Definition of Classico in English:

Classico

adjective

  • postpositive (of Italian wine) produced in the region from which the type takes its name, and thus of a higher standard than a regional wine without the designation.

    ‘Chianti Classico’
    • ‘But I also like the idea of heading straight for a Chianti Classico, made in the province of Tuscany from Sangiovese grapes.’
    • ‘To the northwest of the city is the Valpolicella Classico zone where most of the best vineyards are located.’
    • ‘Soave Classico and Valpolicella Classico come from the superior hillside vineyards and are usually far removed from the expressionless versions made from grapes grown on the valley floor.’
    • ‘The Chianti Classico wines have led the trend in richer and better-balanced wines.’
    • ‘It looked just like Orvieto Classico and tasted of nearly nothing.’
    • ‘We ordered a bottle of white wine, an Orvieto Classico, which at £9.95 was pricier than the house white, but worth the extra couple of quid.’
    • ‘To accompany these we drank a Barolo Classico 2000, which was decanted at the table.’
    • ‘Once these standards are met, the wine can be called Chianti Classico, and wear the seal of the Consortium.’
    • ‘Sensing a losing battle, they began to study maps and guidebooks over a shared bottle of Chianti Classico.’
    • ‘We stuck with the Chianti Classico, which went well with all our pasta dishes.’
    • ‘A waitress finally took our order and then we waited an age for a bottle of Verdicchio Classico at €15.’
    • ‘Oils produced in the Chianti Classico region of Tuscany have a new label of distinction: a black rooster, also seen on wine labels.’
    • ‘When Tuscany was being carved up everyone wanted to be in the Chianti or Chianti Classico region, as this was the best selling and most well regarded of Italian wines.’

Origin

Italian.

Pronunciation

Classico

/ˈklasɪkəʊ/