Main definitions of coax in English

: coax1coax2

coax1

verb

[with object]
  • 1Persuade (someone) gradually or gently to do something.

    ‘the trainees were coaxed into doing boring work’
    with direct speech ‘‘Come on now,’ I coaxed’
    • ‘He kept on trying to coax her to walk into the water, but she adamantly shook her head.’
    • ‘She warns them that she doesn't want to wear the cloak but they insist and her mother coaxes her to go along with their request.’
    • ‘The negotiators talked to him and managed to coax him out.’
    • ‘The pang in my belly coaxed me inside to see what their table had to offer.’
    • ‘I tried to coax him down but I could see he was terrified.’
    • ‘Her natural buoyancy eventually coaxed us into conversation, and saved the day.’
    • ‘They're yachts, mainly, and very beautiful, and it wasn't long before my wife was coaxed into taking lessons.’
    • ‘The actors were somehow coaxed into performances that matched their gigantic surroundings.’
    • ‘I smiled and walked faster, coaxing him to walk faster too.’
    • ‘It was his father who saw his potential and started cajoling and coaxing him into playing.’
    • ‘I had to go down and personally coax him out of the car so that we could get him back here.’
    • ‘We weren't exactly abducted either, we were coaxed into coming into their house.’
    • ‘I coax him to the table by setting out an open beer.’
    • ‘This year I was coaxed into starting my holiday baking early.’
    • ‘You might see a fairly significant change if you could coax him into going for a 30 minute walk most days of the week.’
    • ‘After the fighting ended, he hid in the jungle for two years before he was coaxed into surrendering.’
    • ‘Once he was finally coaxed into a room with some of the city's finest musicians last year, he was hooked.’
    • ‘He waved at me as if he knew me already and coaxed me to come over and talk to him for while.’
    • ‘He was coaxed into a reading and soon found himself studying with an acting coach, having his long hair cut to marine length for the part.’
    • ‘Maybe he too had regrets, perhaps he wished he'd talked to him more often, coaxed him to spill out his memories and secrets.’
    persuade, wheedle, cajole, talk into something, get round, prevail on, beguile, flatter, seduce, lure, entice, tempt, inveigle, woo, manoeuvre
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1coax something from/out of Obtain something from (someone) by gradual or gentle persuasion.
      ‘we coaxed our fare money out of my father’
      • ‘He sharply criticizes the leader for using food aid as a diplomatic tool to coax concessions from rogue governments.’
      • ‘She was the only attendee, watching intently as he coaxed snakes from one basket to another with the mouth of his oboe.’
      • ‘He coaxes strong performances out of most of his cast.’
      • ‘I propped this glorious child on my shoulder and coaxed a burp from her.’
      • ‘Guided by an inner-something that could only have been instinct, she was soon making silly noises and coaxing delighted squeals from the little tyrant.’
      • ‘He's a big fella, well over 6 feet, with hands the size of tree stumps, but still able to coax sweet sounds from a guitar.’
      • ‘If he can coax some defectors from the opposition, he may reach a majority.’
      • ‘The charities are brutally businesslike in coaxing dollars from the wallets of the super-rich.’
      • ‘She cocked her head to one side with a sly smile, like a toddler coaxing a treat from a grownup.’
      • ‘He coaxed a superb performance from the young actor.’
      • ‘Many of his memories of his homeland are of sitting in traffic jams or waiting in lineups that ate up time he would have preferred to spend coaxing notes from his guitar.’
      • ‘He is adept at coaxing performances from actors with little or no experience.’
      • ‘She was able to coax new insights from those oft-interviewed.’
      • ‘She has coaxed excellent performances from the girls and uses animation and dream sequencey stuff extremely well.’
      • ‘His timing remained exquisite, expertly coaxing laughs from the bleakest onscreen situation.’
      • ‘At dinner, he was the focus of everyone's attention, and they coaxed some information from him.’
      • ‘The director coaxes some terrific performances from a noteworthy cast.’
      • ‘He coaxes some excellent performances from his singers.’
      • ‘Alex was coaxing a fire from the wet wood we'd gathered.’
      • ‘He uses a prepared piano on a number of tracks, sometimes coaxing harpsichord-like timbres from it.’
    2. 1.2with object and adverbial Arrange (something) carefully into a particular shape or position.
      ‘her lovely hair had been coaxed into ringlets’
      • ‘Use a metal pastry scraper to coax the dough into shape, and a minimal sprinkling of flour, as necessary.’
      • ‘He coaxed the mouse onto his hand and put it into a tiny wicker basket.’
      • ‘He nodded, and soon she went about her work, coaxing the muddy roots from the ground for springtime use.’
      • ‘Half an hour was spent coaxing it off the track to safety.’
      • ‘It is a special puzzle challenge to coax these sets into a symmetrical shape.’
      • ‘After coaxing them to the surface with your feet, it's a simple matter of reaching down and scooping them up.’
      • ‘The birds are in the trees, and if I could coax them down to my shoulder, then my trek may be warranted.’
      • ‘You could try printing it on color transparency plastic and then heating it with a hair dryer whilst it is gently coaxed on to the surface of the mask.’
      • ‘After coaxing the bird on to his arm, he started to make his way back home.’
      • ‘She placed the lantern in the boat and coaxed the pig aboard as it had crossed the river many times with her before.’
      • ‘She shook her unruly mane of red hair, attempting and failing to coax it into some semblance of order.’
      • ‘She knew no greater thrill than coaxing a child from the womb, and receiving it alive into her own hands, wet, warm and squirming.’
      • ‘When my turn arrives I slowly, carefully coax the boat round until the wind is directly behind it.’
      • ‘Carefully, and ever so gently, Tristan coaxed my weight upwards to more of a sitting position.’
      • ‘Few of us have a team of trained hair professionals to dry, set, curl and coax our hair into perfection every morning.’
      • ‘Some were seen coaxing their pigs up the stairs!’
      • ‘With a broad wooden scraper, he coaxed the paint back and forward before lifting the screen to survey his handiwork.’
      • ‘She coaxed the boys' hair into snowy peaks.’
      • ‘My son caught it by knocking it off the car with a twig, then coaxing it on to a piece of card, and then putting it in a jam jar.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from obsolete cokes ‘simpleton’, of unknown origin. The original sense was ‘fondle’, hence ‘persuade by caresses or flattery’, the underlying sense being ‘make a simpleton of’.

