Definition of cluster in English:

cluster

noun

  • 1A group of similar things or people positioned or occurring closely together.

    ‘clusters of creamy-white flowers’
    ‘they stood there in a frightened cluster’
    • ‘This deciduous upright, open shrub has glossy, bright green leaves and short clusters of fragrant, clove-scented golden yellow flowers from mid spring onwards.’
    • ‘Blooms appeared in long clusters of densely packed white flowers.’
    • ‘The flowers are borne in large clusters of 15 to 24 units, with each unit maturing at different times although flowering during the same season.’
    • ‘She rushed over to his cluster of trees, gripping one as she lurched forward, racing with her eyes to see what was the source.’
    • ‘Many environmental factors may stimulate cluster root formation.’
    • ‘The deer continues moving past the cluster of grapevines I'm hiding in and now I can see her clearly.’
    • ‘White lights entwined with silver ribbon draped the window sills, door frames, and banister, bunched with clusters of holly and mistletoe.’
    • ‘This shrub bears clusters of white flowers in the spring.’
    • ‘Botrytis bunch rot is especially severe in grape cultivars with tight, closely packed clusters of fruit.’
    • ‘They are very hardy and produce large clusters of small flowers.’
    • ‘Whole bunches or clusters of grapes are deliberately placed, with care to ensure that the berries are not broken, in an anaerobic atmosphere, generally obtained by using carbon dioxide to exclude oxygen.’
    • ‘‘For novices, I would say that the easiest way to form the wreath is by simply poking the clusters of greenery into the bound hay, newspaper or moss,’ says Elaine.’
    • ‘Berries start off green, closely resembling a small gooseberry, and hang firmly in clusters of three to five.’
    • ‘At the top of the stems there are tightly packed bracts of rich blues and purples surrounding clusters of purple-blue flowers in late spring and summer.’
    • ‘Small flowers in large, dense clusters are produced only in spring.’
    • ‘The nashi grow in tight clusters of 8-10 fruits, and each cluster needs to be carefully dismantled and the fruits clipped off one at a time, then carefully packed.’
    • ‘It is these adult shoots that produce the flowers and berries - clusters of tiny, nectar rich blossoms, followed by round, blue-black, yellow or orange fruits.’
    • ‘Javion picked a beautiful purple flower from a small cluster of flowers, and offered it to me.’
    • ‘Two of the squad, perhaps more accustomed to the city environment than jogging about in the sticks, got a little freaked out by the clusters of trees, and were separated from the main party.’
    bunch, clump, collection, mass, knot, group, clutch, bundle, nest
    crowd, group, knot, huddle, bunch, gathering, throng, swarm, flock, pack, troupe, party, band, body, collection, assemblage, congregation
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Astronomy A group of stars or galaxies forming a relatively close association.
      ‘there are several clusters in Cassiopeia’
      • ‘The centre of our galaxy lies within a cluster of stars in the constellation Sagittarius.’
      • ‘Two vast cavities extend away from the super massive black hole in the cluster's central galaxy.’
      • ‘Studies of two distant galaxy clusters have found that galaxies formed relatively early in the history of the Universe.’
      • ‘An excellent example is the cosmological problem, since it contains scales of interest ranging from that of a single star to that of a large cluster of galaxies.’
      • ‘We know what matter looks like today because we see galaxies, galaxy clusters, and galaxy superclusters.’
      • ‘Astronomers may see meteors produced by the annual Perseid shower, before pointing their telescopes at distant galaxies and star clusters.’
      • ‘Astronomers have long exploited this correlation between age and color to study the ages of stellar populations in star clusters and galaxies.’
      • ‘These large dark clouds may eventually evaporate or, if there are sufficiently dense condensations within them, give birth to small star clusters.’
      • ‘A team of European astronomers, including several from the UK, have uncovered a super star cluster in our own Galaxy, the Milky Way.’
      • ‘The most easily visible part of galaxy clusters, i.e. the stars in all the galaxies, make up only a small fraction of the total of what makes up the cluster.’
      • ‘Astronomical observations have confirmed more or less beyond doubt that stars, galaxies and clusters of super galaxies are receding from the earth and from one another.’
      • ‘There exists a well-defined population of material aggregates in the Universe - planets, stars, galaxies, and clusters.’
      • ‘Caroline also compiled catalogs of star clusters and nebulae.’
      • ‘A double star cluster in a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way is pictured above.’
      • ‘Among the many mysteries in the universe is the dark matter in galaxies and clusters.’
      • ‘Galaxies often congregate to form clusters of galaxies.’
      • ‘We sometimes use the word nebula to refer to galaxies, various types of star clusters, and various kinds of interstellar dust or gas clouds.’
      • ‘By the end of that process, matter could move and coalesce on its own, forming planets and stars, as well as galaxies, clusters, and superclusters.’
      • ‘There is a higher proportion of elliptical and fast-rotating spiral galaxies in dense clusters than in small groups.’
