Main definitions of cob in English

: cob1cob2cob3cob4COB5

cob1

noun

  • 1The central cylindrical woody part of the maize ear to which the grains are attached.

    • ‘Using a grater set over a bowl, grate the corn kernels off the cobs.’
    • ‘A cook might prepare ‘fried corn,’ by cutting the grains off of the cob and creaming them in a skillet.’
    • ‘I have since found the answer - as the ‘silks’ begin to form on the cobs.’
    • ‘The porcupine will gnaw at the base of the maize stalk and drop it, and in doing so is able to get to the maize cob.’
    • ‘Carefully peel the corn cob removing all of the silky threads and cut off the base so that it can stand flat on the table.’
    • ‘Using a sharp knife, cut the husks off the corn cob.’
    • ‘In addition to eating corn fresh, the kernels could also be dried to form a flour for breads and cakes, and the cobs were turned into corn pipes and toys.’
    • ‘Corn on the cob barbecues beautifully, as do bell peppers misted with olive oil.’
    • ‘She then opened a corn cob covered in foil and ate it.’
    • ‘It has a natural affinity with sweetcorn, so pile a few cobs on the table - a meal that should definitely be eaten with the hands.’
    • ‘If making a soup or a sauce, extract the milky juice from the bits of kernels left on the cob by scraping the cob with the dull side of a knife.’
    • ‘It produces an exceptionally large number of cobs in a range of colours which are not only totally edible but also, as dried flowers, highly decorative.’
    • ‘Hardwood bark mulch (oak or pine), rotted sawdust, and chopped corncobs are good mulches.’
    • ‘Some sit on thin pedestals or dangle from the tips of twigs; others perch directly on branches, lined up like kernels on a corncob.’
    • ‘Place the corncobs in a large saucepan and cover with cold water.’
    • ‘A Slovenian peasant removes corn from the dried cobs while his wife holds his new hat.’
    • ‘So my dad decided to set a trap for the villain, suspected to be a deer, and made this complicated contraption involving an old camera and some sort of trigger attached to a cob of corn.’
    • ‘Under the elevated train line along Roosevelt Avenue, cardboard turkeys and dried corncobs decorate storefront windows.’
    • ‘Cut the corn from the cobs and place the kernels in a large skillet.’
    • ‘The ‘Corncob Scarecrow’ requires students to contribute the most essential supplies for the project, corncobs and husks.’
  • 2British A round loaf of bread.

    ‘a round granary cob’
    • ‘This year it was his crusty and soft rolls, Chelsea buns, and large crusty cobs which caught the adjudicator's eye resulting in a cache of trophies.’
    • ‘This is a sort of British chowder, which is lovely eaten with a crusty cob, heavily spread with British butter.’
  • 3A hazelnut or filbert.

    as modifier ‘cobnut stuffing’
    • ‘Dry floral scents are boosted by tangy citrus aromas that deliver fresh lemon tinged flavours with just a hint of cobnut on the finish.’
    • ‘At this time of the year fresh juicy walnuts and cobnuts are available.’
    • ‘At yesterday's event, late-grown English strawberries, farm-pressed apple juice and sweet Kentish cobnuts were available.’
    1. 3.1 A hazel or filbert bush.
  • 4A powerfully built, short-legged horse.

    ‘he's got a nice young bay cob if you want to hack’
    • ‘He just untied the pack mule from its tie to the back of the cob's saddle and led him along the cobblestone path.’
    • ‘He owns a pair of cobs which pull the Romany caravan he built himself, and when the mood takes him they take to the road.’
    • ‘The judge said: ‘This is a superb cob and a worthy champion.’’
    • ‘The head groom lent him a large, strong, dappled grey cob named Trojan.’
    • ‘Rowan, a five-year-old cob and shire cross who is 16 hands tall, was trapped for six hours in a water-filled ditch at a farm.’
  • 5A male swan.

    ‘ganders and cobs have permanent pair bonds’
    • ‘My wife and our Labrador were attacked by a cob today, and although no physical harm was done they were both terrified.’
    • ‘There are ducks and cranes, and every few miles a cob and pen circle as only swans can in their own territory.’
    • ‘The male swan, or cob was unable to free itself for three days after a fishing hook became embedded in its leg and the fishing line got wrapped around it.’
    • ‘She said, ‘This was a large, healthy, handsome cob who was hit by a motorist and died with multiple injuries.’’
    • ‘The founding member of the organisation said a male cob was mowed down as it crossed the road.’
  • 6British A roundish lump of coal.