Pronunciation

coax

/kəʊks/

Main definitions of coax in English

: coax1coax2

coax2

noun

mass nouninformal
  • Coaxial cable.

    • ‘Another good antenna that's been popular around here for over 20 years is the ‘J-pole’ made from a piece of old TV antenna twin lead and a piece of coax.’
    • ‘It can serve up to four video streams simultaneously - one to a locally connected HDTV and three to additional client boxes connected via coax anywhere in the home.’
    • ‘After all, you can't lay fiber, buy cable modems and pay for cable TV with surplus coax.’
    • ‘Yes, if I were a nesting bird, I'd find a coil of coax to be the perfect shape for a nest.’
    • ‘Today, a bad picture isn't a problem with the rabbit ears or a loose bit of coax: it means that the decompression of a digital video stream has gone all wonky.’

adjective

informal
  • Coaxial.

    ‘coax connectors’
    • ‘Be it cable or satellite, just plug the coax cable into the coaxial cable input, and you have access for up to 125 channels.’
    • ‘Although both devices may have coax connections, once you see the image quality between them, you'll see why you should go with S-Video.’
    • ‘In areas where cable modem service is available, the cable company can sculpt that down to the single coax line.’
    • ‘As multimedia enthusiasts can tell you, a coax connection is not the best choice for image quality, to put it mildly.’
    • ‘In addition to the antennas supplied, the antenna connector on the hand held radio will accept a common coax antenna cable connector.’

Pronunciation

coax

/ˈkəʊaks/