Main definitions of coach in English

: coach1coach2

coach1

noun

  • 1British A comfortably equipped single-decker bus used for longer journeys.

    as modifier ‘a coach trip’
    • ‘The emerging dawn had been a wonderful sight and the traffic free roads and ease with which we ambled along in our luxury coach made the journey really pleasant.’
    • ‘After checking into our hotel in Edinburgh we had a coach journey to the wedding that was going to take us nearly two hours.’
    • ‘If the system works it could lead to early warning systems being installed in coaches, lorries and cars.’
    • ‘Oh, and some foolish coach driver forgot 46 passengers on the Terminal yesterday.’
    • ‘She was allowed to sit at the front on the coach journey home, on her own, with the rest of the class huddled together in the back three rows.’
    • ‘They travel to Philadelphia for a plane to Boston where they will get on a coach for the four-hour journey to the resort.’
    • ‘Chester and York attract coach loads of visitors with their Roman walls and artefacts.’
    • ‘A local woman's car was in collision with the front of the coach and she was trapped.’
    • ‘I went on a coach trip years ago and had a great time, so I knew the idea could work.’
    • ‘We will have to hire a huge number of coaches to replace the services on the closed stretch of track.’
    • ‘Another member of the congregation is believed to have been on the coach trip.’
    • ‘The new ruling has infuriated coach drivers, who now have nowhere to park.’
    • ‘Instead, we booked a nine-hour coach journey into Dallas, Texas, where we would stay for a couple of days, before moving down to Austin.’
    • ‘In Mr Smith's letter he pointed out that many well-known coach tour operators were passing through Sligo without stopping.’
    • ‘A coach load of friends from Manchester is expected to travel south for the funeral.’
    • ‘On the return journey the coach driver took the group through the city of Luxembourg, a first visit for many.’
    • ‘But the six-month trip was cruelly cut short when thieves broke into a tour coach and stole all her possessions - forcing her to return home.’
    • ‘I think the only time I've ever been to Birmingham was on an evening coach journey for a school theatre trip, probably twenty years ago.’
    • ‘The coach trip to the Lake district and Scotland is now completely booked out.’
    • ‘There are fewer bookings from coach tour operators, particularly from the US.’
    bus, minibus, van
    View synonyms
  • 2British A railway carriage.

