Main definitions of club in English

: club1club2

club1

noun

  • 1treated as singular or plural An association dedicated to a particular interest or activity.

    ‘I belong to a photographic club’
    as modifier ‘the club secretary’
    • ‘If the school allows parent-organised clubs to meet on school premises, then it must do so on a neutral basis.’
    • ‘She began the year eating lunch alone in the library, and put aside any interest in school clubs and activities.’
    • ‘To establish special interest groups and clubs to meet the needs of the young people.’
    • ‘The secretary gave a detailed report on the activities of the club during the year.’
    • ‘He also thanked the local media for the publicity it had given the club's activities over the past number of years.’
    • ‘In that first issue the Editor found space to give an account of the activities of several clubs and associations, some of which are no longer functioning.’
    • ‘Its sub groups included clubs for activities like drama, art and crafts, and country dancing.’
    • ‘This course may be of particular interest to clubs and societies in the area.’
    • ‘In motoring, the state automobile associations began as sporting clubs but quickly became service organisations and insurers.’
    • ‘The club would include creative activities such as arts and crafts.’
    • ‘They stress the importance of club activities to the creation of a healthy, well-rounded individual.’
    • ‘Reports on the club's activities and finances were given by the secretary and treasurer.’
    • ‘If we are to move forward, we must espouse this more positive approach in all dimensions of the club's activity.’
    • ‘This is part of the club's fund raising activities and in all over thirty kids will make the journey.’
    • ‘The hotel offers free swimming for children and other special discounts on club activities.’
    • ‘Sadly around fifteen years ago interest waned and the club ceased to be active.’
    • ‘You are asked to list recreational interests and activities, membership of clubs and societies.’
    • ‘The club have plenty of activities lined up and are looking forward to a busy year.’
    • ‘College campuses are rife with activities, interesting speakers, clubs, performances, you name it.’
    • ‘A committee of young people has been set up to run the club and its activities.’
    • ‘I had asthma, various allergies and a sharp pain in my right side, so I joined a slimming club.’
    society, association, organization, institution, group
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The premises used by a particular club.
      ‘a jazz club’
      ‘a social club’
      • ‘And pubs, clubs and other licensed premises were gearing up for the new era of drinking, with the launch of the new, more flexible licensing laws.’
      • ‘The jazz club where I used to hang out in the city centre was raided last week.’
      • ‘There are pubs, clubs, bars, restaurants, cafes, galleries and museums - facilities galore.’
      • ‘He gives concerts every Friday evening in the vineyard jazz club and I have yet to get out there to witness this prodigy.’
      • ‘My parents use to sneak me into jazz clubs when I was underage’
      • ‘After a gourmet meal overlooking the Adriatic, the couple can take a short walk and visit one of the many wine bars, jazz clubs or outdoor theatres the city has to offer.’
      • ‘Later we will have dinner and drinks, before dancing the night away at a jazz club.’
      • ‘I usually have to go into Manchester if I want to go to a jazz club, for example.’
      • ‘They were also told to stay away from any licensed premises, particularly pubs and clubs.’
      • ‘It will make it an offence to light up in a pub, bar, club or restaurant and offenders could be fined.’
      • ‘I had walked into the jazz club with little or no expectations.’
      • ‘It is thought that the attack took place at a club in empty premises above shops.’
      • ‘His father was in the hospitality business, being involved with restaurants, jazz clubs and a small hotel.’
      • ‘Like many other people here, I would rather spend the evening at home than risk going to a bar, club or restaurant.’
      • ‘All licensed premises such as pubs, clubs, restaurants and even cinemas and theatres will have to apply for new style licences.’
      • ‘Nursing homes, social clubs, pubs, filling stations and hotels across the city have all been gobbled up by developers and turned into flats.’
      • ‘Pubs,clubs and other licensed premises in most of Australia will be smoke free by July, officials announced last week.’
      • ‘Visually, the film perfectly recreates the dark and smoky atmosphere of 1950s jazz clubs.’
      • ‘Tens of thousands of revellers are expected to flock into the city centre's pubs, bars, clubs and restaurants.’
      • ‘As a teenager, he had sat in the coffee bars and jazz clubs, and later watched rock 'n' roll and blues enter the city.’
    2. 1.2 An organization offering members social amenities, meals, and temporary residence.
      ‘we had dinner at his club’
      • ‘The first members of these clubs were military officers, landowners, and professional and business men.’
      • ‘It could also force change on social clubs and other organisations which insist that male members wear ties.’
    3. 1.3usually with modifier A commercial organization offering members special benefits.
      ‘a shopping club’
      • ‘There is also the threat of a competition across the area from commercial health and fitness clubs.’
      • ‘You may have a drink or a snack at the Pool Bar at pool club membership prices.’
      • ‘Becoming a member of an investment club would benefit her greatly.’
      • ‘Car club members pay a monthly subscription and then hire by the hour for less than usual car hire rates.’
    4. 1.4with adjective or noun modifier A group of people or nations having something in common.
      ‘the wild man of the movies refused to join the teetotal club’
      • ‘How many nations need to join the nuclear club before we need a newer, nastier Deadliest Weapon In The Universe?’
      • ‘Poland was finally confirmed as one of the new club of European nations.’
      society, association, organization, institution, group
      View synonyms
  • 2treated as singular or plural An organization constituted to play matches in a particular sport.

