Main definitions of choke in English

: choke1choke2

choke1

verb

  • 1no object (of a person or animal) have severe difficulty in breathing because of a constricted or obstructed throat or a lack of air.

    ‘Willie choked on a mouthful of tea’
    • ‘He whirled her around, his face barely inches from hers; Liz nearly choked on his horrid breath, which reeked of tobacco and alcohol.’
    • ‘He nearly choked on the toast that he was shoving down his throat, he was so nervous.’
    • ‘Fire brigade spokesman Laurent Vibert said the four victims choked to death on the fumes of the fire as they tried to escape from their rooms to the roof of the hotel.’
    • ‘A WOMAN choked to death in front of her horrified husband after a mouthful of Indian curry ‘went down the wrong way’, an inquest heard.’
    • ‘And the mother of the bride almost choked on her salmon sandwich.’
    • ‘The word caught in my throat, and I nearly choked on it.’
    • ‘I drunkenly choked on the beer I was drinking at the time and felt suddenly sexually unsure about not only men in general but women in general as well.’
    • ‘But my parents used to run a restaurant and when I was a very small child one of their customers choked on a fish bone.’
    • ‘She woke, and as the cry died in her throat, she almost choked on it.’
    • ‘She nearly choked on the sob welling up in her throat and felt the tears brimming in her eyes.’
    • ‘I almost choked on my coffee (or I would have done, if I was a coffee drinker).’
    • ‘But, just hours after she left, Wainwright called emergency services in a panic, saying Joshua had choked on his own vomit and had stopped breathing.’
    • ‘Dima smiled and grabbed Coral by his shirt collar, dragging so close to her that he almost choked on her rancid breath.’
    • ‘I almost choked on the tandoori chicken, then proceeded to finish it off in haste and headed to the Hostel 9 common room.’
    • ‘I nearly choked on my shock, the meaning of that song taking on proportions I hadn't fathomed.’
    • ‘Alex's voice got stuck in her throat and she nearly choked on nothing.’
    • ‘Despite yo-yo balls being examined and passing British safety standards, there have been a number of recent incidents where children have almost choked to death.’
    • ‘My heart leapt into my throat and I practically choked on it.’
    • ‘When I read this I almost choked on my bacon and egg pizza.’
    • ‘My friend's grandmother choked to death on a coconut bun.’
    gag, retch, cough, struggle for air, fight for breath, gasp
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object Cause (a person or animal) to choke.
      ‘the toys contained parts that could choke a very young child’
      • ‘When she'd come home from California in tears, he'd nearly flown out there to choke the person responsible with his bare hands.’
      • ‘The dog snapped its jaws open and closed inches from Rae's face and he could smell the animal's fetid breath, choking him, causing him to gag.’
      • ‘His breath stank so bad of Jack Daniels that it was choking me.’
      • ‘Then three officers carried me to a van, choking me on the way so that I couldn't breathe, much less yell.’
      • ‘The two scuffled, falling to the ground, and the officer was overpowered by the suspect who began choking him from behind.’
      • ‘They were stunned; they'd never thought their precious boy could harm a fly, let alone choke another person.’
      • ‘Between the three they managed to choke Snake enough that he quit moving.’
      • ‘Sometimes referred to as a chain or choke chain collar, if used properly it should never choke your dog.’
      • ‘The air was knocked out of him and as his father began choking him, Dante struggled to breath and get his father off of him at the same time.’
      • ‘The tilapia's numerous small bones can choke its predators, even the egret, which can swallow all other fish.’
      • ‘Her milk was flowing straight into her baby's lungs, turning him blue and choking him as he fought to breathe.’
      • ‘It has entered my bloodstream and is systematically choking me to death.’
      • ‘Smoke entered her lungs with every breath she took, choking her and blinding her further as it caused tears to form in her eyes.’
      • ‘Even as I tried to dodge thunder exploded in my face, burning pain and another hammer and dirt and dust was choking me while I gasped for a breath that wouldn't come.’
      • ‘I could hardly breathe, and every breath was choking me.’
