Definition of cognac in English:



  • [mass noun] A high-quality brandy, strictly speaking that distilled in Cognac in western France.

    ‘we went to a bar and had some cognac’
    [count noun] ‘a good range of cognacs’
    • ‘I was given a heavy chef's knife to split it down the middle, before preparing a mixture of shallots, tomatoes, cheese, wine and cognac for the grill.’
    • ‘The number of people who finish the evening off with an amaretto, sambuca, cognac, or brandy is on the decline, he says.’
    • ‘It helps to have lots of vodka, gin, scotch, brandy, and cognac for all to swill down.’
    • ‘I can clearly see the market opening beyond cognac and scotch whisky, possibly to vodka and gin.’
    • ‘At the current rate of shrinkage, blended Scotch may lose its spot to cognac and brandy within a few years.’
    • ‘Others around the room talk over cognac or whiskey in whispered voices.’
    • ‘The sunken wet bar was stocked with 20-year old Italian red wines and expensive cognacs, brandies and Scotch whiskeys.’
    • ‘The food is accompanied by copious amounts of vodka, cognac, wine, and beer.’
    • ‘Their fermentation and distillation process is more akin to the production of cognac, with French rather than American oak used for its maturation.’
    • ‘Unlike its cheap, nasty brandy competitors, cognac does have a reputation to keep up.’
    • ‘Although wine, beer, cognac, and champagne are popular, vodka is the most common drink.’
    • ‘This does not have the complexity of great cognac, but it will hit the spot for most palates.’
    • ‘She had given a party the previous night and drank several glasses of vodka punch, cognac, wine and beer.’
    • ‘This is one of the primary reasons why extended aging is not as important to tequila as it might be to bourbon or cognac.’
    • ‘Vintner receipts show he bought dozens of bottles of cognac and a similar amount of whisky.’
    • ‘Further south the heady brew is cognac, aged in oak casks and sought out by connoisseurs around the world.’
    • ‘There is an opinion that the addition of extra ingredients to a bottle of wine, or to single malt whiskies and cognacs, is an insult to the winemaker or distiller.’
    • ‘Tequila, like champagne or cognac, is an appellation that must conform to specific standards.’
    • ‘Without following these and other strict laws, the resulting spirit may not be called cognac.’
    • ‘A table at the bottom compared the calorie content of 100 ml of beer with the same amount of gin, rum, whisky, cognac and wine.’