    as modifier ‘a football club’
    • ‘Although he has played some club matches, this will be his initial first-class game.’
    • ‘He said the team was playing training matches with local clubs to help it tune up for the tournament.’
    • ‘He is a great player and captain for both club and country and that is why I have put him in my dream team.’
    • ‘They have grown to become the biggest club in the Football League.’
    • ‘So what if she next decides she wants her own football club, playing at the bottom of her garden.’
    • ‘I remember the Boxing Day matches between the two clubs and the fierce rivalry they generated.’
    • ‘A board member of a football club has managed to secure one of the most sought after signatures in the game.’
    • ‘At that same moment, the captain of the badminton club walked into the gym.’
    • ‘In recent years there have been hardly any problems at club matches or international games.’
    • ‘From the outside, one would have to say he was not in control of the football club.’
    • ‘A lot of the players here haven't got the passion needed to play at this football club.’
    • ‘Any player who cannot play, please inform your club captain, so a reserve pair can take your place.’
    • ‘I pulled him back into the football club and gave him a year's contract with a view to making it longer.’
    • ‘The sixth game was evenly matched, with both clubs playing good defense and the pitchers throwing well.’
    • ‘All this of course costs a great deal of money and it seems that our flagship clubs in whatever sport are struggling to find the sponsors locally.’
    • ‘He was a nice man to work for and he made me the club captain for the first time in my career.’
    • ‘Yes we do have a problem with a minority of fans at away games, but so does every football club in the country.’
    • ‘He is club captain and that's why, if he's back, it's going to be a big boost for the other players.’
    • ‘The council had so far employed six players from the football club and was considering employing some more.’
    • ‘Can we blame league club managers for not motivating their players to work harder to become more skilled by practising much more?’
    team, squad, side, group, line-up
    View synonyms
  • 3A nightclub playing fashionable dance music.

    as modifier ‘the club scene’
    • ‘He was in his early 20s when he became a DJ and began to play at clubs and night spots throughout the region.’
    • ‘For the first time in my life however, I really want to be young again so I can be part of the club scene.’
    • ‘A lot of the club and rave scene is decadent and I really don't like this aspect.’
    • ‘On the club front, every night seems to have limitless beat potential this weekend.’
    • ‘Before these larger clubs came on the scene, there already was music being played here.’
    • ‘They are not an option at any decent night club (many clubs nowadays have stricter dress codes than some offices).’
    • ‘This collection features only the songs that created the disco scene in the clubs of early 1970s New York.’
    • ‘Live music thumps out of the bars and clubs, a music scene that has produced artists as varied as The Undertones and Dana.’
    • ‘However, their club scene took off and they went from strength to strength.’
    • ‘This is a representation of the club scene; I love the gold lamé trousers!’
    • ‘For the most part I have felt welcomed by the male DJs from the club and rave scenes.’
    • ‘It is also the ideal spot for teenagers who love lying out on the beach and then hitting the amusement park and the pubs and clubs at night.’
    • ‘They have a new night that promises to rehabilitate the northern club scene, go check it out!’
    • ‘May we have a definite decision on the policy of opening hours for the clubs, bars and night spots?’
    • ‘One analyst of the afterhours scene thinks the clubs should be encouraged rather than attacked.’
    • ‘When the band finishes the stage is quickly cleared, and the club night starts in earnest.’
    • ‘They do like to go for it on a night out, hence our vibrant club culture.’
    • ‘The small town businesses were closing up and letting the clubs and hot spots take over the night shift.’
    • ‘This music revolution seems to have had great effect on the local club scene, or has it really?’
    • ‘When the chance came up again to run one of London's big clubs, ego replaced common sense.’
    nightclub, night spot, disco, discotheque, cabaret club, supper club, bar
    View synonyms

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1club togetherBritish Combine with others so as to collect a sum of money for a particular purpose.

