Main definitions of chippy in English

: chippy1chippy2

chippy1

noun

British
informal
  • 1A fish-and-chip shop:

    ‘there used to be a good chippy down the back of Albert Street’
    • ‘The shop is the first chippy in the borough to get the Heartbeat Award, given by the council to firms which try to help reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.’
    • ‘And about 10 years ago we used to have a pie shop, a chippy on the street and others around here before they closed down.’
    • ‘I can still clearly remember getting a fish supper from the Philadelphia chippie around the corner.’
    • ‘The chippy's more unusual offerings - queen scallops, squid rings and prawns - are all caught by Scottish boats and the staples, such as haggis and black pudding, from nearby suppliers.’
    • ‘Talking of pies, don't go to a chippie - go to a proper Northern bakery and get a custard or an Eccles cake while you are there.’
    • ‘He urged food lovers to vote for their favourite chippy while calling in to see for themselves once more how enjoyable freshly-cooked fish and chips really could be.’
    • ‘As it turns out, Jamie's friends don't head for the nearest chippy when they hear that they are to be on telly, for they are all big fat show-offs.’
    • ‘I'm off to Tynemouth tonight to sit and listen to the sea and read my book, while Patsy 123 either slaves over a hot stove or, more likely, goes to the chippy.’
    • ‘Even the general store, which doubles as a chippie, is tastefully minimalist and the lady who owns it has a heart that glows in the dark.’
    • ‘Forget the grey slabs that emerge from your freezer, or the grease-laden battered variety from the chippy; the Fife haddock is a breed apart.’
    • ‘Otherwise known as ‘Chip Alley’, it's a thoroughfare of chippies, kebab shops and pizza places that can diplomatically be described as ‘lively’ after the pubs shut.’
    • ‘Simon's shop and a chippy nearby have been targeted for months by a hard-core of about a dozen teenagers bent on making people's lives a misery.’
    • ‘There will be 1,400 new homes, new offices and shops - including restaurants, cafes, a bookie's and even a chippy.’
    • ‘That way you can visit the off licence, the sweet shop and the chippie without wasting energy.’
    • ‘The fact that the bride's best friend ‘works in a chippy in Colchester’ is one of many intriguing selling points for an unwanted wedding invitation which has been put on internet auction site E-Bay.’
    • ‘It follows a meticulous inspection of the chippy by Seafish watchdogs, who carried out about 200 separate checks, covering all aspects of the business, including 40 temperature checks.’
    • ‘There's also some other, classic London spots represented in the video (which features a rather scary factory robot) like the chippy on Berwick Street and Maida Vale tube.’
    • ‘We have two newsagents, a chippy and a Working Men's Club who stand to lose a lot of trade if York City goes.’
    • ‘Daddy dear, however, prefers the local chippy!’
    • ‘After cycling to Tobermory for an overnight stop and two unforgettable deep fried scallop suppers from the local chippy, we still have a thirst for more beaches.’
  • 2A carpenter.

    • ‘Just remember the chippy's golden rule: check your measurements twice before cutting.’
    • ‘The chippies also added skirtings, trimmings and painted the walls, giving the 1920s accommodation a real boost.’
    • ‘Take a trek to any building site and you'll see them being used by a variety of tradesmen including chippies, sparkies, painters and plumbers.’
    • ‘I asked them how many expected to get jobs carving, and how many actually thought they had an opportunity to get a job as a cabinetmaker, a joiner, or a chippy's labourer.’
    • ‘You can't get this standard of workmanship from the chippies on the site.’
    • ‘Warramunga's chippies built a new roof, a copy of the old.’

adjective

informal
  • 1(of a person) touchy and defensive, especially on account of having a grievance or a sense of inferiority:

    ‘I thought she was hostile and chippy’
    • ‘The tone in the first was very physical and the play was very chippy.’
    • ‘I think the argument here is that Scotland isn't significant enough for England to hate it, whereas, of course, England is significant enough to rile the chippy Scots.’
    • ‘He picked a fight with the undeserving rich on behalf of the deserving poor - and became wildly popular with Britain's wonderfully chippy middle class.’
    • ‘But why does Wilson feel himself to be so embattled that he needs to drop chippy asides?’
    • ‘Living on tick, Adam sees nothing for it but to hop back aboard the carousel of fashionable metropolitan parties, while the chippy envy-mongers of the press look on with fascinated horror.’
    • ‘He described Scotland as a nation rife with ‘corruption, a sense of inadequacy and, above all, a chippy jealousy of its bigger, richer, more outgoing neighbour’.’
    • ‘The main complaint appears to be traffic jams in the kingdom, with some rather chippy elves having to urge customers to get a move on to the next part of the Santa experience to keep the flow going.’
    • ‘His 13-year personal relationship with the vocalist of The Cocteaus, was on the rocks and his former drug and alcohol abuse was not making a naturally chippy personality any happier.’
    • ‘After every celebration of their maturity, they revert to gawky, chippy adolescents until the next time they put on a party for the world.’
    • ‘She is a hideous monstrosity and a small minded, chippy teenage rebel and I hope your fine lady wife forces you to sleep on the sofa for at least a week.’
    • ‘The chippy member from, I think, Otaki - I cannot remember his name - says that that is intended.’
    • ‘Without it I had cobbled together a half-baked credo of chippy self-sufficiency and an irritating need to be recognised.’
    • ‘As far as I can see, it's full of chippy weegies wearing cardies and bad shoes.’
    • ‘Back-seat strife was the most popular cause of arguments, together with chippy comments on driving skills or speed of travel.’
    • ‘Do not for a moment think this observation is motivated by a chippy dislike of public schools.’
    • ‘Like all good award divas (and chippy Scots), I hadn't expected to win and so it was a thrilling moment when they read out the Sunday Herald's name.’
    • ‘A younger person who starts out and behaves in a chippy way doesn't last long.’
    • ‘There is nothing chippy or adversarial about him, a passivity which might, to a lazy London casting director, seem at odds with his accent and his scar.’
    1. 1.1North American (of an ice-hockey game or player) rough and belligerent:
      ‘a chippy game’
      • ‘It was right on the edge of the area and there was definite contact, but the ref didn't penalise the chippy Irishman.’
      • ‘Washington will need Haywood to play a similar chippy role in this series.’
      • ‘While he won't win many popularity contests, Deadmarsh is respected around the league for his chippy play and will to win.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from chip + -y, -y; chippy is from the phrase a chip on one's shoulder.

Pronunciation:

chippy

/ˈtʃɪpi/

Main definitions of chippy in English

: chippy1chippy2

chippy2

(also chippie)

noun

informal
  • A prostitute or promiscuous young woman.

Origin

Late 19th century: of uncertain origin; perhaps from chip + -y, or from cheap.

Pronunciation:

chippy

/ˈtʃɪpi/