Definition of cherry in English:

cherry

noun

  • 1A small, soft round stone fruit that is typically bright or dark red.

    ‘a bowl of cherries’
    as modifier ‘cherry pie’
    • ‘A few exceptions are made for fish and fruits that aren't generally grown in Alberta such as cherries, apples, pears, etc.’
    • ‘He couldn't believe his eyes when he found them dancing on their hind legs around a shrub blossoming with bright red cherries.’
    • ‘Garnish with slice of honeydew melon and cherries.’
    • ‘The immigrants used to work producing silk, but nowadays Willard is famous for its soft fruit, mainly cherries.’
    • ‘Opening up the fridge I dug out some fruit for breakfast and made a fruit platter of bananas, apples, pears, cherries and some left over strawberries, for both of us.’
    • ‘His mother would place a bowl of bright red cherries or shiny pistachios before us and we picked at the food as we chatted lazily.’
    • ‘In 1920, Midwestern states produced a variety of crops such as apples, cherries, grapes, tomatoes, potatoes, and strawberries.’
    • ‘If you've ever suffered poor fruit sets of apples, cherries, cucumbers, melons, or strawberries, the reason might be too few honeybees.’
    • ‘But everything looks so good I can't resist; rosy nectarines, blushing apricots, and crisp, dark cherries.’
    • ‘Today, his 47 acres have increased to more than 400 acres of pears, apples, and cherries.’
    • ‘My snack is Granny Smith apples, grapes or cherries and low-fat or fat-free cottage cheese.’
    • ‘Plant foods vary from fruits to nuts, including wild grapes, cherries, apples, persimmons, berries, and acorns.’
    • ‘Almonds, plums, apples, cherries, and lemons are enjoyed in many households fresh off the trees in family gardens.’
    • ‘In a large mixing bowl, combine cherries, blackberries, sugar, vanilla, lemon zest, and corn starch.’
    • ‘Invest in a set of small plastic boxes for chopped fresh fruit, strawberries, grapes or cherries.’
    • ‘If you place food items such as raisins, cherries, grapes, apples, and bread on a low platform feeder or on the ground, you may be able to lure some robins into your yard.’
    • ‘One nurse cannot peel raw potatoes and the other cannot eat bananas, avocados, cherries, plums, nectarines, and peaches.’
    • ‘A mature Pinot will take on complex savoury aromas and flavours of cherries and red stone fruit, with a silky texture.’
    • ‘Similarly, substitute half a cup of cherries or an apple for snacks like cookies and candy bars.’
    • ‘But he is an expert at picking apples, cherries and grapes and at pruning trees and vines.’
  • 2The tree that bears the cherry.