      • ‘They're searching for superdistant, ancient protogalaxies lurking behind huge clusters of galaxies closer to Earth.’
    2. 1.2Linguistics A group of consonants pronounced in immediate succession, as str in strong.
      • ‘I believe that the programme allows up to 9 consonants in a cluster, but only word-internally.’
      • ‘Thus, our strong emphasis on onset clusters succeeded in inducing a small but reliable transfer effect.’
      • ‘The software was unaware of complex character clusters associated with consonant/vowel modifiers in Indian languages.’
      • ‘Let's say you're in a language that uses schwa to break up consonant clusters, but nowhere else.’
      • ‘The present orthographic system was introduced in the fourteenth century by the religious reformer Jan Hus, who instituted a system of diacritical markings to eliminate consonant clusters.’
      • ‘… if one chooses the Latin, French, or Italian language, since German is much more difficult because of its many closed syllables and consonant clusters.’
      • ‘This paper examines one aspect of second language syllable structure, syllable-final clusters, in the English of a Vietnamese L1 speaker.’
      • ‘Consonants regularly occur in strings or clusters without intervening vowels: initially, as in stain and strip, finally, as in fetch and twelfth, medially, as in dodging.’
    3. 1.3 A natural subgroup of a population, used for statistical sampling or analysis.
      ‘ten clusters from all the primary health centres were selected’
      • ‘The examples focus on the process of conducting a cluster analysis of transfer pricing.’
      • ‘These were considered sufficiently small to assume statistical independence within a cluster.’
      • ‘Cluster analysis was used to determine the clustering of populations in multivariate space.’
      • ‘Moreover, except for this one attempt nobody has tried to use cluster sampling to measure deaths by violence.’
      • ‘A common approach is to initially treat every sample as a cluster and to join the closest clusters together.’
      • ‘We also recruited a large number of clusters and performed statistical analyses taking cluster randomisation into account.’
      • ‘Despite the small sample sizes for some of our cluster groups, many cluster differences still attained statistical significance.’
      • ‘To determine how many natural clusters exist within a given sample, various stopping rules have been developed.’
      • ‘However, an expert at the Institute of Occupational Medicine in Edinburgh said it was ‘probably true’ that most clusters of illness happened by chance.’
      • ‘A major issue in any study is maintaining the distinction between statistical clusters and their geographical expression.’
      • ‘This difference was significant, even in the rigorous statistical analysis for the cluster level design, controlling for confounding variables.’
      • ‘However, use of cluster randomisation rapidly leads to a doubling of the sample size.’
      • ‘The critical thing to understand here is that statistics cannot tell you the likely deviation of a cluster sample unless the distribution is random!’
      • ‘As noted above, cluster sampling tends to underestimate the impact of focused violence.’
      • ‘Cluster sampling is a sampling technique where the entire population is divided into groups, or clusters, and a random sample of these clusters is selected.’
      • ‘It says a long-term epidemiological study should be set up in the area to establish if there are any clusters of diseases which might be attributable to the radar's presence.’
      • ‘Policy makers should consider testing health service innovation using cluster randomised controlled trials with the hospital as the sampling unit.’
      • ‘Using cluster analysis, a statistical method that determines subpopulations in a group, three distinct patterns of behavior emerged.’
      • ‘The researcher used cluster sampling in this study and also eliminated participant duplication.’
      • ‘Each cluster should be a statistical scale-model of the entire population.’
    4. 1.4Chemistry A group of atoms of the same element, typically a metal, bonded closely together in a molecule.
      ‘noble-metal clusters supported on an acidic carrier’
      as modifier ‘a cluster compound’
      • ‘These cluster ions can, however, be broken up by a flow of dry nitrogen gas (curtain gas).’
      • ‘In the centers of these molecular clusters, called micelles, the molecular chains are packed together densely.’
      • ‘Nevertheless, there were no significantly supported clusters including molecules from both vertebrates and invertebrates.’
      • ‘These clusters were once separate molecules, called amino acids.’
      • ‘Absorbing a photon can force a photosensitive cluster of atoms to reposition a chemical bond and create a kink in a polymer chain.’
      • ‘Research has since shown that laser vaporization of graphite produces clusters of carbon atoms whose sizes range from two to thousands of atoms.’
      • ‘Similar patterns are seen in small atomic systems, such as the closed shells of valence electrons in metal clusters.’
      • ‘Proteins containing iron-sulfur clusters play important roles in biological systems.’
      • ‘In metallic clusters, the metal atoms are either directly bonded through metal-metal interactions or are bridged by appropriate ligands.’
      • ‘A chelate is a chemical compound in which one atom is enclosed within a larger cluster of atoms that surround it like an envelope.’

