Main definitions of clinker in English

: clinker1clinker2

clinker1

noun

  • 1[mass noun] The stony residue from burnt coal or from a furnace.

    • ‘The sintered material is cooled to form cement clinker.’
    • ‘These small grayish black pellets are called clinker.’
    • ‘The company imported 33,000 tonnes of clinker to support the company's own production in order to maximise cement production.’
    • ‘I propose to reduce the customs duty on cement and clinkers from 25% to 20%.’
    • ‘In addition, the plant has 11 air cannons installed on the clinker cooler.’
    • ‘Holcim also has placed an order with IKN to upgrade the two clinker coolers at the Dundee, Mich. plant.’
    • ‘We cool the clinker, add a bit of gypsum to control setting time, and crush the mixture into a fine powder.’
    • ‘Cement and clinker imports play an important role in supplementing domestic capacity constraints.’
    • ‘The building can store as much as 400,000 tons of clinker.’
    • ‘Another is a rounded piece of clinker, a porous material that results from the burning of coal seams.’
    • ‘Thirdly, reduce the clinker content in cement, by intergrinding cementious material like slag, fly ash, or limestone.’
    • ‘Cement and clinker imports declined 6.5 percent in 2002, according to a recent PCA report.’
    • ‘The expected decrease of duty on cement and clinker from Rs 400 per tonne to Rs 350 per tonne didn't happen.’
    • ‘To the extent possible, the concrete mixture should incorporate Portland cement of one type, made with clinker from a single source, and manufactured at the same plant.’
    • ‘With additional analysis of shipping market development, the study also includes detailed appraisals of cement and clinker imports and exports.’
    • ‘The department originally issued the antidumping order on gray Portland cement and clinker from Mexico in 1990.’
    • ‘The permitted operating capacity of the plant is 800,000 tons of clinker per year.’
    • ‘An electric three-roll crusher reduces 95% of the clinker to less than 35 mm in size.’
    • ‘The tremendous velocity of the particle-laden dust stream coupled with high temperatures coming off the clinker cooler rapidly eroded the elbow and standard-issue duct system.’
    • ‘At its peak the mix reaches 1, 450C before exiting as a hard, gritty material called clinker.’
    glowing coal, live coal
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[count noun]A brick with a vitrified surface.
      [as modifier] ‘clinker-brick walls’
      • ‘Remaindered brick packs - rough clinkers, chocolate browns, flash fired silvers - were placed randomly along the south elevation, to be laid as required.’
      • ‘Beneath the city's dense urban forest, low walls of Arroyo Seco stone and clinker brick front brown-shingled homes with porches set under graceful overhangs.’
      • ‘It will take about 1500 whole bricks, clinkers.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from obsolete Dutch klinckaerd (earlier form of klinker), from klinken to clink.

Pronunciation:

clinker

/ˈklɪŋkə/

Main definitions of clinker in English

: clinker1clinker2

clinker2

noun

informal
  • 1North American Something that is unsatisfactory, of poor quality, or a failure.

    ‘marketing couldn't save such clinkers as these films’
    • ‘Your own prior experience with a clinker marriage does count for something.’
    • ‘He conducted wedding services, and when some of the marriages hit clinkers, he was a patient, extraordinarily attentive family counselor.’
    • ‘So, updates will come a little quicker now, this was the clinker.’
    • ‘Every talented author is entitled to the occasional clinker.’
    • ‘I was in the movie business, did some good movies, did a couple of clinkers.’
    • ‘Luckily, the duo doesn't settle on such clinkers.’
    • ‘Anyway Marron made it two with another clinker.’
    • ‘If that was the high point in the series, which Oregon leads 52-41-10, then the real clinker was the 1983 scoreless tie.’
    failure, disappointment, let-down, loser, non-achiever, ne'er-do-well
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A wrong musical note.
      ‘a string breaks, you hit a clinker, you forget where you are in a piece’
      • ‘Suddenly, I hit an obvious clinker with my right hand - a wrong note that had never happened before and that sounded pretty stupid.’
      • ‘It seemed to me that she wasn't traumatized at the end with the clinker.’
      • ‘After so many hits, the law of averages demanded a clinker from the Kennedy Center's Sondheim Celebration, and got it with A Little Night Music.’
  • 2British dated Something or someone excellent or outstanding.

    ‘she was a real clinker’

Origin

Late 17th century (denoting a person or thing that clinks): from clink + -er. clinker dates from the mid 19th century, clinker from the 1930s.

Pronunciation:

clinker

/ˈklɪŋkə/