Definition of coachload in English:

coachload

noun

British
  • A group of people travelling in a coach.

    ‘coachloads of tourists trudging round Oxford’
    • ‘And, later in the day, a coachload of tourists from Dublin, many from the United States and Canada, also dropped in.’
    • ‘Mont Blanc is the biggest natural tourist attraction in Europe, pulling in easily catered-for coachloads all year round.’
    • ‘Then there are the people who come up in coachloads from places like Yorkshire.’
    • ‘This beautiful watering hole sits in a quiet suburban area which is pleasingly free of coachloads of dazed tourists.’
    • ‘We get coachloads of planners coming round here to take a look.’
    • ‘Three coachloads of anti-war protesters were turned around at Lechlade while trying to get to the RAF base last March.’
    • ‘In 1975 the hotel began its first package deals in an attempt to lure the Scots to York for New Year celebrations, and the idea became so popular that coachloads of people would descend on the city.’
    • ‘There are five coachloads of people arriving each day and parking at Ashburner Street, near the market.’
    • ‘Several coachloads of supporters are going to Manchester for the match.’
    • ‘Students from Manchester and Leeds will join a coachload of 50 journalists on a tour of 10 of the city's top nightspots tomorrow night.’
    • ‘Behind me coachloads of foreign tourists were still arriving.’
    • ‘The champion jockey brought a coachload of family and friends to Doncaster to share in his achievement on the final day of the Flat season.’
    • ‘Outside the hotel a piper is being photographed by a South African rugby player as he plays a welcoming tune for a coachload of Scottish tourists.’
    • ‘The protesters are hoping to take two coachloads of pensioners to the Houses of Parliament.’
    • ‘At one stage fire crews had to retire to a safe distance and it was nine hours before the last of the three coachloads of residents was able to return home.’
    • ‘A coachload of workers from Bradford has travelled to Brighton for the protest.’
    • ‘Two coachloads of parents and children were expected to leave the schools at 1pm to see a petition handed in.’
    • ‘Everywhere you go there are coachloads of tourists.’
    • ‘The group is one of the most active in the country and is sending more than 30 coachloads of marchers to the demonstration in London.’
    • ‘As well as local customers, coachloads of people were coming to Blackburn from as far away as Birmingham to spend their money.’

Pronunciation

coachload

/ˈkəʊtʃləʊd/