      • ‘The riders crouched on the backs of the horses and the bandannas prevented the kicked - up dust from choking the brothers.’
      • ‘But it is perfectly humane, especially if you fall into the category of those who can't stop choking their dogs with the choke-chain collar.’
      • ‘Hercules killed the animal by choking it with his bare hands and thereafter wore its skin.’
      • ‘I would wake up fighting and trying to prevent someone from choking me.’
      • ‘However, after about an hour, a calf was choked to death due to an accident in feeding her milk.’
      suffocate, asphyxiate, smother, stifle
      strangle, throttle
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2choke something downwith object Swallow something with difficulty.
      ‘I attempted to choke down supper’
      • ‘Instead, he coughed, choked it down, and then shook himself to recover.’
      • ‘Then its jaw snapped shut on the body, and choked it down.’
      • ‘He got friendly with the cooks at the dorm eatery and told them if they made him a pound of bacon every morning, he'd choke it down every day.’
      • ‘Somehow gagging in between each bite, I managed to choke the bread down.’
      • ‘He had soon managed to choke the stuff down, threw his bowl into a large wooden tub at the corner of the room and strapped on his belt and sheath.’
      • ‘As she dribbles halfmud from a closed fist held above his mouth, he chokes it down.’
      • ‘She shoved the green plastic spoon in his mouth and smiled as he choked it down.’
      • ‘She choked the black liquid down, and asked for another.’
      • ‘He picked them up and choked them down one at a time.’
      • ‘Amaiya finally choked her food down and comforted Bonobos habitually.’
      • ‘Many bodybuilders cook up to a dozen chicken breasts at a time, choking them down over a period of days.’
      • ‘She choked it down then grabbed for her glass of water.’
      • ‘She measured out two tablespoons of Pepto Bismol and forced herself to choke it down.’
      • ‘The Reds could have offered a bowl of chili and a Schoenling beer, and Gillick would've had to choke it down.’
      • ‘She choked it down along with her revulsion, hoping for a clear head that would save her.’
      • ‘After a year or so I could hardly choke the stuff down any more.’
      • ‘I choked it down and answered her that yes, I was.’
    3. 1.3with object Prevent (a plant) from growing by depriving it of light, air, or nourishment.
      ‘the bracken will choke the wild gladiolus’
      • ‘Let us tend to our gardens with diligence, and keeping the weeds from choking the plants!’
      • ‘Some seed fell among weeds, and the weeds grew up and choked it.’
      • ‘Over a decade later, Schmid's film makes clear that for the vast majority of Germans weeds in the garden have long since choked any budding flowers.’
      • ‘In a SAC area if a farmer wishes to kill off the ivy that is choking his trees or menacing his buildings, he is not free to do so.’
      • ‘In most of the urban areas, the avenue trees are choked to death as the tree base is completely covered by concrete slabs, leaving little space for aeration.’
      • ‘She wants me to help her prune the rose bushes, dig out the carpet grass that is choking them.’
      • ‘Back home in England he grew a garden of weeds and saw which weeds choked others and counted population changes amongst weeds.’
      • ‘To keep plants from being choked, you often have to adjust ties as they grow.’
      • ‘‘We knew the immature trees would not survive as they would be choked by the thick growth of weeds and grass in the area,’ Mr Gell said.’
      • ‘The increased growth of woody vines could dramatically alter future forests - for instance, by choking new tree growth.’
      • ‘Could you suggest a strategy for choking the weeds and getting the field to a pure stand of timothy or a mixture good for horses?’
    4. 1.4with object Prevent or inhibit the occurrence or development of.
      ‘higher rates of interest choke off investment demand’
      • ‘That, in turn, could mean still-higher interest rates, which could choke off growth.’
      • ‘Many existing small businesses were choked out by the kudzulike growth of the new economy.’
      • ‘By raising prices at this crucial point, OPEC could be choking off the economic growth needed to keep demand robust.’
      • ‘High taxes choke off growth, but so do high deficits.’