    • ‘No need for extra coaches or extra trains, just wedge more passengers in to the existing carriages.’
    • ‘The crew had already said their goodnights and shut off most of the lights in the coaches.’
    • ‘After we strolled up to one of the coaches, a conductor glanced at our boarding passes and gave us our seat numbers.’
    • ‘Once aboard 93, we observed that there were plenty of empty seats in the coaches towards the front.’
    • ‘For five days we made our way across country in a railway coach that, for some reason, seemed to have square wheels.’
    • ‘I haven't been able to get a look at the number of coaches or locomotives yet.’
    • ‘She enjoyed riding in a railway coach behind the smoking engine and remembers that she even thought she would like to be engine driver when she was older.’
    • ‘But the locomotive and coaches were not affected and all passengers would have noticed was the train coming to a normal stop.’
    • ‘This inconvenienced the passengers, who couldn't even move around to buy tickets or board railway coaches.’
    • ‘The train was packed, although it appeared everyone was being placed into one or two coaches.’
    • ‘Chuckling, the gentleman opened the door leading from the reserved coach to the sleeping compartments beyond.’
    • ‘It would get even later as they had to board the groups of children in the front two coaches.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, the company will be adding extra coaches to its trains to help regional travellers heading to the races.’
    • ‘Police were called to Waterloo station after passengers on the train from Paris heard a knocking sound in compartments underneath the coaches.’
    • ‘We were not running heavy at all, as there were plenty of empty seats in all of the coaches.’
    • ‘Two other coaches on the railway have been obtained from Hungary.’
    • ‘So, why haven't the railways upgraded their coaches?’
    • ‘Heritage railways are keen for visitors to have parties or reserve coaches for corporate entertainment.’
    • ‘To relieve this problem, the rail companies will need to run more frequent services or increase the number of coaches on their trains.’
    • ‘The new design also means better lighting, quieter coaches and better suspension, giving a superior ride.’
    • ‘After his marriage in 1897 he worked as a painter of railway coaches, as a tinter of photographs, and as a house painter.’
    • ‘One of the coaches would be carrying only New York City-bound passengers.’
    carriage, wagon, compartment, van, pullman
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1North American The cheapest class of seating in an aircraft or train.
      • ‘I think Frank and I are going to go exploring a bit and try to find Molly in coach.’
      • ‘I was not sure if they ever got to seat any coach passengers who wanted dinner in the diner.’
      • ‘If spacious first class is too pricey, request the first row of coach class.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, airline policies usually do not mandate hourly beverage service in coach class.’
      • ‘Then the airlines turn around and sell the coach seat I just vacated to another passenger.’
      • ‘They sat down together in the front of coach class.’
      • ‘All of Southwest's seats are coach, and seating is first-come, first-serve.’
      • ‘On bigger jets, that can mean as few as two attendants in coach class trying to sell food to more than 100 passengers.’
      • ‘There's a reason those economy seats are uncomfortable: If it seems like the seat cushions in coach class are worn out, it's not your imagination.’
      • ‘This trip was in the planning stages for a long time. I wanted to make the trip alone in coach class.’
      • ‘He offered us a seat in coach with a refund of our sleeping car fee, but we were not interested in that.’
      • ‘Our train consists of six coach class cars, a cafe car, and one business class car.’
      • ‘It is the only major carrier to continue offering free meals in coach class on all flights after other airlines suspended meal service or started selling snacks as a way to cut costs.’
      • ‘Sale fares are available daily for Envoy class, but only between Monday and Thursday for coach class.’
      • ‘There were three seats on each side of the plane in coach.’
      • ‘The airline will still serve free beverages in coach class, according to The Associated Press.’
      • ‘Under the latter option, the eight coupons include six coach class and two business class tickets.’
      • ‘With the new configuration, the aircraft will have 24 seats in first class and 192 in coach.’
  • 3A closed horse-drawn carriage.

    • ‘The horse-drawn coaches were rough and uncomfortable transport.’
    • ‘But the six horses pulling the coach continued to accelerate rapidly, and the boy could not keep up for long.’
    • ‘Horse-drawn coach rides throughout town are also a popular activity for tourists.’
    • ‘It was a wonderful sight to see because many of the guests arrived in horse-drawn coaches and carriages.’
    • ‘A large coach house situated to the rear of the house provides excellent opportunities.’
    • ‘At the turn of the 20th century, he became landlord of the nearby Coach and Horses and ran a livery business from there with horse-drawn coaches and traps for hire.’
    • ‘Memorable events include the angel parade at the city hall and tours by horse-drawn coaches.’
    • ‘I was once in the crowd that greeted him when he drew up in a horse-drawn coach.’
    • ‘We reckon the rent on the coach house would be €700 a week.’
    • ‘Occasionally a big coach drawn by four horses would come up the drive and pass around by me, this made me very happy.’
    • ‘Horse-drawn coaches for hire in nineteenth-century Paris were also painted yellow.’
    • ‘Here the traffic consisted not of coaches and carriages but of wagons and hand-carts.’
    • ‘Me. Who set all of the horses free when the coach house caught fire?’
    • ‘In the 1670's, the city's Corporation received complaints about the traffic congestion caused by hackney coaches.’
    • ‘Think of Cinderella's coach turning into a pumpkin, and the Grimms' tale of Hansel and Gretel about to be devoured by a witch.’
    • ‘Horse-drawn coaches heading for Scotland have been replaced by commuters on the A1, which is right on the doorstep.’
    horse-drawn carriage, trap, hackney, hansom, gig, landau, brougham, cab
    View synonyms

verb

  • no object, with adverbial of direction Travel by coach.

    ‘fly or coach to the shores of the Mediterranean’

adverb

North American
  • In economy class accommodation in an aircraft or train.

    ‘many employees are now flying coach instead of business class to Europe’
    • ‘Yoli and I were traveling coach to Chicago since the trip would be only ten hours.’
    • ‘We normally ride coach and bring along some extra padding to make the seats more comfortable.’

