon source such as coal, coke, or ebonite as reducing agent, and they can use a variety of fuels, such as oil, coal, or gas.’
    • ‘He showed how to fire up the forge in the smithy and produce coke from the soft coal.’
    • ‘In this reaction, the decomposition products of coke react with the metal oxide to produce carbon dioxide and the pure metal.’
    • ‘After much failure he eventually succeeded in substituting coal for coke, and joined forces with his father at his foundry at Bersham.’
    • ‘The coke is heated in an oven that has no access to outside air to burn off most of the impurities, leaving a fairly pure form of graphite.’
    • ‘In the case of making iron in a blast furnace, the carbon is added as coke, which is converted into carbon monoxide - the actual reducing agent.’
    • ‘The blowout was caused by increasing trade deficits in April, May and June and mainly due to falling exports of coal, coke, briquettes and metals.’
    • ‘The opponents of free trade were by and large those interests that feared British competition in textiles, coke and coal, iron, steel, and machinery.’
    firewood, wood, kindling, logs
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Carbon residue left after the incomplete combustion of petrol or other fuels.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Convert (coal) into coke.

    [as modifier] ‘a coking plant’
    • ‘He stood his ground throughout his challenging line of duty, which included the Battle of Orgreave, when police clashed with strikers on picket lines at the British Steel coking plant.’
    • ‘He was at the infamous Orgreave coking plant near Sheffield during a particularly ugly confrontation, and narrowly avoided being badly hurt at Woolley pit near Wakefield.’
    • ‘The site contains several scheduled monuments, including beehive coking ovens, calcining kilns, blowing engine houses, and a unique lift tower which was used to transport material to the top of the furnaces.’
    • ‘According to a source close to the deal, Ross hasn't made much headway in integrating his steel plants, and faced major capital outlays for computer systems and coking batteries, among other things.’
    • ‘The confrontation, dubbed by some ‘the last English civil war’ began in a field near the Orgreave coking plant and culminated in a charge by mounted police through the village of Orgreave.’
    • ‘Electricity could be generated from the gases released from blast furnaces and coking ovens, as it was in the Rhine valley by the Rheinisch-Westfälische Elektrizitäts-A.G., founded in 1900.’
    • ‘China has more than 1,900 coking ovens nationwide with capacity of 180 million tonnes.’
    • ‘Buses carrying miners were given a free run to Orgreave, a British Steel coking plant, whereas on previous occasions when they were going to picket the buses were stopped.’
    • ‘Ironmaking in general was handicapped by the unsuitability of most local coal for coking.’
    • ‘The former coking plant was the scene of bitter clashes between striking pit workers and police in 1984-a confrontation which included NUM President Arthur Scargill's arrest.’
    • ‘These phenolic substances form a major part of environmental pollutants that are produced in petroleum refining, coking and coal conversion, chemical plants, foundries, and pulp and paper plants.’
    • ‘It had shunting yards, coking ovens, a brand-new railway station, its own brewery and brickworks.’
    • ‘We used to use charcoal, but then we learned how to run coal through coking ovens.’
    • ‘Steel plants and coking furnaces were no longer our temples to Vulcan, they were sources of pollution and occupational disease.’
    • ‘The summer of 1984 and the Miners Strike witnessed some of its most violent scenes as battle lines were drawn between the police and pickets at the Orgreave coking plant near Sheffield, South Yorkshire.’
    • ‘One of the cases Lu cited involved calcium carbide, iron alloy and coking factories spread throughout a region straddling the borders of four north-central provinces: Inner Mongolia, Ningxia, Shanxi Shaanxi.’
    • ‘Gross profits from its Australian coking operations doubled last year, to $225 million.’
    • ‘With Finex, coal and ore are turned into iron without coking and sintering.’
    • ‘The Sewell seam coal was an ideal coal for coking, because it had a very high fixed carbon yield required for the iron-making process.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘charcoal’): of unknown origin. The current sense dates from the mid 17th century.

Pronunciation:

coke

/kəʊk/

Main definitions of coke in English

: coke1coke2

coke2

noun

  • informal term for cocaine
    • ‘Was it an implication that I am a pothead, or a coke addict?’
    • ‘Now, being a former coke addict myself, I know what she is going through as well as he.’
    • ‘But some will decide at some point that they want to get back on the coke and stop taking the nasal spray booster and then just wait a couple of weeks before using again.’
    • ‘He offers me some of the coke, I shake my head nonchalantly.’
    • ‘Bizarrely, he stashes the coke in Connie's bag, then gets shot in front of Connie and Carla while shouting their names.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, statuesque blonde George, a recovering coke addict, is being blackmailed by a Polish drug dealer named Broylin Grillo.’
    • ‘With Azrael around and herself under surveillance, it'd be impossible to get the coke and keep it on her person, much less sell it to any given buyer.’
    • ‘Coke can be hard or soft depending on whether its user is an outgoing party-boy/girl, or an unstable type who needs the coke to become an interesting person.’
    • ‘A dedicated coke addict, he had fallen in with a group of low-lifes living on Wonderland Ave.’
    • ‘As the money flows like water and the increasingly erratic Mirtha, a coke addict, makes things tough at home, the FBI begins to close in on poor George.’
    • ‘Different drugs like mescaline, coke, heroin and mushrooms are mentioned in the song.’
    • ‘It was coke, it was freebased cocaine, which is like homemade crack, really is what it is, and you smoke it.’
    • ‘Well, he's a self-deluded coke addict who got away with murder.’
    • ‘I remember meeting Christian at the beach; the beers, the other guys, the smoking… the coke.’
    • ‘When the BC bud was traded for American cocaine, said elements sold the coke and were left with an embarrassing whack of cash.’
    • ‘Instead, they're checking to see who had access to the coke.’
    • ‘Melanie also has a male friend, Brady, a recovering coke addict.’
    • ‘As his hand contacted her face, she ‘decided’ she no longer wanted the coke, and that she would fight her many addictions.’
    • ‘Living with them is Nelson, Rabbit's son, at 42 a recovering coke addict and careworker recently estranged from his wife, Pru.’

Origin

Early 20th century: abbreviation.

Pronunciation:

coke

/kəʊk/

Main definitions of coke in English

: coke1coke2

Coke

noun

trademark
  • short for Coca-Cola
    • ‘Heartened by this ambience and my recent clean bill of health, I order an apple pie and a large Coke.’
    • ‘Laid out on the table were bottles of alcohol, sodas, Cokes and crisps.’
    • ‘By the mid-1980s Coke was found in 155 countries, over 60 per cent of its sales were outside the United States, and more than 300 million Cokes were drunk every day.’
    • ‘Think about that blown up bloated feeling you experience when you have drunk too much coffee, tea or Coke.’
    • ‘There are now more non-cola drinks than there are Cokes.’

Pronunciation:

Coke

/kəʊk/