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting a strong man or leader): of unknown origin. The underlying general sense appears to be ‘rounded, sturdy’.

Pronunciation

cob

/kɒb/

Main definitions of cob in English

: cob1cob2cob3cob4COB5

cob2

noun

mass nounBritish
  • A mixture of compressed clay and straw used, especially in former times, for building walls.

    as modifier ‘cob and thatch cottages’
    • ‘They were to live at the Bluff homestead, a cob house built in 1860 of clay and chopped tussock.’
    • ‘Mixed in pits, the cob is then formed into small loaves, which are deposited on the foundation, then massaged and shaped by hand.’
    • ‘The cob cottage was reconstructed in the simple style of the Christchurch pioneer houses.’
    • ‘In the next 12 months alone, there is a need for almost 200 lime plasterers, around 140 wattle and daub craftspeople, over 100 glaziers and almost 60 cob builders.’
    • ‘When the cob mix dries, it takes on the hardness of sandstone.’
    • ‘Unlike clay pots, though, the walls of cob rooms are thick - 4 to 24 inches - strong and durable.’
    • ‘Earth-walled buildings such as Devon cob, Lincolnshire mud-and-stud and Cumbria clay buildings are very rare and also extremely friable and susceptible to damage.’
    • ‘In 1972 this two-roomed cob cottage which stands in front of the Museum was built with cob blocks from Fernside, and equipped with gifts from local families.’
    • ‘Students on America's 3,700 campuses are getting buzzed on building cob houses and fighting environmental racism.’
    • ‘Founders of urban ecovillage projects must usually forego any dreams of straw bale or cob structures, because building codes often are rigidly enforced.’
    • ‘In sharp contrast with the bare simplicity of the cob cottage is a sitting room furnished in the fashion of a 1905 home of a well-to-do family.’
    • ‘There has been a explosion of interest recently in the development of sustainable building materials, from straw bale to cob.’
    • ‘Earth building, such as cob, straw bale, and adobe, is gaining in popularity due to these homes' overall energy efficiency, longevity, beauty, and low environmental impact.’
    • ‘He imported their house from Australia in sections made of Australian hardwood, and later the walls were filled with cob made from local mud.’
    • ‘They may cultivate organic gardens, recycle human waste, build with cob and straw bale, and employ solar and wind power.’
    • ‘The traditional habitat of the Alsatian lowland consists of houses constructed with walls in half-timbering and cob and roofing in flat tiles.’
    • ‘The typical two-room house is built of cob (earth mixed with rice straw), coconut fronds, or raffia.’
    • ‘The remaining walls are made of cob, a mixture of sand, clay and straw.’
    • ‘Cement stucco can create serious problems when applied to straw bale, cob or adobe homes.’
    • ‘Builders of straw bale, adobe, cob and other types of natural homes use earthen plasters for interior and exterior walls, usually applying the plaster in two or three layers.’

Origin

Early 17th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

cob

/kɒb/

Main definitions of cob in English

: cob1cob2cob3cob4COB5

cob3

noun

in phrase have" or "get a cob on
British
informal
  • Be or get annoyed.

    ‘he used to go on holiday when the band were due to appear on TV (Mac'd get a real cob on about it)’
    • ‘We especially liked his first goal because he had a cob on as only he can.’
    • ‘He got a cob on and stopped playing, then one by one the rest of the team ran after him.’
    • ‘He can be competitive in training and when he's got a cob on with someone, he lets you know.’
    • ‘He has got a cob on, as I only have one ticket.’
    • ‘The band were great, although it seemed like the singer still had a cob on.’
    • ‘There have been many occasions when, due to having a cob on for whatever reasons, I've been tempted to answer the phone at work like that.’
    • ‘Well we say that to each other when one of us has got a cob on and so we just thought we'd make a song out of it.’
    • ‘Or has he got a cob on with the nation's hacks?’
    • ‘Raymond is what I was christened and what my mum calls me when she has a cob on with me.’

Origin

1930s: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

cob

/kɒb/

Main definitions of cob in English

: cob1cob2cob3cob4COB5

cob4

noun

  • variant spelling of kob

Pronunciation

cob

/kɒb/

Main definitions of cob in English

: cob1cob2cob3cob4COB5

COB5

abbreviation

  • Close of business.

    ‘you have until COB today to show us why you should not be disconnected’