Phrases

  • drive a coach and horses through

    • Make (something) ineffective.

      ‘he's driving a coach and horses through our environmental legislation’
      • ‘Because it's unwritten it's very easy to drive a coach and horses through, because it has no legal protection in text.’
      • ‘The internet drove a coach and horses through this prim arrangement.’
      • ‘It does seem that we are driving a coach and horses through the planning policies with this.’
      • ‘If there is an accident, someone could sue the club and a good lawyer could probably drive a coach and horses through any defence the club might put forward.’
      • ‘What is the point of having planning conditions when people can drive a coach and horses through them?’
      • ‘But the legal people have told me they could drive a coach and horses through that one.’
      • ‘She asked: ‘Why should we be driving a coach and horses through our own policy to save the education authority and the Church a lot of money?’’
      • ‘To allow this would be to drive a coach and horses through the traditional monopoly of the legal profession to appear on behalf of litigants.’
      • ‘We have to uphold our policies or anyone can come along and drive a coach and horses through them.’
      • ‘It would drive a coach and horses through NATO's doctrine of nuclear strikes as a last resort.’

Origin

Mid 16th century (in coach (sense 3 of the noun)): from French coche, from Hungarian kocsi (szekér) ‘(wagon) from Kocs’, a town in Hungary.

Pronunciation

coach

/kəʊtʃ/

Main definitions of coach in English

: coach1coach2

coach2

noun

  • 1An instructor or trainer in sport.

    ‘a football coach’
    ‘the coach of the Canadian team’
    • ‘Head football coaches are often hired without regard to specific criteria or clearly stated qualifications.’
    • ‘But, ironically, so many football coaches do deeply believe that the toughest sport teaches virtues.’
    • ‘His mother Judy, the former national tennis coach, chaperones him to tournaments and does his washing.’
    • ‘"Being a national team coach is a tough job.’
    • ‘So you want to be a college basketball coach?’
    • ‘Jenny now works as an assistant women's coach at the University of Oklahoma.’
    • ‘Either the football coach or an athletic trainer initiated the injury report.’
    • ‘We worked in a recreational center as coaches, teaching little kids how to play basketball.’
    • ‘There are current football coaches who have been doing their jobs longer than he has.’
    • ‘A US women's basketball coach says that she has unconditional love for the players.’
    • ‘It's no secret that inner-city coaches in any sport have one of the toughest jobs in all of high school athletics.’
    • ‘They hired a football coach who had been at a big school, but had a mediocre record.’
    • ‘Each age group is run by a qualified rugby coach, but parents are encouraged to lend a hand.’
    • ‘He said his executive used trained coaches and referees to educate sports teachers in schools as a way of broadening participation in youth programmes.’
    • ‘Nominations for the program must be submitted via each swimmer's club coach.’
    • ‘The basketball coach or the music teacher needs no convincing regarding the value of drill and practice on fundamental skills.’
    • ‘So what, you ask, does a college basketball coach know about the state of college football?’
    • ‘Children will be coached by top level coaches in each sport.’
    instructor, trainer
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A private tutor who gives extra teaching.
      • ‘I was thinking about how to prepare and hired a private coach.’
      • ‘K. C. refused to look at the notes and did only the portion where she studied with her coach and later practiced the words in sentences.’
      • ‘In later years she was a coach and teacher, as well as a stager of ballets.’
      • ‘His wife, Kelly, keeps busy as an English teacher and coach at Oakdale High School.’
      • ‘She said having a private coach has been a real benefit.’
      • ‘If the money was going for reading coaches in elementary schools, I might have been less likely to vote against it.’
      • ‘The concert was great, a wind band like they have in the schools but made up of adults many of whom are coaches and teachers.’
      • ‘Margaret Thatcher covered her status as a woman when she trained with a voice coach to lower the timbre of her voice.’
      • ‘I have borrowed these tools from writers and editors, from authors of books on writing, and from teachers and writing coaches.’
      • ‘Money apparently can't buy you love or a decent acting coach.’
      • ‘When it comes to reading, parents should think of themselves more as coaches than teachers.’
      • ‘Nature, of course, is improved upon by a phalanx of speech coaches, tutors, finishing lessons, cosmetics specialists and designers.’
      • ‘Much of my success in 1998 came from the lessons and training program my coach provided me.’
      • ‘Voice coach Sonia has trained some of the north west's top singers.’
      • ‘A coach is trained to pick up nuances that others miss.’
    2. 1.2Australian
      another term for coacher