    • ‘I bought some starry lights for the cherry tree.’
    • ‘Looking out across the pond one sees a cherry tree in palest pink, and, farther away, the glistening white trunks of an old birch tree.’
    • ‘Nylon netting draped over your cherry tree or blueberry bushes will keep birds away.’
    • ‘And we found you this morning sitting against the cherry tree in the front yard.’
    • ‘And they sat beneath the whipping cherry tree, holding each other's hands for encouragement.’
    • ‘The pattern is a Japanese seascape, mostly water and rocks, with a single cherry tree displaying thirteen blossoms.’
    • ‘He went and sat under a cherry tree, and kicked back for a minute.’
    • ‘Some of the best known of these include the time he chopped down a cherry tree and the time he felled a bear using only a buck knife.’
    • ‘Callista paused, and cocked her head to look at a blooming cherry tree.’
    • ‘Within no less than three days, a cherry tree sprouted from that very place.’
    • ‘I wonder this as nature utterly ignores me, going about her business while paying no attention to the disheveled samurai under the cherry tree.’
    • ‘It showed a cherry tree in bloom, with the white flowers sprouting and new branches growing on top of the old.’
    • ‘And as we stood in that hug, for what felt like an hour, out of the corner of my eye I saw Natalie stare at us from underneath a cherry tree.’
    • ‘Perhaps little George did chop down the cherry tree.’
    • ‘You might for example, plant pale violet tulips at the base of a pink-flowering cherry tree.’
    • ‘There were assortments of flowers lining the driveway, and a beautiful cherry tree off to the right of the lawn.’
    • ‘They had eventually settled down for lunch underneath a blossomed cherry tree.’
    • ‘Even at night I can see that the cherry tree has blossomed.’
    • ‘All the plants are coming into bloom as well so I was able to admire the sweet-peas and the cherry tree with the scent of mint and lavender in the air.’
    • ‘The largest is a cherry tree, which is pruned to keep it in check, and there are vines, peaches, medlar and mulberry bushes to provide fruit.’
    1. 2.1mass noun The wood of the cherry tree.
      • ‘Both of the penthouses have cherrywood internal doors, halls floored in marble and fully fitted kitchens.’
      • ‘The furniture is made of beech or cherrywood and much of the upholstery is leather or suedette.’
      • ‘The internal doors and kitchen units are cherrywood, while there are contemporary, fitted wardrobes in all bedrooms.’
      • ‘Our spoons are made of cherrywood and have beautifully carved handles with your choice of a heart or moon cut-out.’
      • ‘I'd entertained visions of matte black accessories, cherrywood paneling, and recessed lighting.’
      • ‘All of the rooms are accessed off a long entrance hall which, like much of the accommodation, is floored in cherrywood.’
      • ‘She gripped the round top of the cherry bedpost that her father had fashioned so carefully.’
      • ‘Inside, the hallway in each apartment is floored in Italian marble, while the internal doors are in cherrywood.’
      • ‘Mark leaned back in his chair and tapped his pen against his cherry oak desk.’
      • ‘They then hired local woodworkers to create solid beech floors for the house and to build its doors and furniture from local cherrywood.’
      • ‘Features include an attractive semi-solid cherrywood floor, an antique cast iron and tiled fire place and French doors leading out to a courtyard.’
      • ‘Made from cherrywood, this chair, the last of five versions, was designed for a fireside alcove.’
      • ‘The houses have fitted cherrywood kitchens, solid oak doors and skirtings and specially designed carved oak balustrades with full staircases.’
      • ‘Weekend working parties had previously built a delightful chapel, furnished with articles made of birchwood and with an altar of cherrywood.’
      • ‘The cherrywood handle scales are very pleasing to the eye.’
      • ‘Upland woods contain red mulberry, slippery elm, white ash, and wild black cherry.’
      • ‘Upstairs, the master bedroom features a maple floor and fitted cherrywood wardrobes, while the remaining three bedrooms also have fitted wardrobes.’
      • ‘The kitchen is fitted with polished cherrywood floorboards and an excellent range of matching wall and floor units with black granite worktops.’
      • ‘The master bedroom has a range of cherrywood built-in wardrobes and a red oak floor.’
      • ‘A teak door with glass panels leads in to the entrance hall, which has cherrywood timber floors and recessed spotlighting.’
    2. 2.2 Used in names of unrelated plants with fruits similar to those of the cherry tree, e.g. cornelian cherry.
      • ‘In 1922 Japanese cherries were planted in Sparkes Gully but in 1923 it was decided that all future plantings should be indigenous to South Australia.’
      • ‘Where resistance to oak root fungus is needed, try bush anemone, Catalina cherry, or spice bush.’
  • 3mass noun A bright deep red colour.

    as modifier ‘her mouth was a bright cherry red’
    ‘she pulled up the collar of her cherry wool coat’
    • ‘Maroon, for example, or cherry red have much more blue in them than does brick red, but when set up with the right combinations of other colors, the mix can be stunning.’
    • ‘She had a movie-star smile completed with cherry red lips and bright alabaster teeth.’
    • ‘Red wines tend to go from cherry red to brick red to copper to brown.’
    • ‘These are again very frightening to watch, as the exhaust pipes glow cherry red to orange in colour and the noise is indescribable.’
    • ‘I yelled, my cheeks taking their cherry red colouring again.’
    • ‘This colour can range from washed-out orange and light salmon hues to vibrant day-glow and rich deep cherry pinks.’
    • ‘Nichole, the model for this style, has long fine tresses in a spectacular deep cherry hue with some subtle highlights.’
    • ‘Bright cherry red spots appear on the retinas of her eyes, and she is rendered blind.’
    • ‘That's when the foliage of many trees, shrubs, and vines starts to turn brilliant shades such as port, cherry red, and bonfire orange.’
    • ‘The last four items were all lip glosses; she left them at my house all the time: cherry red, bubblegum pink, and two clear glosses that tasted like grapefruit.’
    • ‘Avery's cheeks turned cherry red, and she quickly shuffled off.’
    • ‘When I had realized that I had voiced my thought aloud, I turned a helpless shade of cherry red and smiled sheepishly.’
    • ‘My full pouty lips were always naturally cherry red.’
    • ‘She had a porcelain doll complexion, cherry red lips, and the most gorgeous, almond shaped, dark brown eyes he had ever seen.’
    • ‘She had out a bottle of cherry red nail polish and was applying the liquid as she spoke.’
    • ‘My face turned from cherry red to a deathly white.’
    • ‘It was once cherry red, but now it was caked in mud.’
    • ‘When purchasing red meat the flesh should be firm, cherry red in colour and finely grained.’
    • ‘He stopped short and turned around, his face a shade of cherry red.’
    • ‘His face had gone cherry red, and it seemed as though steam should have escaped his ears, but that hadn't happened.’
    scarlet, vermilion, ruby, ruby-red, ruby-coloured, cherry, cherry-red, cerise, cardinal, carmine, wine, wine-red, wine-coloured, claret, claret-red, claret-coloured, blood-red
    View synonyms
  • 4one's cherryinformal One's virginity.

