Definition of cheer in English:

cheer

verb

  • 1no object Shout for joy or in praise or encouragement.

    ‘she cheered from the sidelines’
    • ‘The crowd reacted by cheering and breaking out in loud bouts of laughter.’
    • ‘On reaching the one million euro mark the crowd cheered loudly.’
    • ‘He shouted something in his language and the crowds cheered once more.’
    • ‘The troop was pumped, the music was blaring, and the crowd was cheering.’
    • ‘But the crowd never stopped cheering and the day was a wonderful antidote to all that had gone before.’
    • ‘In response, the crowd cheered and at times even hooted its approval.’
    • ‘I looked at the crowd and everyone was cheering for us.’
    • ‘She could hear the crowd cheering loudly, shouting things she could not seem to grasp.’
    • ‘As I came across the field I heard the crowd shouting and cheering as I got closer.’
    • ‘At one point the crowd was cheering between set changes, something I've never even seen in my life.’
    • ‘They lowered the window pane of their car as they left the hospital after the birth, and cheered at the gathered crowd.’
    • ‘After a collective gasp, the crowd cheered ecstatically.’
    • ‘The crowd cheered as he proved just why he has won so many dance competitions.’
    • ‘The races caused great excitement with the crowds cheering and hooting for their favourite teams.’
    • ‘It was too easy, but the crowd cheered, so I came away feeling as if I had provided a little entertainment to start their morning.’
    • ‘Men and women go head to head, spitting out lyrics against each other with the crowd cheering for the cleverest ones.’
    • ‘A great crowd turned up to cheer on the band of swimmers who took to the icy waters of the Shannon.’
    • ‘The crowd started cheering as the DJ introduced their school's homecoming court.’
    • ‘Wearing suits, they held hands and carried flowers as the crowd cheered.’
    • ‘All the balloons were released as the crowd cheered and watched them disappear.’
    encourage, urge on, spur on, drive on, motivate, rally, inspire, fire, fire up
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    1. 1.1with object Praise or encourage with shouts.
      ‘MPs rose to cheer the Chancellor’
      ‘the cyclists were cheered on by the crowds’
      • ‘It is hoped that lots of supporters will come to cheer us along.’
      • ‘So should environmentalists be cheering the news that Hollywood has finally managed a green epic?’
      • ‘The singer reportedly broke down and wept onstage, even as her Chinese supporters cheered her on and called out to her not to cry.’
      • ‘Supporters would cheer their side on because they knew them, and would most likely have a drink with them after the game.’
      • ‘He cheered his friend on to victory from the VIP balcony.’
      • ‘Investors appeared to cheer the news and the fall of the last few days started to turn around.’
      • ‘On the final day many students from various schools came to support and cheer their teams, hoping to see their school win the competition.’
      • ‘GWU students cheered the news of the Napster plan but expressed some scepticism.’
      • ‘York education bosses were today cheering the news that they have won more than £1 million for new school buildings.’
      • ‘Unlike some of my fellow Wales supporters, I was cheering England on.’
      • ‘We should cheer the good news, of course, but the downgrading of offshoring as a national issue is a big mistake.’
      • ‘This is the only home game left in the league as the remaining three games are away and a large support to cheer the lads on would be appreciated.’
      • ‘But with the ball at his feet, and the Celtic support cheering him on, the tricks come naturally.’
      • ‘The sides were neck and neck for most of the time as the supporters cheered them on.’
      • ‘As we walked into the TA our support crew cheered us on and we plopped into the chairs set out for us.’
      • ‘We were spotted immediately and a welcoming committee of children cheered our arrival.’
      • ‘The Sarsfields however will be hoping to meet the challenge head on and they will be looking for a big support to cheer them on for what is undoubtedly their biggest game of the year.’
      • ‘They will be hoping to have a full strength squad to choose from and hopefully a big crowd will turn out to lend their support and cheer the Sarsfields on to what we hope will be a victory.’
      • ‘It makes you feel macho and strong to be able to beat up people and vent out your frustrations on these folks while your friends cheer you on.’
      • ‘This was a close and exciting game with a huge number of supporters cheering their sides on.’
      acclaim, hail, salute, praise, congratulate, toast, hurrah, hurray, applaud, clap, shout for, whistle
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  • 2with object Give comfort or support to.

