Definition of civil liberty in English:

civil liberty

noun

  • 1[mass noun] The state of being subject only to laws established for the good of the community, especially with regard to freedom of action and speech:

    ‘under Conservative rule civil liberty became seriously eroded’
    [as modifier] ‘civil liberty groups’
    • ‘The objectives include the defence and promotion of freedom of the press, broadcasting, speech and information, and the defence and promotion of peace, social justice and civil liberty.’
    • ‘Now that's a version of depleted civil liberty too.’
    • ‘Since then the calls for a royal commission have quietened somewhat but lawyers, academics and civil liberty groups maintain the State Government's solution is inadequate and problematic.’
    • ‘This is the common-sense notion that civil liberty must always be balanced against other societal interests, such as a nation's security.’
    • ‘But the six-page summary report does not address the frustration that has been expressed by civil liberty advocates, defense lawyers and the families of prisoners.’
    • ‘The existing law about involuntary commitment is the result of a long dialectic between an attitude of paternalism toward the mentally ill and ideals of personal freedom and civil liberty.’
    • ‘‘Reducing civil liberty and justice for individuals does not secure safety for society,’ she concluded.’
    • ‘Sound money systems are essential to civil liberty, real freedom, and private property rights, including real estate.’
    • ‘We need to develop substantive policies that consider both civil liberty and public health protection as equally valued national priorities.’
    • ‘‘Defence of civil liberty and justice for all our community are not mutually exclusive but inseparable,’ he told conference delegates.’
    • ‘Corporate corruption and civil liberty attacks can't do that.’
    • ‘But Native leaders, human rights advocates and civil liberty experts say the changes didn't go nearly far enough.’
    • ‘This new natural-rights view of civil liberty later inspired both the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights.’
    • ‘If the decision is made after hostilities have ceased, it is more likely to favor civil liberty than if made while hostilities continue.’
    • ‘The four of us who will be voting against this legislation have some very serious civil liberty concerns about it.’
    • ‘In this collection of columns and occasional essays, she offers a passionate defense of civil liberty.’
    • ‘The core value of constitutionalism, enshrined in the conception of a limited government, is to limit the State power, to prevent it from eroding civil liberty.’
    • ‘This is excellent news and a triumph for civil liberty and freedom of choice.’
    • ‘Lawyers and civil liberty groups say sunlight is the best disinfectant.’
    • ‘Before imposing democratic regimes, therefore, we should ensure that civil liberty is properly entrenched in a rule of law, a rotation of offices, and the freedom to dissent.’
    1. 1.1civil liberties A person's rights to be subject only to laws established for the good of the community:
      ‘growing threats to our civil liberties’
      • ‘Most of our contemporary ideas about freedom of speech and civil liberties come from the Enlightenment.’
      • ‘The same sort of thing is true for academic freedom; it's no more absolute than is the civil liberty of free speech.’
      • ‘There's no need for extra measures that bypass basic human rights and attack civil liberties.’
      • ‘By then his passionate concern for civil liberties and justice before the law was entrenched.’
      • ‘Traditionally, the common law has provided some protection for civil liberties.’
      • ‘It has forced compromises on freedoms and eroded civil liberties in many ways.’
      • ‘I am still naive enough that I'd like our country run on a basis of free speech and civil liberties.’
      • ‘The title of this book refers to both civil liberties and human rights.’
      • ‘This bill is an infringement of our civil liberties, our rights of trade.’
      • ‘The station has also involved itself in civil rights and civil liberties issues.’
      • ‘It ended Gandhi's emergency legislation, and restored civil liberties and free speech.’
      • ‘The assault on civil liberties and human rights did not end with the end of the Emergency.’
      • ‘It marks a major escalation in the assault on civil liberties and democratic rights.’
      • ‘As a result, both socioeconomic rights and civil liberties are being destroyed.’
      • ‘Let alone that he'd already demonstrated his commitment to civil liberties and freedom as a Governor.’
      • ‘They are shared by the otherwise opposed law-and-order and civil liberties lobbies.’
      • ‘This show trial is a serious threat to basic civil liberties and democratic rights.’
      • ‘After all, free speech - our core civil liberty - includes the right to receive public, non-confidential information.’
      • ‘The power of judicial review has allowed the Supreme Court to protect civil liberties within America.’
      • ‘If we do not take vigorous and rapid action we are going to have every civil liberty legislated away from us and a police state dictating our every move within a couple of decades.’
      independence, freedom, autonomy, sovereignty, self government, self rule, self determination, home rule
      View synonyms

Pronunciation:

civil liberty

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