      • ‘Apart from choking growth in Germany, this increase had the unwelcome consequence of launching the euro at an inappropriately high level.’
      • ‘Likewise, there could a pressure on inflation if oil prices continue to spurt in the global market, which in turn would choke the growth prospects.’
      • ‘Nonetheless, more of us should know that approaching a problem systematically and logically is not a weed that chokes creativity.’
      • ‘‘This will no doubt become a factor choking the future development of the local real estate market,’ Hua said.’
      • ‘Another commonly held belief among members of the analyst community is that high oil prices will choke off economic growth.’
      • ‘The true oppressor which chokes our potential for growth is the ego.’
      • ‘The noxious weed of clericalism has choked the development of a people's church.’
      • ‘This is the performance of an economy where business investment and growth have been choked by ever increasing regulation and where interest rates have had to be raised in response to a house price bubble.’
      • ‘It is literally choking our economic growth in this now $12 trillion economy.’
      • ‘The question now is whether rising rates will cool down the hotter parts of the economy without choking off general growth.’
      • ‘Though moderate income inequality may help sustain economic growth, drastic income inequality can choke it off.’
      • ‘The Fed must be careful in raising interest rates for the very simple reason that by moving too quickly, it can choke off growth.’
      • ‘The present growth of knowledge will choke itself off until we get different tools.’
      • ‘Treasury is telling him that if the rate of increase in the public sector continues, it has the potential to choke off economic growth.’
      • ‘It is changing the lives and futures of more than 3,000 young New Zealanders, and filling the skills gaps that threaten to choke economic growth.’
    5. 1.5informal no object (in sports) fail to perform at a crucial point of a game or contest as a result of nervousness.
      ‘we were the only team not to choke when it came to the crunch’
      • ‘It is beyond doubt that Ganguly's boys have, more often than not, choked in the final, what with their famed batting line-up coming to nought when it comes to the crunch.’
      • ‘The Raiders and Eagles, the so-called favorites because of their top seedings, will choke.’
      • ‘The common thinking is Bonds will hit his 65th homer, watch in horror as the media arrive by the hundreds and choke and fall short of 70.’
      • ‘In fact, he was at a speaking engagement once, and someone asked him about our games, and he said, ‘Joe's a good player, but he chokes.’’
      • ‘I couldn't root for the Giants there, but I was happy to see him shed his lingering reputation for postseason choking.’
      • ‘It's hard to say this, but just at the time we hoped you would shine under the bright lights of NBC, ESPN, and ABC, you choked.’
      • ‘For years, Olson presided over talented teams that were notorious for choking in big games.’
      • ‘The Eagles are another team I predicted would choke, and they haven't thus far.’
      • ‘If the champs choked in Pittsburgh, it would be the end of their 1912 championship bid.’
      • ‘What they must do now is shut out the voices accusing them of choking in this tournament and realise that the past month has demonstrated strength, not weakness.’
      • ‘There was about ten minutes to go at Prenton and I went through one-on-one with the keeper and basically I choked.’
      • ‘The best and worst matches, the finest players, the stars who choked… and the man who played without a putter.’
      • ‘When they choke, most athletes prefer that no one notices, that the world sees it as a defeat unbesmirched by an inner surrender.’
      • ‘Common wisdom had it that the table-topping Rhinos would once again choke on the big occasion.’
      • ‘Mundy, however, had choked when the title was agonisingly close… on the 18th hole.’
      • ‘And Paul dismissed talk of the Rhinos being doomed to choke.’
      • ‘When it came time for Phil to really coach and tame the egos of Shaq and Kobe, he choked.’
      • ‘After the miss, someone asked Murphy if Price choked.’
      • ‘Federer got away in the end after Nadal choked, but the latter will be richer for the experience.’
  • 2with object Fill (a space) so as to make movement difficult or impossible.