    ‘he seemed greatly cheered by my arrival’
    • ‘This thought cheers Sancho greatly and he asks Don Quijote how much he's willing to pay for each lash.’
    • ‘This is cheering news for anyone who has ever found their heart-rate going haywire in the company of a handsome nurse or beautiful doctor.’
    • ‘The news will cheer John who has been spearheading a battle to spare residents the misery of the new wave of firework events all year round.’
    • ‘He tries to cheer him with news of the sheep dogs he has bought for their new occupation.’
    • ‘It contains light to direct you, food to support you, and comfort to cheer you.’
    • ‘I've gone to the keyboard in times of celebration and mourning and never has the instrument failed to comfort or cheer me.’
    • ‘Here are two fast breaking news stories to cheer the heart.’
    • ‘The sun is up and bright; that ought to cheer my little friend up a tad.’
    • ‘The fact that the city still has 600 parks, at least going by the records, is cheering news.’
    • ‘His sunny disposition doubtless cheered Americans up, but the key factor in his success was the end of the oil crisis.’
    • ‘So it cheers me greatly to read about people like this bloke who kept on writing even though the rejections could wallpaper his office five times over.’
    • ‘Enlist the help of a life coach, friend, or family member to cheer you on in support.’
    • ‘They are used to having people supporting them, cheering them and obeying orders.’
    • ‘She was disappointed about that, but she did find an aloe plant, which cheered her greatly.’
    • ‘I returned home to cheering news from Kingster, who had kindly e-mailed to let me know just how limited my life expectancy is.’
    • ‘There is more cheering news for Cameron supporters, though.’
    raise someone's spirits, brighten, buoy up, enliven, animate, elate, exhilarate, hearten, gladden, uplift, give a lift to, perk up, encourage, comfort, solace, console
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    1. 2.1cheer someone up" or "cheer up Make or become less miserable.
      with object ‘I asked her out to lunch to cheer her up’
      no object ‘he cheered up at the sight of the food’
      • ‘They had taken care of her when she was sick, or hurt, and they had comforted and cheered her up when she was sad.’
      • ‘She had a smile on her face that could cheer me up no matter how miserable I was feeling.’
      • ‘The sheer pointlessness of the exercise always cheers them up.’
      • ‘I know what I'm saying probably doesn't make sense, and I'll admit it, I have no idea how to cheer you up or comfort you, but I'm still going to try my best.’
      • ‘He's clever and handsome, and he cheers you up when you're feeling sad, and he always washes all the pots and pans after lunch, and puts them away neatly.’
      • ‘To your friends, you are always that loyal companion standing by their side, cheering them up when they're feeling down.’
      • ‘Suddenly, she perked up, and I knew she just came up with a new inspiration to cheer me up.’
      • ‘It cheers me up enormously, and I don't really know why.’
      • ‘Two DVDs arrived this week, cheering me up to no end.’
      • ‘He cheers her up, she calms him down, and together they manage to be sincere, cool and winningly goofy at the same time.’
      • ‘The little boy utters the same encouraging words she used to cheer him up.’
      • ‘Now when I wake up in the middle of the night feeling not worthy, I ring him and he cheers me up.’
      • ‘Laughter is not only the best medicine when it comes to cheering you up and making you feel better, it helps you keep fit and lose weight as well.’
      • ‘He said he was thankful to his teachers, who had encouraged him and cheered him up when he was unhappy.’
      • ‘When people feel down, buying and eating sweets always cheers them up.’
      • ‘I did my best to cheer them up and encourage them.’
      • ‘The goal is to pair patients with books which will serve as an inspiration for them to get better - or at least cheer them up.’
      • ‘Jodi was forced to grow up quickly and became a huge source of comfort to her mother, often buying her sunflowers to cheer her up.’
      • ‘Sometimes you feel very lonely and down, but to see all the kids having a good time cheers you up and gives you hope.’
      • ‘Thanking people cheers them up; you can see their faces light up.’
      perk up, brighten, brighten up, become more cheerful, pick up, liven up, become livelier, rally, revive, bounce back, take heart, be heartened, take on a new lease of life
      raise someone's spirits, make happier, make more cheerful, buoy up, perk up, enliven, animate, hearten, gladden, uplift, give a lift to, encourage
      View synonyms

noun

  • 1A shout of encouragement, praise, or joy.