    ‘friends and colleagues clubbed together to buy him a present’
    • ‘It sounded like the pair of them were trying to club together to buy a bag of chips and get a taxi home.’
    • ‘I often encourage them to club together to buy a particular wine if they want to taste it.’
    • ‘I asked if we could club together to pay the fee and was told no.’
    • ‘Alternatively, club together with a bunch of mates and rent a superb seafront villa in Ibiza.’
    • ‘They clubbed together and bought a collective gravestone.’
    • ‘The scheme encourages residents to club together to raise money to install gates at the entrance of alleyways.’
    • ‘Instead, the borough's mayor is urging schools, churches and voluntary groups to club together and make sure lonely elderly people still enjoy Christmas cheer.’
    • ‘A team of oxen at ploughing time was vital and a village might club together to buy one or two and then use them on a rota basis.’
    • ‘Cleaners working early hours would often club together and order a private-hire car.’
    • ‘Traders decided to club together to fund a promotion aimed at presenting a better image of the area.’
    • ‘We should really club together and get them the latest album.’
    • ‘Many retailers are giving a discount on six or more bottles, so it also makes economic sense to club together with friends or family.’
    • ‘They have to drop their parochial attitude, club together and shape their own futures.’
    • ‘Shortly after I had got my guitar, Tony and I decided to club together and buy a proper amp.’
    • ‘The directors could club together to buy such an establishment but that is unlikely to go down well with the players.’
    • ‘Residents in blocks of flats had begun to club together to buy generators.’
    • ‘Some friends recently clubbed together to buy me a telescope for my 40th birthday, and I've had great pleasure from it.’
    • ‘Then I saw the staff club together to try to buy some gifts for the men and women who would be spending Christmas as patients on the ward.’
    • ‘If not the band will have to club together to buy a new set.’
    • ‘Businesses, friends and relatives have clubbed together to raise money to help his parents cope with the financial burden by setting up a special trust fund.’
    pool resources, make a kitty, join forces, make a joint contribution, divide costs, share costs
    View synonyms
  • 2informal Go out to nightclubs.

    ‘she enjoys going clubbing in Oxford’
    • ‘Saturday is all set to be the best night's clubbing of the year so far.’
    • ‘He needed to keep an eye on her, he'd decided earlier this evening, when he'd heard they were all going clubbing.’
    • ‘Had they been going clubbing, he would have been more appropriately dressed.’
    • ‘I've always found going clubbing mildly ridiculous, which probably added to the novelty of last night's outing.’
    • ‘I'm going to have some drinks, catch up with an old friend and do some clubbing.’
    • ‘The rest of the weekend was spent clubbing and not getting enough sleep.’
    • ‘She looks like someone who works in a bank and has a cool haircut for going clubbing on the weekend.’
    • ‘On the weekends she was likely to be hanging out with her friends, going clubbing at a nightclub or to a rock concert.’
    • ‘He said that the atmosphere was relaxed because it was a family resort, without much clubbing or loud music.’
    • ‘When I was about fifteen I started going clubbing.’
    • ‘Sit back for a moment and imagine a glamorous night of clubbing in Paris.’
    • ‘I'm going clubbing to put my newly found masculinity to the test.’
    • ‘The man himself got out of the driver's seat along with several other people, who were all dressed up for a night of clubbing.’
    • ‘Her new life, sharing digs with fellow models and going clubbing for the first time in her life, was a shock.’
    • ‘I'm staying in a hotel this time, to enjoy a Saturday night of clubbing.’
    • ‘This new age approach to clubbing is paying dividends, with the club turning away hundreds of people every weekend.’
    • ‘One of the true treasures in life is knowing the location of a late-night spot where you can get food after a night of clubbing.’
    • ‘I highly recommend this place to start off the night of clubbing.’
    • ‘The clubbing is really great, but there are also such beautiful places, like the Great Barrier Reef.’
    • ‘For good or ill, leisure developments, late night drinking and clubbing are part of the 21st century scene.’

Phrases

  • in the club (or the pudding club)

    • informal Pregnant.