    ‘the roads were choked with traffic’
    • ‘Every green space is choked with discarded cans of Coors Light, wads of toilet paper, Frito-Lay bags.’
    • ‘A sunken garden to the west of the house was choked with untrimmed plants, its sunken pool brown and stagnant.’
    • ‘Roads into the village were choked with traffic heading for the ever-popular event, which lined The Borough from end to end.’
    • ‘Go often to the house of a friend, for weeds choke the unused path.’
    • ‘Litter cluttered the landscape, and vegetation choked the trails.’
    • ‘A factory worker's family spent a quiet evening at home, all dressed up, in a parlour choked with ornamental plants, under a great silk lampshade.’
    • ‘‘The area is already choked with traffic but there is no solution to that in these plans,’ said Mr. Mayling.’
    • ‘The town is choked with traffic daily and the situation on the Northern bank holiday weekend really put the tin hat on things.’
    • ‘Weeds choked the ground, as a light snow began to fall.’
    • ‘‘Think of a shallow stream choked with plants, not of an open sea,’ he said.’
    • ‘The banks were choked with willow and tamarisk, which I occasionally had to crawl under on my belly.’
    • ‘The town's roads are choked with traffic, leading to frequent jams during the busy tourist season.’
    • ‘The roads are choked with traffic, including enormous trucks transporting goods.’
    • ‘The path had been so choked with weeds it was virtually impassable.’
    • ‘Aquatic plants grow faster than anything else, and most types will soon choke your pool.’
    • ‘The landscape is choked with impenetrable forests of enormous trees and dense, green foliage.’
    • ‘Now small seedlings grew everywhere about the yard and weeds choked the gardens.’
    • ‘The mountains of litter choking the city confirm that not all is well with the local authority in as far as improving the status is concerned.’
    • ‘The back room was choked with old carpets, old clothes, mould, mushrooms and unfamiliar smells.’
    • ‘The town is choked with traffic and people cannot effectively run their businesses.’
    clog, clog up, bung up, block, obstruct, stop up, silt up, plug, dam up
    View synonyms
  • 3with object Make (someone) speechless with a strong feeling or emotion.