    ‘a tremendous cheer from the audience’
    • ‘When they finally got out of the stadium, they could see a huge valley of people screaming cheers of encouragement and delight at them.’
    • ‘His words were drowned out by claps and cheers from the audience of scientists, engineers and guests.’
    • ‘The cheers and shouting grew louder as she approached town.’
    • ‘The sound of cheers and shouts echoed throughout the whole gym.’
    • ‘There were a few hoots and cheers from the audience again.’
    • ‘A theatre full of modern-day hyperactive children still laughs and cheers at all the right places.’
    • ‘At the presentation ceremony in the school hall, all the pupils came together to give the dinner ladies three tremendous cheers.’
    • ‘Everyone ought to lead a parade once in their life, just to experience the curious sensation of marching down the middle of the street to cheers and hurrahs.’
    • ‘Then the room exploded into cheers and claps and catcalls.’
    • ‘He looked into the crowd, first to the left then the right, all the while letting his people idolize him with cheers and yells.’
    • ‘The congregation claps and cheers and then goes home and bad-talks the pastor over Sunday lunch.’
    • ‘Elizabeth's gay laugh mingled with the cheers and hollers of everyone out in the yard.’
    • ‘That line did not arouse raucous cheers or a standing ovation.’
    • ‘When he took the chair for the last time as leader he was greeted by tremendous cheers and a chorus of ‘For He's a Jolly Good Fellow’.’
    • ‘The watchers began to make wagers and to shout encouragements and cheers.’
    • ‘The screams of agony were lost among the cheers and shouts of joy at his appearance, as his handlers kept him moving quickly from person to person.’
    • ‘There were great cheers and shouts from the children.’
    • ‘There were a few shouts and some cheers as people raised their hands, glasses or anything they happened to be holding.’
    • ‘The field and stands erupted into cheers and celebratory shouts.’
    • ‘He wore their red and white colours with pride, enjoyed their success with shouts and cheers.’
    hurrah, hurray, whoop, bravo, hoot, shout, shriek
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  • 2mass noun Cheerfulness, optimism, or confidence.

    ‘an attempt to inject a little cheer into this gloomy season’
    • ‘They bring about an element of optimism and cheer in one's life.’
    • ‘This is not a column of Christmas cheer, but it hopes to tap Christmas charity.’
    • ‘Yes, I was trying to bring a little joy and cheer into the world.’
    • ‘These filled shoe boxes are Christmas presents that we hope will bring some cheer to these children on Christmas morning.’
    • ‘The volunteers' main aim is to make strangers feel at home, loved and appreciated by spreading cheer and elation all around.’
    • ‘She would say and do things at random, and it was always said or done with her usual cheer and joy.’
    • ‘It was an evening of rejoicing and good cheer at the annual switching on of the Foxford Christmas Lights.’
    • ‘He wondered where the joy and cheer of the day had gone.’
    • ‘A Gemini person brings good cheer and happiness in your life.’
    • ‘It is at once an outlet for our feelings and a source of cheer and hope.’
    • ‘Special events held at the school are real treats for the kids, bringing joy and cheer into their lives.’
    • ‘It pops like-minded scribes into committees and they help to spread saffron cheer by selecting others like themselves, or doing what is expected of them.’
    • ‘For our own culture, steeped as it is in the relentless pursuit of personal pleasure and endless cheer, that message is worth heeding.’
    • ‘In today's world of stress and struggle it is a great thing if I can bring cheer, hope and liveliness to my family and surroundings.’
    • ‘It was good activist fun that brought cheer to the soul.’
    • ‘The weekend includes a disco, and should be lots of fun as a whole, with lots of high spirits and good cheer!’
    • ‘But I do hope they bring some cheer for this season and beyond.’
    • ‘Upon returning, we learn that holidays are not always filled with fun and good cheer.’
    • ‘Thousands of visitors poured into York over the Golden Jubilee Bank Holiday - bringing cheer to businesses coping with gloomy figures.’
    • ‘It brings good cheer and some rays of hope to the darkest days of winter.’
    happiness, joy, joyousness, cheerfulness, cheeriness, gladness, merriment, gaiety, hilarity, mirth, glee, blitheness, jubilation, exultation, euphoria, jollity, jolliness, high spirits, joviality, jocularity, conviviality, light-heartedness, buoyancy, optimism, hope, hopefulness
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    1. 2.1 Food and drink provided for a festive occasion.
      ‘they had partaken heartily of the Christmas cheer’
      • ‘With drink and festive cheer in excess, it's easy to throw caution to the wind and find yourself acting recklessly on a Christmas night out.’
      fare, food, foodstuffs, eatables, provisions, rations, sustenance, meat
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Phrases