      • ‘The last I heard of him was that his girlfriend was in the club and they left, leaving us alone again.’
      expecting a baby, having a baby, with a baby on the way, having a child, expectant, carrying a child
      View synonyms
  • join the club

    • informal in imperativeUsed as an observation that someone else is in a similar difficult situation to oneself.

      ‘if you're confused, join the club!’
      • ‘But if you're wondering what the hell I'm stammering about in the final minute, join the club!’
      • ‘So you see, when the Prime Minister says he could do with some co-operation, join the club, so could we.’

Origin

Early 17th century (as a verb): formed obscurely from club.

Pronunciation

club

/klʌb/

Main definitions of club in English

: club1club2

club2

noun

  • 1A heavy stick with a thick end, used as a weapon.

    ‘they beat him with a wooden club’
    • ‘Alongside bows and arrows, clubs seem to have been a favourite weapon.’
    • ‘Hundreds of hired thugs attacked a group of farmers in the village with hunting rifles, clubs and other weapons.’
    • ‘Wielding his weapon like a club he charged the remaining two guards and flung himself at them.’
    • ‘The security forces unleashed an immense barrage of teargas as well as using water cannon and clubs.’
    • ‘Between four and five men, armed with weapons including a shotgun and a club, broke into the secluded home early yesterday.’
    • ‘The situation escalated, with villagers attacking each other with clubs and other weapons.’
    • ‘Other researchers think that the head injuries resulted from fights using clubs or other weapons.’
    • ‘They also make their own canoes as well as fishing and hunting implements such as spears, clubs, blow guns, arrows, and darts.’
    • ‘Police said youth armed with machetes, knives, clubs and stones surrounded the building.’
    • ‘Militants wielding clubs and sticks chased the farmer into his house, demanding he leave the property.’
    • ‘Thugs came to my house wielding clubs and swords.’
    • ‘I saw an extremist mob with clubs and swords standing on the other side of the road.’
    • ‘Newspapers reported a fierce clash between troops and a group of hundreds of students armed with swords and wooden clubs.’
    • ‘In that incident, police used tear gas, clubs, heavy plastic shields and live ammunition against the protesters.’
    • ‘A 78-year-old woman sent a robber packing after she cracked him across the head with a wooden club.’
    • ‘Many of the arms were ‘low-tech weapons’ like studded clubs, knives and spears.’
    • ‘Ironically, guns have replaced knives and clubs as the weapons of choice among many criminals.’
    cudgel, truncheon, bludgeon, baton, stick, mace, staff, bat
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1
      short for golf club
      • ‘I also know that many golfers have already begun the season, but I'm just digging my clubs out of the garage.’
      • ‘I change my clubs quite a bit, depending on the type of golf course I'm playing.’
      • ‘To hit it higher I widen my stance, which lowers my hands and adds loft to the club.’
      • ‘Without some good common sense and a notion of how hard golf balls and clubs are, a golf course can be a very dangerous place.’
      • ‘He was so tired after holing the winning putt and putting the clubs away that they were not brought out again until Tuesday.’
      • ‘Also, most golfers slice, so they swing the club to the left in an attempt to compensate.’
      • ‘You don't have to invest in a complete set of clubs in the beginning.’
      • ‘I always use the same six clubs, working my way up from the sand wedge to the driver.’
      • ‘Rattle the clubs in your bag when the opponent is addressing a shot.’
      • ‘How much can a golfer have clubs lengthened or shortened to compensate for height?’
      • ‘Aim at a spot an inch or two behind the ball, take an upright backswing and drop the club on that spot.’
      • ‘What's clear, though, is that all you need to play it is three clubs: a driver, a wedge and a putter.’
      • ‘Then he hands the girls two clubs and two golf balls.’
      • ‘Anyone wishing to experience golf for the first time will receive one-hour of free coaching, when golf balls and clubs are also provided free.’
      • ‘This swing lets the loft of the club get the ball in the air the way it should.’
      • ‘There's a good selection of lightweight Sunday bags on the market, and you don't need to carry a full set of clubs.’
      • ‘I try to get the feeling that my left hand pushes the club away at the start of the backswing.’
      • ‘Every golfer is different, so the right 14 clubs for your buddy may not be right for you.’
      • ‘Dad eventually got me a set of second-hand clubs, and I've been playing ever since.’
      • ‘The key to good tempo is to keep the club speed the same during the backswing and the downswing.’
  • 2clubsOne of the four suits in a conventional pack of playing cards, denoted by a black trefoil.