    ‘he was choked with fury’
    • ‘The veterans are composed and professional in the fierce heat, but Simon's voice is choked with emotion.’
    • ‘He knows when to make me cry, when that lump in my throat is choking me and I am unable to release my emotions.’
    • ‘When she spoke again, her voice was choked with emotion and unshed tears.’
    • ‘His bushy brow furrowing, Zethus peered after them speechlessly, choked by his disbelief.’
    • ‘I got out of the room before the thickness of my own emotion and attitude could choke me.’
    • ‘At the funeral mass all his young friends were choked with emotion as all the beautiful tributes were read out.’
    • ‘The story is told without frills and if you find yourself choking with emotion practically all the way through, it doesn't feel faked.’
    • ‘The unmistakable, overwhelming miasma of emotion that choked him and even threatened to stifle Rena too… it was guilt.’
    • ‘Talking about her daughter, Marion is clearly choked with emotion but she praises the family, friends and neighbours who have done their best to keep her going since the accident in March.’
    • ‘The words choked me and I was lost in a frenzy of emotions.’
    • ‘But there were tears in my eyes and I couldn't finish it because I got so emotionally choked, and I just had to sit down.’
    • ‘She was staring at the sign, and a flood of emotion choked her so that she could barely breathe.’
    • ‘In an emotionally choked voice, Mr. Bilheimer said half the people who figured in the film were already dead.’
    • ‘People were choked with emotion from the start; they had come back to the spot where they had seen brothers, sisters, parents and friends die.’
    1. 3.1usually be choked up Cause (someone) to feel tearful or extremely upset.
      ‘I was so choked up I started crying and couldn't sing any more’
      no object ‘I just choked up reading it’
      • ‘He showed emotion, choking up at times, stopping to take off his glasses and wipe his eyes.’
      • ‘It was an overwhelming, mournful piece then when the city was still in shock; yesterday, I found myself choking up repeatedly and involuntarily as I walked around it.’
      • ‘We're getting all choked up just thinking about it.’
      • ‘I find that I can field strip a deer without remorse yet I still get choked up when I watch ‘Bambi.’’
      • ‘The show ended up being quite surreal, particularly when after My Coco, the crowd would not stop cheering, seemingly choking up the band and the few longtime fans in the audience.’
      • ‘And you guys have been so generous I get choked up when I think about it.’
      • ‘He was suddenly choked up with emotion and tears welled in his eyes.’
      • ‘C'mon, I dare you to listen without choking up just a little.’
      • ‘When I returned to class I was so overwhelmed at their thoughtfulness I choked up for the first time in front of my students and couldn't speak.’
      • ‘He was obviously choked up and didn't know what to do about it, being of that age when men didn't cry.’
      • ‘He gave a warm, wonderful eulogy for Aunt Jo and choked up enough a couple of times that he had to stop and gather himself.’
      • ‘Two years after losing my best friend to leukemia, I could finally smile at all the memories, instead of choking up.’
      • ‘Glick, who had four months left on his three-year hitch, choked up and sniffled when he read a statement asking for mercy.’
      • ‘His delivery was choppy, halting now and then, as if he were choking up, on the verge of tears.’
      • ‘It's the only wedding I've been to (out of a medium-two-digit number) where the groom got choked up.’
      • ‘Franken choked up repeatedly as he related the stories involving his father, whom he obviously loved.’
      • ‘I couldn't call any more of them to say thanks, being a bit choked up.’
      • ‘He choked up while describing a little boy who had been deceived by a charlatan faith healer.’
      • ‘I still get choked up listening to it and it's been, like, seven years.’
      • ‘I'll admit I got a little choked up at the part in the end where he said, ‘I just want people to be happy.’’
    2. 3.2 Suppress a strong emotion or the expression of such an emotion.
      ‘Liz was choking back her anger’
      • ‘He swallows as if choking back some kind of retort, then forces a laugh.’
      • ‘I was having trouble choking back the hysterical screams that wanted to arise from my throat, as well.’
      • ‘Cici's anger was choked back when she saw his eyes.’
      • ‘Violet rushed over, choking back a scream of instinctive terror.’
      • ‘She hugged her knees to her chest, choking back her sobs.’
      • ‘I spit out the last bit of toothpaste in my mouth, choking back more tears.’
      • ‘By the end, you are left, like the lady from Flint, choking back tears of pain and fury.’
      • ‘After climbing down the ladder, I stood standing in the tunnel choking back my tears.’
      • ‘She frowned, choking back her spilling tears in disbelief.’
      • ‘Love wasn't supposed to be this hard, she thought, choking back a sob.’
      • ‘Check the link and you'll see a picture of the ol Sar'major choking back a couple tears.’
      • ‘I closed my eyes, choking back the feeling of utter disgust.’
      • ‘With a quick burst of theatrical grace she pushed past Kelley and ran back upstairs, choking back the ‘tears’.’
      • ‘His voice sounded shaky, like he was choking back tears, but once he caught his bearings, he pressed his palm softly to my hair and bent to kiss my cheek.’
      • ‘Yacob bit his lip in mid-protest, effectively choking back whatever crass words he would have used.’
      • ‘I explained everything that happened while choking back the tears.’
      • ‘Daphne was choking back the urge to start sobbing uncontrollably.’
      • ‘I could hear him on the other line, choking back his tears.’
      • ‘For the first time she had to choke back emotion, tears forming around her eyes.’
      • ‘The answer is nothing, but even if there was something to say, it would not have been able to come out of my mouth because I was choking back tears.’
      suppress, hold back, fight back, bite back, gulp back, swallow, check, keep in check, restrain, contain, control, repress, smother, stifle, curb, bridle, rein in
      View synonyms
  • 4with object Enrich the fuel mixture in (a petrol engine) by reducing the intake of air.