  • of good cheer

    • archaic Cheerful; optimistic.

      • ‘Though it is a season of good cheer and goodwill toward all, it is also a time of conspicuous energy consumption.’
      • ‘With the kids jingle belling and everyone telling you be of good cheer, it's the most wonderful time of the year.’
      • ‘For many folks, the holidays are a time to join family and loved ones in a blizzard of good cheer and heartwarming togetherness.’
      • ‘There was plenty of good cheer as everyone sat down to a four course meal.’
      • ‘It was to be a rosy day, full of good cheer and bright optimism.’
      happy, jolly, merry, bright, glad, sunny, joyful, joyous, light-hearted, in good spirits, in high spirits, sparkling, bubbly, exuberant, ebullient, cock-a-hoop, elated, gleeful, breezy, airy, cheery, sprightly, jaunty, animated, radiant, smiling, grinning, laughing, mirthful, frolicsome
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  • three cheers

    • Three successive hurrahs shouted to express appreciation or congratulation.

      ‘three cheers for the winners!’
      • ‘He and the other two waved the rest off and said three cheers to them.’
      • ‘She was treated to a chorus of ‘happy birthday’ and three cheers from the assembled guests.’
      • ‘When they tried to raise three cheers for the couple during the walkabout, they could only muster two.’
      • ‘Respecting Copyright is a good thing, and three cheers for a website that makes it easier to do that.’
      • ‘There was levity, including lots of cheers and high spirits, a conga line and even three cheers for the Queen's 50th jubilee.’
      • ‘One passenger led the rest in three cheers for Concorde.’
      • ‘It was a congratulations to him and a three cheers.’
      • ‘If the relocation of 110 civil service jobs from London to York is not worth three cheers, it certainly merits a hearty two.’
      • ‘The Commerce students of Fatima College topped the competitive list with high scores, receiving three cheers from the spectators.’
      • ‘Join with me now, and give three cheers for the life of a great Tasmanian.’
  • two cheers

    • Qualified approval or mild enthusiasm.

      ‘larger companies gave at least two cheers for the Budget’
      • ‘The crowd seems somewhat restrained, giving him two cheers (we give him three) surrounding two beatitudes, both from Ps 118: 25-26, and part of the Passover seder.’
      • ‘Against this background, the reforms to the Penal Code approved by the National Assembly last week are to be greeted with two cheers, forfeiting one as a penalty for MPs having taken so long to getting around to it.’
      • ‘He raises two cheers for TV talent shows’
      • ‘But I still think that the progress humanists have made on this issue in recent years deserves a resounding - two cheers.’
      • ‘While critical here, I still give Danny two cheers, and no one will cheer a third time more loudly if he can successfully address the issues raised here.’
      • ‘We watch fascinated as that character squirms his way through to a moral victory of sorts, then we give him a half-hearted two cheers for just surviving.’
      • ‘As the World Cup lunacy begins, I intend to summon up my two cheers for anyone who has a hope of beating our English friends.’
      • ‘He said: ‘There were two cheers for these promises but locals want more effective action taken now, to improve station safety.’’
      • ‘Many will greet such noble intentions with two cheers, having heard them before and waited too long to see them put into practice.’
      • ‘We should only give two cheers for him, since he would have been on even stronger ground had he told West that his so-called scholarly research was worthless.’
  • what cheer?

    • archaic How are you?

Origin

Middle English: from Old French chiere ‘face’, from late Latin cara, from Greek kara ‘head’. The original sense was ‘face’, hence ‘expression, mood’, later specifically ‘a good mood’.

Pronunciation

cheer

/tʃɪə/