    • ‘Whoever has the two of clubs (or diamonds if the clubs are trump) leads first.’
    • ‘For example if we are partners, we might agree that a bid of one club by me shows a strong hand, but has nothing to do with wanting clubs as trumps.’
    • ‘In other words, it is of the club suit and outranked by all other clubs.’
    • ‘The player with the higher of the two cards (ace of spades is highest, 2 of clubs lowest) will deal the cards for the next match.’
    • ‘The card much to her disappointment was the mere four of clubs.’
    • ‘As a wit summed it up: When there is no agreement as to which suit is trumps, clubs are always trumps.’
    • ‘Her cards are strong - she has the ace of diamonds, the ace and queen of clubs, the ace and king of hearts.’
    • ‘He had an ace and king of clubs, which meant I needed diamonds or tens.’
    • ‘Players should now sort out the cards according to suit hearts, clubs, etc.’
    • ‘The four of clubs is described by some as the Devil's bedstead and is loathed by many players, who claim that no good hand can include this card.’
    • ‘The player who was dealt the 2 of clubs is not allowed to discard it to the trump pile, since it must be led to the first trick.’
    • ‘At the same time, the card cheat is glancing furtively around to make sure no one is watching while he pulls an extra ace of clubs from his belt.’
    • ‘When 5 play it is necessary to take out two cards - the twos of clubs and diamonds.’
    • ‘My father also had an ace of hearts, an ace of clubs and the fifth card was a jack of spades.’
    • ‘The chief differences are that you must make an exact bid instead of a minimum bid, and clubs are trump.’
    • ‘She had only the Ace of clubs and the Jack of hearts.’
    • ‘The queen of clubs belongs for all purposes to the trump suit, not to the club suit.’
    • ‘For example if hearts are trumps, the jack of clubs is the highest heart, and has nothing whatever to do with the club suit.’
    • ‘He has, among other cards, an 8 of clubs.’
    • ‘I looked at the card and could hardly believe it - seven of clubs.’
    1. 2.1 A card of such a suit.
      • ‘If the turned up card is a club, then clubs are automatically trump.’
      • ‘Since player one now realizes that the other's card is not a club, he turns over all cards that aren't clubs.’
      • ‘Suppose its late in the game, and you have a lot of trumps, and 2 medium-to-high ranking clubs.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Beat (a person or animal) with a club or similar implement.

    ‘the islanders clubbed whales to death’
    • ‘Last August one diner clubbed another with a baseball bat when the latter intervened in a dispute over a missing cheeseburger.’
    • ‘They ran him through with their bayonets and clubbed him with iron bars.’
    • ‘Stragglers were shot and those that fell down exhausted were clubbed to death or left to die.’
    • ‘The animals were usually clubbed to death when they came ashore to breed.’
    • ‘A teenage security guard today spoke of his terror as he was repeatedly clubbed over the head with the handle of a gun by an armed robber.’
    • ‘Captured once, he escaped and survived another year before being clubbed to death.’
    • ‘The chicks are clubbed to death and then decapitated.’
    • ‘It appears that after Cook was wounded in the back, islanders clubbed him to death.’
    • ‘A young couple were robbed by thugs who clubbed the boyfriend with a wooden pole.’
    • ‘He struggled even harder against his bonds, until someone clubbed him in the back of the head.’
    • ‘Graphic images of seals being clubbed to death or shot helps sustain an international boycott on their fur.’
    • ‘There were reports that the police clubbed several women, though there were no hospital reports of injuries.’
    • ‘I reached for a rock and clubbed him from behind.’
    • ‘My fists balled, I clubbed the man on the back of the head, grabbing his keys as he fell.’
    • ‘But if the police clubbed this guy to death, I was determined to run into the alley and stop the violence.’
    • ‘I swung and clubbed him on the side of the jaw with the manacles, sending him tumbling.’
    • ‘She recalls seeing a kind looking elderly gentleman being clubbed to death by someone she recognized.’
    • ‘She was attacked from behind and probably never even saw the killer who clubbed her three times over the head with a rounded blunt instrument, possibly a hammer.’
    • ‘Personally, I think these practitioners should be clubbed over the head.’
    • ‘A security guard was in hospital today after gun-toting robbers clubbed him over the head in a raid on a supermarket.’
    cudgel, bludgeon, bash, beat with a stick, strike with a stick
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old Norse clubba, variant of klumba; related to clump.

Pronunciation

club

/klʌb/