Definition of chief constable in English:

chief constable

noun

British
  • The head of the police force of a county or other region.

    • ‘A chief constable would sack a police officer for breaking the law.’
    • ‘The list of delegates included council chief executives, health officials, police chief constables and minority group leaders.’
    • ‘Damages are paid out of the police fund, not by the chief constable personally.’
    • ‘It must hold the chief constable and police service publicly to account.’
    • ‘Yesterday, the chief constable and the police authority issued a joint statement in a fresh bid to quell the outcry.’
    • ‘Neighbors soon learned that reporting policemen to their chief constables for unseemly conduct was an effective way to force police families to change their behavior or move.’
    • ‘Senior councillors, residents and police officers have welcomed the chief constable's statement.’
    • ‘Ministers also announced that foreign policemen would be able to become chief constables for the first time.’
    • ‘Scottish chief constables could take the initiative in their regions and could do that if they wanted to.’
    • ‘The local police authority battled to keep the chief constable in office until the last possible moment.’
    • ‘Residence is therefore a matter which goes to the jurisdiction of a particular chief constable in the exercise of his statutory powers.’
    • ‘The service was supported by all police staff associations in the UK with chief constables and police authority members in attendance.’
    • ‘A spokeswoman for Humberside police said the chief constable was in his office today in full uniform.’
    • ‘The responsibility for taking executive action on the intelligence remained with the Special Branch and the chief constables under the authority of the home secretary.’
    • ‘So he proposes to devolve most policing issues to newly elected local police authorities, with the independence of chief constables enshrined in statute.’
    • ‘I would love there to be more traffic police, but chief constables have to work within their budgets.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, the chief constable's vision for community policing across the county was given a warm welcome by forum members.’
    • ‘And if chief constables are given greater flexibility, we may well see police staff numbers grow at the expense of police officer numbers.’
    • ‘Copies of the study are now in the hands of all chief constables in Scotland, the Police College and the Scottish Police Federation.’
    • ‘A police magazine has been recalled after the chief constable said a cartoon on the front was offensive.’

Pronunciation

chief constable