Definition of chicane in English:

chicane

noun

  • 1A sharp double bend created to form an obstacle on a motor-racing track or a road:

    ‘the Austrian's car flew out of control and spun across the chicane’
    • ‘He also welcomed plans to stagger parking bays along the one-way road to create chicanes to slow vehicles.’
    • ‘It's just 10-15 seconds after braking at the two previous chicanes and the brakes are still hot.’
    • ‘These include barricades and vehicle chicanes and checkpoints outside the SECDET as well as internal defences.’
    • ‘The rest of it was just more modern houses tacked onto the road, and heavy traffic trying to get through chicanes in the road.’
    • ‘In due course, traffic management became a village issue, acrimony flourished and, as the anti-speeders campaigned for road humps and chicanes, opposition hardened.’
    • ‘The straights aren't so long that they place an absolute premium on outright power, while the chicanes and bumpy track surface demand good handling characteristics.’
    • ‘In the last eight months a bus stop has been built out into the road, chicanes have been installed, and anti-skid surfacing has been laid.’
    • ‘People visiting the exhibition are being handed leaflets listing all the options open to the council, including chicanes, mini-roundabouts and road humps.’
    • ‘And that could lead to small-scale schemes, possibly road humps and chicanes, being built within the next 18 months on rat-running routes.’
    • ‘I truly hate traffic engineers along with the rest of you - all their road humps and chicanes and one-way systems getting between me and where I want to get to.’
    • ‘In the end the cars were going too fast, and so the straight was broken up with two chicanes.’
    • ‘The combination of long straights, tight chicanes and hairpins is very demanding on the brakes.’
    • ‘They have just spent £60,000 of public money, plonking speed bumps and concrete chicanes on a country road where accidents were rare and dangerous speeding was nearly impossible.’
    • ‘It is a quick, undulating circuit with a series of demanding corners broken by chicanes.’
    • ‘Routes included woodland sections, hill climbs, obstacles, chicanes and slaloms across 1,000 metres to 2.5km courses.’
    • ‘It's the same car, but it seems better suited to tracks where you have chicanes and heavy braking, like Imola.’
    • ‘There are some fast chicanes with quick changes of direction, there are slow hairpins and fast sweeping bends.’
    • ‘It is tough for the brakes, there are the chicanes where you need to be precise and the track surface is very slippery, so it is quite easy to make mistakes.’
    • ‘On the track, they became nothing more than obstacles, rolling chicanes that endangered up-to-speed drivers.’
    • ‘We put them through a range of activities, such as chicanes and slaloms so they fully understood the limit of the vehicle.’
  • 2dated (in card games) a hand without cards of one particular suit; a void.

    • ‘With an average hand containing a chicane, an ace, and some low trumps, lead the ace followed by a low card of the same suit.’
  • 3archaic [mass noun] The use of deception; chicanery.

verb

[NO OBJECT]archaic
  • 1 Employ chicanery:

    ‘he spends more time chicaning on texts than invoking principles’
    1. 1.1[with object] Deceive (someone):
      ‘she could not chicane me into admitting the promise of marriage’

Origin

Late 17th century (in the senses ‘chicanery’ and ‘use chicanery’): from French chicane (noun), chicaner (verb) quibble, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

chicane

/ʃɪˈkeɪn/