    ‘carbon monoxide results during a cold start, when an engine is choked’

noun

  • 1A valve in the carburettor of a petrol engine that is used to reduce the amount of air in the fuel mixture when the engine is started.

    ‘an automatic choke’
    mass noun ‘too much choke does not help’
    • ‘If the vehicle sees cold, hot, wet, and dry duty as well as on-track action, the carb should have a choke and vacuum secondaries.’
    • ‘TKS uses a redesigned carburetor with an automatic fuel enrichment system instead of a traditional choke.’
    • ‘A special wrench quickly screws the chokes in and out.’
    • ‘They are used in a wide variety of applications, including throttle cables, emergency brakes, chokes and air intakes.’
    • ‘It can't be the choke, as it doesn't rev that high when it's out fully.’
    1. 1.1 A knob which controls the choke in a carburettor.
      ‘he pulled the choke out to its full extent’
      • ‘The motorist is advised to use the choke briefly only when absolutely necessary.’
      • ‘I'd rather have a manual choke than an automatic choke, though.’
      • ‘Indeed, even if you drove an old Mini everywhere in first gear with the choke full out and the handbrake on, you barely saw the inside of a petrol station from one year to the next.’
      • ‘They would opt to have their vehicles maintained and repaired, resulting in an increased demand for spare parts including tires, batteries, and chokes.’
      • ‘Anyway, so I do other stuff, and then leave the house at the time I supposed to be there, after cursing the person who moved my car but stopped the engine with the choke out.’
    2. 1.2 A narrowed part of a shotgun bore near the muzzle, serving to restrict the spread of the shot.
      ‘many guns may not have the right choke’
      ‘a full choke gun’
      • ‘The tight choke should provide good shots out to 50 yards.’
      • ‘For most 12-gauges shooting lead shot, turkey chokes have IDs of.665 -.640.’
      • ‘Because hard steel shot lacks the easy flowing characteristics of lead shot through forcing cones and tight chokes, older guns could not handle it without some damage to their barrels.’
      • ‘When you're buying a used shotgun or a shotgun without removable chokes, don't believe the choke designation on any barrel until it has been measured with a bore gauge.’
      • ‘The idea was that the game would be further out for the second or third shot and a tighter choke would be advantageous.’
    3. 1.3 An inductance coil used to smooth the variations of an alternating current or to alter its phase.
      • ‘Mobile phones, computers, electronic chokes and a model helicopter are some of the things that will be dismantled and assembled for the children.’
      • ‘The HX1148 module features a centre-tapped inductor on the transmit channel for the most EMI-sensitive applications, while the HX1178 has both chokes on the media side.’
      • ‘They are widely used in transformers for the electrical power industry and for transformers, chokes, and other components in the electronics industry.’
  • 2An act or the sound of a person or animal having difficulty in breathing.

    ‘a little choke of laughter’
    • ‘He laughed softly, the sound more like a choke than a pleasurable noise.’
    • ‘The light shone over the man's features, and Connolly breathed a horrible choke.’
    • ‘Brianna suppressed a choke of laughter as the two boys stumbled into the room and hastily shut the door.’
    • ‘But her tears were not escorted with chokes or quick breaths, like before.’
    • ‘His breath was disconnected into sudden gasps and chokes.’
    • ‘Chelsea gave a choke of laughter, almost tripping in the process.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old English ācēocian (verb), from cēoce (see cheek).

Pronunciation

choke

/tʃəʊk/

Main definitions of choke in English

: choke1choke2

choke2

noun

  • The inedible mass of silky fibres at the centre of a globe artichoke.

    • ‘With a sharp silver teaspoon scrape out the choke, which would later have become the beautiful purple flower if left on the bush.’
    • ‘Beat the artichokes gently with your hand so that they open just enough for you to see if there is any choke.’
    • ‘Cut the artichokes in half and remove the hairy inner choke and any hard leaves, leaving only the tender base.’

Origin

Late 17th century: probably a confusion of the ending of artichoke with choke.

Pronunciation

choke

/tʃəʊk/