Definition of chauffeur in English:

chauffeur

Pronunciation /ˈʃəʊfə//ʃəʊˈfəː/

noun

  • A person employed to drive a private or hired car.

    ‘a chauffeur-driven limousine’
    • ‘It gave him his luxury apartment in Berlin, his chauffeur, bodyguard and private barber.’
    • ‘Our chauffeurs drove us to the royal compound at the appointed hour, and we were shown to a room in one of the buildings on the property.’
    • ‘From there he became a chauffeur for a private estate, until his employer suffered a slump in fortune.’
    • ‘He arranged to be taken by chauffeur driven limousine and the chauffeur was required to remain for the duration of the visit.’
    • ‘He was being driven by a chauffeur when the vehicle was stopped by traffic officers in Hertfordshire travelling at 97 mph.’
    • ‘We had two maids and a chauffeur who used to drive us to Jaffa and Haifa for picnics on the weekend.’
    • ‘The defendant employed a chauffeur, and on one occasion when he was attempting to start the car it caught fire.’
    • ‘Julia watches as her chauffeur drives Morgan out of the estate and the limousine speeds away into the distance.’
    • ‘At Chelsea there was a chauffeur to drive the directors around because of problems with parking.’
    • ‘Chan plays a cab driver who is hired as a chauffeur to the head of a secret government spy unit.’
    • ‘The chauffeur, who drives 80,000 miles a year, managed to pull on to the hard shoulder and saw, in his rear view mirror, the teenagers scrambling up the bank.’
    • ‘A chauffeur was wanted to drive an art expert around galleries in Europe.’
    • ‘When the town was completely out of sight, the chauffeur drove down a road which within only a few miles lost its metalled base and crumbled into rough cobbles.’
    • ‘I'm in the back, he's in the front and the chauffeur's driving.’
    • ‘In golf a superstar is supposed to win major championships and be recognised even by people who don't know the difference between a driver and a chauffeur.’
    • ‘He works as a chauffeur, driving wealthy vacationers all over Europe.’
    • ‘Why didn't you stay home today and take a swim in the pool or have a chauffeur drive you elsewhere?’
    • ‘When we got to the end of the drive, the chauffeur got out and opened the door for us.’
    • ‘Most were employed by the Indonesian Embassy in Bangkok as chauffeurs and gardeners.’
    • ‘After the evening performance the night before, a chauffeur drove her from Bath to a suite at an airport hotel.’

verb

[with object]
  • Drive (a car or a passenger in a car), typically as part of one's job.

    ‘she insisted on being chauffeured around’
    • ‘Social scientists claim to have overturned the popular notion that modern children never walk because they are chauffeured everywhere by their parents.’
    • ‘The federal government offered such ‘symbolic support’ as holding a cabinet meeting at an exclusive Toronto hotel, to and from which they were chauffeured with great haste.’
    • ‘He chauffeured her to her 9 a.m. appointment at Avalon Spa.’
    • ‘I'd just got back from a very damp and dismal trip to Taunton station, chauffeuring Graham to catch the train back to London, and I was feeling a little down.’
    • ‘The men and women who chauffeured the athletes and dignitaries around the city would stop and talk to other drivers in the road and people on the streets.’
    • ‘He tells parents who spend hours chauffeuring teenagers to drive slowly and to take the scenic route when time permits.’
    • ‘Whatever a hackney carriage may be classed as, it is still a car that carries a limited number of passengers who are paying for the privilege of being chauffeured from door to door.’
    • ‘They were chauffeured away immediately afterwards.’
    • ‘‘Statistics show that children who walk, cycle or catch the bus to school arrive fresher and more alert than those who are chauffeured to the classroom,’ she said.’
    • ‘One of his early jobs was chauffeuring Martin Scorsese for the duration of one Edinburgh Film Festival.’
    • ‘‘Of course, I was looking forward to chauffeuring my father in it,’ he recalls.’
    • ‘For nearly two decades, cheerful Norman Mouland chauffeured a host of Salisbury mayors to some of the city's most glittering events.’
    • ‘We couldn't believe how many kids were being chauffeured to school by their parents.’
    • ‘On Thursday, you and I learn that we can't drive to school anymore, but we have to be chauffeured by the Secret Service.’
    • ‘I always believe in chauffeuring a lady to her front door.’
    • ‘Since he is shorter and has a tendency to slump over anyway, I sometimes wonder if people think I'm his mother chauffeuring him around instead of his date.’
    • ‘After his hospital visit, Mr Brown was chauffeured to open the Feltham Skills Centre, which opened its doors in September and already serves 300 students.’
    • ‘In the run-up to his trial he had been reduced to doing gardening work and chauffeuring friends to make ends meet.’
    • ‘Owners Vivenne and Colin have chauffeured the canine connoisseurs to eight cottages in Pembrokeshire.’
    • ‘For the next few months until I was able to drive again, my husband chauffeured me everywhere to talk about my new book.’
    transport, convey, carry, bear, ship, run, take, bring, shuttle
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 19th century (in the general sense ‘motorist’): from French, literally ‘stoker’ (by association with steam engines), from chauffer ‘to heat’.

Pronunciation

chauffeur

/ˈʃəʊfə//ʃəʊˈfəː/