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Train or instruct (a team or player)

    ‘he moved on to coach the England team’
    • ‘I coach a junior high team and we have a problem with the scores being very one sided.’
    • ‘His son was one of Indonesia's top players and now coaches the U.S. badminton team.’
    • ‘Despite coaching several of Britain's brightest stars, he yesterday announced that he would not go to Sydney, because it would take the spotlight off his athletes.’
    • ‘By the 5th grade, our physical education was passed to the hands of the woman who also coached the girl's sports teams.’
    • ‘It's very difficult to coach players of such varying ages and experience within a team, so the way you approach it is very important.’
    • ‘He went on to become head of the maths department but also taught rugby and coached the school's various teams.’
    • ‘For a time he coached swimmers, then moved into the business world.’
    • ‘Throughout my playing career and my short time in management, I never thought players should determine who coached the team.’
    • ‘He wants to be out on the pitch coaching and training a team.’
    • ‘I enjoy picking my kids up from school, attending all their school activities and coaching their little league teams.’
    • ‘The recent National Lottery grant received by the club to train and coach swimmers was welcomed by Mr Martin.’
    • ‘He coached Super Bowl teams in Philadelphia and St. Louis.’
    • ‘He recruited or coached all of the players, and the team still adheres to the principles he instilled.’
    • ‘Jeffrey gave up his job as a professional player and began coaching a major league baseball team.’
    • ‘It was last season when he was ruminating on the difficulty of coaching a superstar in his twilight years.’
    • ‘He is a quiet player on the court, he coaches teammates, but doesn't get very emotional one way or the other.’
    • ‘He found coaching his children's sports teams to be impractical.’
    • ‘The team was trained and coached by Paul Gleeson.’
    • ‘Teams of 1012 players will be coached as a team in preparation for next season.’
    • ‘Talented young players will be coached and trained at the Football Academy.’
    1. 1.1 Give (someone) extra teaching.
      ‘she was coached for stardom by her mother’
      • ‘I learned the finer points of grammar as a high schooler coaching elementary-school kids.’
      • ‘I would like to be a coach, to coach young dancers in the roles I have danced.’
      • ‘The student who used to coach her had found a summer job and had no more time to take care of her training.’
      • ‘A range of instrumentalists plus one of the finest international jazz singers, Tina May, will coach students in jazz and big band playing.’
      • ‘Therefore, students were coached to improve their communication skills (both verbal and written).’
      • ‘In addition, retired dancers earn extra money coaching young artists so they can accept holiday engagements as guests in smaller companies.’
      • ‘The girls were coached by their teacher and the headmistress.’
      • ‘The family and a drama teacher who coached Diana in public speaking are all thought to be contesting ownership of the recordings which were made in the mid-1990s.’
      • ‘Parents first got their children privately coached by school teachers.’
      • ‘Tutors usually taught in their own homes, but rich families would invite teachers to their residences to coach their children.’
      • ‘One of the teachers took him under his wing and coached him in drama.’
      • ‘What more could Peter achieve if he was coached within the college system?’
      • ‘He was a drama teacher and also coached the speech team.’
      • ‘Two students coached by Pardina have won major prizes at the Prix de Lausanne international ballet competition.’
      • ‘These teachers were coached by trainers from the Education Ministry.’
      • ‘She was being professionally coached and was halfway through recording a compact disc of love songs to launch her career.’
      instruct, teach, tutor, school, educate, upskill, guide, drill, prime, cram, put someone through their paces
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Teach (a subject or sport) as a coach.
      ‘he teaches history and coaches rugby’
      • ‘He entered administration after coaching basketball for 22 years at every level from grade school to high school to college.’
      • ‘I would probably be playing or coaching another sport.’
      • ‘During this time he coached basketball, directed choirs and built and renovated houses.’
      • ‘Now 58, he lives in south London and coaches football in schools.’
      • ‘Aged 57, he is deputy head at Solihull junior school, where he coaches rugby.’