    ‘only 3 per cent of the students lost their cherry at college’

Phrases

  • a bite at the cherry

    • An attempt or opportunity to do something.

      ‘the team had victory snatched from their grasp, and could well have had their last bite at the cherry’
      • ‘Displayed at the Stafford show early in 2005, the new owner couldn't make a go of it and Paul quickly got another chance of a bite at the cherry.’
      • ‘I am concerned that there is such legislative progress in this House that the Assembly does not get much of a bite at the cherry.’
      • ‘Governments need to get a bite at the cherry - they need to be able to have 80 per cent of what is currently possible.’
      • ‘If you want the domain you should use every leverage you can to prevent anybody else having a bite at the cherry.’
      • ‘That is the problem I suppose, isn't democracy about everyone having a bite at the cherry?’
      • ‘Virgin Blue, Australia's second biggest carrier will get a bite at the cherry ahead of Singapore.’
      • ‘Yes of course we're going to buy it but a demo gives us a bite at the cherry a few days/weeks or whatever before we grab it off the shelves.’
  • a bowl of cherries

    • usually with negativeA very pleasant or enjoyable situation or experience.

      ‘life isn't exactly a bowl of cherries’
      • ‘My life hasn't been, as Mary Jane would put it, a bowl of cherries.’
      • ‘History tells us that life as a rock star is far from a bowl of cherries.’
      • ‘Let's first acknowledge the fact that life has never been a bowl of cherries - for either women or men.’
      • ‘It is said that ‘life is just a bowl of cherries.’’
      • ‘Until that day, life had been a bowl of cherries with few pits.’
      • ‘It just goes to show that even when life is a bowl of cherries, the pits may not be far away.’
      • ‘Life may be just a bowl of cherries, with lots of cherry pits for us to chip our teeth on under the soft, sweet fruit.’
      • ‘Step inside my family life a little, maybe then you won't think everything's such a bowl of cherries.’
      • ‘It isn't a bowl of cherries being outdoors - though turkeys are fairly hardy.’
      • ‘It's not a big bunch of roses or a bowl of cherries out here right now.’
  • the cherry on the cake (or on top)

    • A desirable feature perceived as the finishing touch to something that is already very good.

      ‘the car is faster than a Ferrari, but the cherry on the cake is the price’
      • ‘There's no doubt that the afternoon slot at Radio 1 is like the cherry on the cake for him.’
      • ‘The approaching thunderstorm was the cherry on the cake.’
      • ‘Perfect use of lighting, scenography and projections emphasised slick performances by a formidable cast and an evocative musical score was the cherry on the cake.’
      • ‘This one was the cherry on the cake for L: he loved it.’
      • ‘First, he presented me with a new tournament golf bag and then, before my feet touched the ground, he put the cherry on the cake.’
      • ‘The news that the men and women on board included the first Israeli in space would have been the cherry on the cake.’
      • ‘Competing at Brand's Hatch with the big boys was always the main objective for me and Monaco is going to be the cherry on the cake!’
      • ‘Such gripes, though, are minor, as this is but the cherry on the cake, the cake in question being next year's fifth album proper.’
      • ‘Winning a place in Edinburgh's Festival after a 19-year absence seems like the cherry on the cake.’
      • ‘It would be the cherry on the cake and a great reward for the players who have been working really hard for the past two years.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old Northern French cherise, from medieval Latin ceresia, based on Greek kerasos ‘cherry tree, cherry’. The final - s was lost because cherise was interpreted as plural (compare with caper and pea).

Pronunciation

cherry

/ˈtʃɛri/