verb

[no object]
  • 1Form a cluster or clusters.

    ‘the children clustered round her skirts’
    • ‘There is a lack of social services in neighborhoods where families with the most needs cluster together’
    • ‘In a knowledge economy, smart people tend to cluster together.’
    • ‘We got back to find a huge crowd of people clustered around his desk whispering and giggling.’
    • ‘Five kids cluster around her, asking her to fill in the yellow certificate showing they've put in their time.’
    • ‘Other young women in headscarves clustered around her, their eyes blazing too.’
    • ‘But they don't live alone, they cluster together in tight-knit communities and range out along the verges and in warm spots under hedges and at the edge of copses and thickets.’
    • ‘I was in my car and heading out of the driveway yesterday when I noticed the pigeons clustered around outside the second story window of the barn.’
    • ‘Defensive, impenetrable, they cluster together for security, and perhaps that is part of the artist's intention.’
    • ‘Guests, many with sons and daughters in the U.S., clustered round the TV.’
    • ‘The five of us spent the next few hours clustered around the pool table.’
    • ‘We clustered around the few desks with radios; some went back to their desks, tried to work, tried to bring up the Internet, and returned to the radio.’
    • ‘Inside the home, the girl and her brothers clustered around the mother.’
    • ‘Hordes of excited children clustered around the working model of a mountain railway system with trains criss-crossing with intricate precision.’
    • ‘The crowd clustered round the sandy square was yelling encouragement at the players, who frowned in concentration in the fading light.’
    • ‘Most people cluster on the peaks of mountains and build their houses on stilts, hoping to keep their youth as long as possible.’
    • ‘A bunch of small children had clustered around it - it was the only one on the street.’
    • ‘Inevitably, most of the early morning shoppers clustered around the road, trying to get a look at what was going on.’
    • ‘Teenagers clustered around in groups, chattering excitedly or busy text messaging family to pass on the news before rushing off to celebrate in the sun, although it was not all joy.’
    • ‘The cars of the migrants crawl west by day, and cluster together beside the roads by night.’
    • ‘Several other decisions were made within the first hour as journalists clustered round the newsroom television sets.’
    • ‘Fire trucks clustered around the scene and the ground was covered with mounds of white, fire-retardant foam.’
    congregate, gather, collect, group, come together, assemble
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Statistics (of data points) have similar numerical values.
      ‘students tended to have marks clustering around 70 per cent’
      • ‘Standard deviation is the measurement of how scores are clustered or dispersed in relation to the mean.’
      • ‘We have said that when multiple repeated tests are performed results will cluster around the ‘true’ value.’
      • ‘Standard errors have been adjusted for clustering within families.’
      • ‘Average clustering coefficients and standard deviations of the averages for node degree bins are shown.’
      • ‘However, while a few genes do show rather high transition bias, most of the estimates cluster tightly around the median value.’
      • ‘Similarly, in scientific data mining, algorithms seek to cluster, generalize, and classify patterns and correlations in databases.’
      • ‘Our analysis also ignored the fact that scores are clustered at practice level.’
      • ‘In both analyses, we computed robust standard errors adjusted for clustering at the firm level.’
      • ‘We fitted town as a fixed effect and school as a random effect to allow for clustering at school level.’
      • ‘Although there were outliers, the majority of the data points clustered around the population mean.’
      • ‘However, peer group bias appears clustered with instrument manufacturer.’
      • ‘This method thus allows for clustering without a priori knowledge of the number of clusters present in the data set.’

Origin

Old English clyster; probably related to clot.

Pronunciation

cluster

/ˈklʌstə/