Definition of clog in English:

clog

noun

  • 1A shoe with a thick wooden sole.

    • ‘The heels of her clogs clanking on the wooden desk floor, Matim Henoscil headed to a group of young ladies gathered near the railings.’
    • ‘His tiny souvenirs are scaled-down versions of traditional wooden clogs and feature hand-made soles, leather straps, tiny brass nails and metal toe plates.’
    • ‘Because unfortunately, I also chose to wear big, heavy clogs today.’
    • ‘He used to wear a pair of high wooden clogs called bokuba which were often worn in those days by students dressed in formal wear.’
    • ‘I used to imagine that I would wear white clogs to my wedding.’
    • ‘The chef and sous-chef wear Dansko clogs, which are rather handsome black leather clogs with thick soles.’
    • ‘We'd put our wooden clogs inside our jackets and sneak out the back barefooted so that O-Sensei would not notice.’
    • ‘Everything goes well until one critical day when the wooden clogs are no longer usable.’
    • ‘In most Wigan mines, though, the standard headgear was a woven scarf or shawl, the standard footwear the clog.’
    • ‘Vas slides his scrubbed-pink bare feet into a pair of leather and wooden clogs.’
    • ‘He wore an exceptionally tall red hat and wooden clogs.’
    • ‘Depending on the shape, style, and length of skirt, you can choose from boots, sandals, cool clogs, or classic pumps.’
    • ‘When we were liberated, we were almost naked, bereft of all possessions, clad in a prisoner's striped uniform and wooden clogs.’
    • ‘I noticed that, like every dentist I've visited in recent years, he was wearing clogs.’
    • ‘Traditional footwear is sandals or wooden clogs with a thong that passes between the big toe and the second toe.’
    • ‘But I used to show up in kimono and wooden clogs, looking like your typical impoverished student of those days.’
    • ‘He wore wooden clogs until the age of sixteen, as he did not have any shoes.’
    • ‘There I was clacking along the old Tokaido highway in my heavy wooden clogs.’
    • ‘Like a large number of people, I wore clogs in my early days of farm work.’
    • ‘Some places give you wooden clogs that can be an adventurous walk on wet marble floors.’
    sabot, wooden shoe, wooden-soled shoe
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  • 2An encumbrance or impediment.

    ‘they found the tax to be an unacceptable clog on the market’
    • ‘The familiar story of system clog may yet end up defeating the best efforts at joint parliamentary action on crime.’
    • ‘For any of the major types of clogs in the main system a heavy duty sewer snake should be used.’
    • ‘A clog is rarely in the trap and the chemical only helps open the drain a little bit.’

verb

  • 1Block or become blocked with an accumulation of thick, wet matter.

    [with object] ‘the gutters were clogged up with leaves’
    [no object] ‘too much fatty food makes your arteries clog up’
    ‘clogged drains’
    • ‘The dust kicked up in her face blinded her and clogged up her throat.’
    • ‘Whenever rains are heavy, the drain gets clogged with debris.’
    • ‘The float valve in the brine tank (inside plastic pipe) also can get clogged up with salt residue.’
    • ‘Within a few days, the heaviest rain for 30 years had turned the soil into a quagmire, producing thick mud that clogged up rifles and immobilised tanks.’
    • ‘A pump blockage in the existing system had caused the problem after clogged up waste poured out of an emergency outflow pipe.’
    • ‘Do you fear that you'll be clogged up with lots of very, very minor disputes, where people should be able to sort them out themselves?’
    • ‘It clogged up his throat and his chest and made his head ache.’
    • ‘Kevin's Kurdish driver, Adnan, had raced his engine and clogged up the carburetor of his Nissan.’
    • ‘The particulate matter in the rain water that ran off the roof clogged up my water filter, but otherwise this scare caused no damage.’
    • ‘At the outset, a solution to Bangalore's clogging drains can't be that simplistic.’
    • ‘When you finally get your turn in the bathroom, are you met with towels thrown on the floor and the toilet clogged up with reams of toilet roll?’
    • ‘And our attitude to debris and litter, clogging up drains, needs to change.’
    • ‘The chief told me that both the primary and the safety pressure regulators were clogged with debris.’
    • ‘He's just back from a fortnight in the city and is suffering from little more than clogged up sinuses.’
    • ‘The surface was like a thick clay which clogged up the tyre treads, turning them into slicks.’
    • ‘The buildup traps oil under skin, leading to more clogged pores and breakouts.’
    block, obstruct, congest, jam, choke, bung up, plug, silt up, stop up, seal, fill up, close
    gunge up
    occlude, obturate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Fill up or crowd (something) so as to obstruct passage.
      ‘tourists' cars clog the roads into Cornwall’
      • ‘Of immediate concern to us is the fact that our people fill the jails and clog the justice system.’
      • ‘The streets were clogged with tourists and pilots jostling for position amidst the sea of vendors and street urchins.’
      • ‘The next day, to get away from all the tourist buses clogging the narrow streets, I took refuge in a pretty little park I found.’
      • ‘"If not, they could be sued and that could clog up the courts," he said.’
      • ‘Side roads are clogged with cars avoiding the three-in-one rule.’
      • ‘A line of cars clogs the tree-lined street, engines idling in the sun.’
      • ‘Expensive cars clog the roads of the internationally recognised Greek Cypriot half of Nicosia.’
      • ‘The filters were completely clogged with plaster dust.’
      • ‘She cried out towards him but dust clogged her throat, and she barely got out a raspy whisper.’
      • ‘They clog the lane defensively and will create problems for U.S. star Tim Duncan.’
      • ‘The city streets and highways were clogged with buried cars and trucks for a week.’
      • ‘The Can-Spam Act was supposed to prevent unsolicited commercial e-mail from clogging your inbox.’
      • ‘The narrow streets are clogged with dinner crowds.’
      • ‘It will create ‘traffic chaos’ because of extra cars clogging the roads.’
      • ‘Traffic clogged major arteries in parts of the state.’
      • ‘Even the narrow passageways were clogged with piles of papers stuffed in among outworn printing presses.’
      • ‘The dust clogs my throat and the rocks hurt my feet, but I cannot rest.’
      • ‘We had so much equipment over there, at one point, it just clogged the roads and filled up a nearby church parking lot.’
      • ‘With so much spam clogging my email in-box, I couldn't survive any more without this program!’
      • ‘And if it is not spam clogging your inbox, it is viruses, worms and other nasties.’

Origin

Middle English (in the sense ‘block of wood to impede an animal's movement’): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

clog

/klɒɡ/