      • ‘He was also hired by New Albany High School in the autumn of 1913 to teach Spanish, Physics and Mathematics and to coach basketball.’
      • ‘Todd has been involved in coaching basketball at the high school, college or professional level since 1976.’
      • ‘As a teacher Andy worked at the City of London School, where he coached cricket and rugby.’
      • ‘The only other thing I do that generates a similar feeling is coaching basketball.’
      • ‘He played rugby for 25 years in the U.K. and Europe before taking an interest in coaching the game.’
      • ‘Ben's hobbies are playing and coaching football.’
      • ‘I have coached both swimming and water polo at the club, high school and collegiate levels.’
      • ‘Now retired, he spent his time teaching geography and coaching soccer, a life he loved very much.’
      • ‘For the Club to continue more parents are needed to help out with coaching basketball.’
      • ‘He is moving his family to Idaho this summer and will begin coaching football at the high school his sons will eventually attend.’
      • ‘He began his teaching career in 1935 at Storer College, where he taught English and coached football.’
      • ‘Handball is now coached in over 80 Scottish primary schools, with volunteers from the association giving youngsters after-school tuition every week.’
      • ‘Harris, who has extensive experience coaching international basketball, said he isn't worried about the language barrier.’
      • ‘His primary teaching emphasis will be coaching Iowa State vocal students.’
      • ‘For her first 10 years on the job, she coached basketball and taught physical education.’
      instruct, teach, tutor, school, educate, upskill, guide, drill, prime, cram, put someone through their paces
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 Give (someone) instructions as to what to do or say in a particular situation.
      ‘he had improperly coached a witness to testify more credibly’
      • ‘They collude, have unlimited access to finance, and bring witnesses who are coached to commit perjury.’
      • ‘None of the tutorial sessions are designed to coach students for a standardized test.’
      • ‘We played dodgeball without sissy rules and our gym teachers coached us to hit the other players where it hurt the most.’
      • ‘One boy was coached by several different language teachers to help him spell words with foreign roots, not to be able to speak or read the language better.’
      • ‘The formation flight got exciting as I coached the junior pilot through several maneuvers.’
      • ‘The teacher also coached some students and allowed others to share answers during the actual exam.’
      • ‘Throughout the process, he has coached prospective candidates.’
      • ‘Over the prison phone, he'd been coaching his alibi witness to commit perjury, so he had to explain the general setup inside a courtroom.’
      • ‘The attorney representing the woman tried his best to coach the woman as instructed, and in an hour, the court reconvened.’
      • ‘Teachers have, quite understandably, responded by coaching students into exams they are likely to pass and by discouraging less able students from sitting exams at all.’
      • ‘They're coached for the tests all the way through year six when music, art, history and geography are all sacrificed in favour of a curriculum of exam preparation.’
      instruct, teach, tutor, school, educate, upskill, guide, drill, prime, cram, put someone through their paces
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4 Give (someone) professional advice on how to attain their goals.
      • ‘Knowing how hard it is to get auditions, especially with English National Opera, this chance to be coached by ENO professionals was too good to miss.’
      • ‘He knows how to teach children and how to coach fellow teachers.’
      • ‘Taylor is also the managing director of a professional development and executive coaching company.’
      • ‘All the coaches will be lecturers at the colleges who have studied for professional coaching qualifications.’
      • ‘The study reveals that the Army is doing an especially poor job of dialoguing with, counseling, and coaching junior officers.’
      • ‘I was in Stockholm a total of three days and then went directly to Athens were I was coaching candidates for the Genée Award in two solos that I created last year.’
      • ‘The junior committee do a sterling job in organising and coaching the junior members.’
      • ‘This film is about how I learned to be a good father through coaching.’
      • ‘Parents are coached in the clinic on the use of appropriate parenting skills which they gradually apply at home and in public places.’

Origin

Early 18th century (as a verb): figuratively from coach.

Pronunciation

coach

/kəʊtʃ/